After reviewing these FAQs, you can learn more by visiting our Center for Advising and Career Services.

Frequently Asked Questions

The Center for Advising and Career Services (CACS) has transitioned its full range of services remotely from personalized advising to career management courses, virtual workshops, and employer recruiting sessions. Advising appointments (via Zoom or by phone) for all degrees are available in Handshake. If you are in a different time zone and our availability is not convenient for you, simply notify your advisor and they will happily offer alternative times to meet.

If you are a TESOL or TFL student, your career advisor will be Dr. Kathi Bailey. You can make an appointment by contacting her at kbailey@miis.edu with some suggested dates/times. Be sure to note your time zone.

Yes, many of our students have been able to successfully transition their in-person internships to remote opportunities.

Earning your master’s credential, whether in person or remotely, will only open doors for you throughout the course of your career. No matter where you are on your career path, investing in your education will allow you to acquire the knowledge, skills, and abilities that employers are actively seeking and will help you achieve your career goals.

Online Discussion: Careers and Internships 

Gael Meraud, assistant dean for career and academic advising; Bryce Craft, director of employer relations; and members of the Center for Advising and Career Services’ team answer prospective students’ questions about careers and internships. Please note that this was recorded before the decision was made to be remote for the fall 2020 semester.

Careers and Internships online discussion

Devin Lueddeke:

Hello, and welcome to this online discussion about careers and internships. My name is Devin, and I’ll be your host today. So today we are joined by our Center for Advising and Career Services team, who deliver one of the most unique and hands-on advising experiences in higher education. And I’m excited for you to learn about this team and how they work with students and where they help students go. And to get us started, I’d like to introduce the Assistant Dean for Career and Academic Advising, Gael Meraud. Gael, the room is yours.

Gael Meraud:

Thank you, Devin. It’s so nice to be able to see your faces today. My name, again, is Gael Meraud. And we’re really just excited to have this opportunity to connect with you as you join us from different parts of the world. In fact, I’m joined by our entire team in the Center for Advising and Career Services, and that includes our associate, who manages all of our operations, as well as our team of advisors, who each specialize on various degree programs, so that they can provide you with the most in-depth professional and academic guidance that’s relevant to your career fields. So they’re joining from behind the scenes today to share their expertise and help answer your questions in the chat.

We don’t really have time to introduce everyone individually, so props team, you can just wave hello, so that they can see you. They’ve also renamed themselves to accommodate their roles that they advise for, so that you’ll be able to recognize them in that way as well. I have also invited my colleague, Bryce Craft, to join me in speaking with you today. As our director of employer relations, he is particularly well positioned to be able to talk to you today about career and internship opportunities. So Bryce, will you go ahead and introduce yourself?

Bryce Craft:

Absolutely. Thank you so much, Gael. And it’s a pleasure to see most of you, but to be here with all of you. Again, I want to start just by commending all of you for being here and taking advantage of this opportunity and taking this first step in doing your due diligence. I’m an alum, I graduated in 2011 from the MBA program, and when Gael talks about a full suite of opportunities that CACS offers, they really do, it’s absolutely amazing. And so hopefully, all of you can take advantage of that, and today starts that. So again, it’s a pleasure to be here.

Gael Meraud:

Great. Thank you, Bryce. Well, I thought I would just open it up by telling you a little bit about what you can expect in working with the Center for Advising and Career Services. And as I mentioned, you each have a dedicated advisor, who specializes on your degree programs. So they can really provide you with in-depth information about all of the resources that are relevant to the career fields you might be considering. But I also wanted you to know that in addition to your dedicated advisor who’s specialized in your areas, we also have this entire team of advisors that are available to you, and they each bring a different area of expertise, but you’re welcome to access. So you don’t just have a dedicated advisor, you have a whole team who is here to support your career success.

And over and over again, we see, in the Center for Advising and Career Services, that our most successful students are those who really take a proactive approach towards their career development and carve out time from the very beginning of their studies to work towards their career goals. So, with that in mind, we work with you, even before the first day of classes. During orientation, we’ve created some really robust programming, so that we can help set the foundation to your career management success during that time, before you’ve even begun. So your advisor will help you, during that time period, clarify your career objectives, they’ll help you start practicing communicating your professional strengths, and even begin to assess your career readiness.

Then typically in your very first semester, students will enroll in a career management course, and that really just helps you build on that foundation that was created during orientation, so you can really make sure you’re chipping away at those goals within the very beginning of your time here. Typically, then, throughout your entire studies, obviously, your advisor is going to support you one-on-one, wherever you are in the process. Everybody’s in a slightly different place in their career development, everybody has different needs. We’re fortunate to have a really small team compared to the number of students we advise, so we get to really work with you [inaudible 00:04:31] and customize our advising to where you are.

So generally speaking, though, they’ll help you craft your resumes and cover letters and build your online presence, so that you can really have the best opportunity for securing interview opportunities, for example. They’ll help you broaden your professional network and really help you access the hidden job market, which is especially important in this day and age, so that by the time you’re seriously ready to launch your career search, you will know how to interview effectively, you will know how to negotiate offers, and more importantly, you’ll really even understand that next step on your career path.

So essentially, our mission is to partner with you from the very beginning, to set you up for success in managing your career over the long term. So not just that first job at graduation, we’re certainly here to help you prepare for that, but we take a more longterm strategic approach in helping you set you up for success throughout the course of your careers. So I’ll just say one more note about the coronavirus pandemic before I turn it over to Bryce, because I think that’s top of mind for many of us, as it is impacting the global economy and the job market, and that’s evolving on a daily basis.

So essentially, as organizations, some of them, of course, are downsizing and putting hiring freezes in place, while other organizations are actively recruiting. Positions are in flux, so some positions are changing in scope and in structure, while in other cases, brand new positions are emerging that weren’t available before. So as organizations are adjusting, we are actively researching the shifting market and really trying to identify those emerging trends, so that we can help our students understand what the employer’s recruiting needs are and really help them identify where the career opportunities are.

So we’re doing that through researching specific individual career fields, because not every career field is being impacted equally during these times. We’re also connecting with many industry thought leaders, and then we’re conducting our own employer outreach, so that… with our own partners to really get a better sense of what their recruiting needs are during this day and age. So I think that’s actually a good opportunity now to turn it over to Bryce to talk more about the insights we’re learning on that front.

Bryce Craft:

Thanks Gael. So I know you all just heard a ton from Gael. Everything from all the services provided, to what we’re doing to stay in front of the employers. I want to take a step back to going back to me being an alum. And where I went to undergrad, it was a very large state school in Missouri, the University of Missouri, and only thing I knew about as far as advising or a counselor was going to my counselor to make sure I had my classes in order, so I would graduate on time.

So I had that same mindset when I came to MIIS, I just went and saw my advisor to make sure that my courses were in order, so that I would graduate on time, not knowing about all the other opportunities that were available and what we could have discussed from a resume review, cover letter review, mock interviews, assisting with my job search, connecting me with other MIIS alumni for job opportunities or job leads, or to get them to serve as a mentor, or just introduce myself and network. That’s what’s there, that’s what’s available, and that’s why we’re all here, is to do that. And I work closely with the advisors, and I do some of that myself, kind of a time when I’m asked to do part of the mock interviews and everything else.

So I want to make sure that you’re confident, not only confident, but aware that those resources are there for you, so take advantage of them. I think that’s the key when we start talking about a job search, is you’re not alone. You have your advisors, you have all of the advisors to work with you from all the programs, and with their expertise to assist. So make sure, if you’re taking notes, write that down, because that’s the key. Don’t just go to them to make sure your classes are in order and you’re going to graduate on time; utilize them, come see them, heck, go see them everyday, if you want to. But see as much as possible. That’s one of my biggest recommendations.

But as far as the employers, as Gael mentioned, we constantly stay in front of our employers. That’s the key. My job is to serve as a bridge between all the students and alumni and the employers, and it’s to get those employers to recruit MIIS students, and I want to make sure that in doing that, I’m assisting all of you in your job search to make you aware of everything that’s out there. Now, that’s part of our job too, as director of employer relations and the advisors, to increase your awareness about opportunities, because there is a lot out there.

And one of the things that we’ve been doing since COVID-19 and this pandemic, aside from our big employer partners that we already know we’re doing as far as hiring or not hiring or hiring freeze or hiring for internships only, whatever it may be, we also surveyed our employer partners. And that’s just to make sure that we stay in front of them, we continuously learn what their hiring needs are and what the temperature is with their hiring needs at the employer. And if it’s project work, practicum work, internship jobs, volunteer opportunities, whatever it is, we want to make sure we know about that, so we can get those opportunities in front of all of our students, in front of all of our alumni.

But also, it serves another purpose too, and that’s for us to stay in front of the employers, so we stay top of mind. And what we’re seeing, the latest results, what we’re doing, from this survey is about 80% of our employer partners are still hiring in some fashion. Again, that could be a practicum opportunity, a project, volunteer internship, or job. But 80% of those employers are still hiring in some form. So that’s positive news. So it’s not all doom and gloom. Our employer partners are still hiring. They’re still emailing me, calling me every single day, looking for that MIIS talent. So that’s great.

And we’re seeing that, especially in some of the sectors too, like government and other areas, that are hiring like crazy right now. So there’s still opportunities, but the key with that knowledge is you still have to sharpen your tools, you still have to utilize your resources, and one of the biggest ways to do that is to continuously meet with your advisor and stay in contact with your advisor, so they’re up to date on what your job search is. They’re not going to do your job search for you, but they’re here to support your job search. So that’s one of the keys.

Another thing that we’ve been doing is continuing our virtual information sessions or recruiting sessions with employers. We’ve still been having those regularly, and the employers are still recruiting MIIS students recruiting, MIIS alumni. We’re still posting our opportunities to our career platform, which is Handshake. I’m not sure how many of you are already familiar with Handshake and if you used it in undergrad, but that’s our career platform, and we’re still regularly posting opportunities up there. So I can speak more to that if you have specific questions, and I’d love to hear from you, if you have questions. Obviously, there’s questions about what the advisors do and the other resources that you can utilize. Please ask away, don’t be shy. This is your time.

Devin Lueddeke:

Great. Thank you so much, Bryce. Appreciate that. So I would like to invite everyone to post your questions in the chat. Thanks, Jill, for the reminder on that. And of course, I have a few questions here that we’ve received from students to my office and my team that all I’ll ask now. And this was touched on a bit in both of your comments, and Bryce, you just touched on this. But maybe for Gael, how has the move to remote learning this past semester affected your ability to deliver the services that your team delivers?

Gael Meraud:

Absolutely. Yeah, great question. Well, we’ve been very fortunate in this regard, because we work with so many students who are off-campus, who do practicum opportunities, study-abroad opportunities, all kinds of different immersive learning opportunities, where they’re not actually physically on campus. So we were already well-positioned to have the infrastructure in place to be able to work with our students one-on-one seamlessly. So for example, Bryce mentioned Handshake, and that is our career management platform. And students have been able to sign up to meet with us one-on-one, just as before, only now the only options are through Zoom and through phone, not in person at the moment. But that was very easy for us to continue to connect with our students one-on-one in that regard.

In terms of workshops, we had a couple of workshops that were scheduled to be in person before everything changed, and our advising team did a fantastic job of really redesigning the curriculum for those workshops to make it really useful to do in a hands-on manner virtually. So big shout out to them. In fact, we even learned some practices that we’re going to implement going forward, because I would say that we found some practices that make it even more interactive and successful through breakout rooms and that kind of thing.

And then Bryce, you had touched on a little bit the employer info sessions, and perhaps you’d like to talk a little bit about that. [crosstalk 00:13:56].

Bryce Craft:

Yes, absolutely. Do you want me to go into more about what that looks like and what that is? Is that kind of what-

Gael Meraud:

I was thinking specifically about how you’ve done such a great job of transitioning so many of our employer recruiting sessions, for example, that already… where they were originally not to be in person in DC, for example, and then you were able to transition those over and then build on that to create more opportunities.

Bryce Craft:

Yeah. Yeah. I can definitely speak to that. One of the things Gael is referring to is during our spring break every year, except this past year, we take a trip to Washington DC, and we call it our DC Career Exploration Week. We do a full week there, it’s during spring break, and we set up two to three employer visits for each program, or for the majority of MIIS programs, every single day during that week. So let’s say, for example… I don’t know how many of you are here that are planning to be NPTs students. We set up two to three NPTs relevant employer visits each day at that week. And we go to their offices, get an opportunity to meet with the recruiters there, hiring managers, see the offices there, and really get a feel for what it’s like to work there, a day in the life there. So those are those in-person recruiting sessions that we’re doing during that week.

With the pandemic this year, that was all canceled, but we were still able to get the majority of those employers to do virtual sessions via Zoom or WebEx, and still recruit our students, still talk about those employment opportunities, internship opportunities, volunteer opportunities, what they’re looking for in candidates, give that advice, an opportunity to network with them and meet them. And that carried through, only through our spring break for that DC trip, but that carried through, as I mentioned earlier, throughout the whole semester. That’s typically what that looks like, is you’re joining a session via Zoom, and sometimes it’s on campus, but obviously, this past semester, we couldn’t do it on campus after the pandemic hit.

But it’s an opportunity for you to meet with that employer. And you can ask questions and talk with them one-on-one. Most of them will say, “Please follow up with me if you have questions.” So that’s fantastic, to be able to follow up with an employer one-on-one, especially if it’s an employer that you’re interested in, interested in pursuing a career there. So those are highly effective for meeting with employers and networking, and we do a ton of them throughout the year.

Devin Lueddeke:

Great. Thanks for that, Bryce. And Gael, you mentioned this briefly, a comment before about Handshake. For those that are uninitiated, can you explain a little bit more about that?

Gael Meraud:

Yeah, absolutely. So Handshake is basically our go-to resource for all of our services and resources. And so I mentioned that students can schedule advising appointments that are convenient for them. During this time, they can do that 24/7. They can also RSVP for these types of employer info sessions and recruiting events that Bryson’s talking about. They are able to also just access all of our online subscription resources. So we pay for a number of online resources in various fields to help further your knowledge and give you access to job boards and personalized advice towards specific career paths. So you’re able to access all of that as well.

Interestingly, it’s also a community-based platform, so there’s a lot of peer-to-peer sharing of advice or best practices from each other, and also sharing experiences from maybe interning with a particular organization, and you can share your experience on what that was like, or even working with a particular organization. So that is pretty much Handshake in a nutshell.

Devin Lueddeke:

Excellent. Thanks for that. And Gael, just to stick with you, one of the questions that have come in through the chat, have students been able to get paid internships abroad? And I think it might’ve been answered in the chat as well, but if you could address that, that’d be great.

Gael Meraud:

Sure. And this actually might be a little bit better for Bryce to address, since he’s working with the employers as well. I think in the short answer is yes, there are still many paid remote internship opportunities. It may differ according to the degree program and the career fields and how they’re being impacted, to the types of opportunities that are available, both whether that means abroad or paid versus unpaid. So I think I’ll rely on the advisors to perhaps give some of the landscape of what that looks like for your particular programs in the chat. But the short answer is yes, there are still some of those opportunities available. And Bryce, if there’s anything you’d like to add, please feel free.

Bryce Craft:

Yeah. I just want to add that you nailed it. Absolutely right. Yes.

Devin Lueddeke:

Excellent. And of course, there are also the… I shouldn’t say dreaded, but dreaded unpaid internships. And so in that case, where there’s a great opportunity for an organization that you really want to work with establish that network with, it’s an investment in the future, of course, but does MIIS offer any funding or support in case of an unpaid internship?

Gael Meraud:

Yes. So, absolutely. We’re fortunate to be able to offer an immersive professional learnings fund that they have… There’s also been an emergency fund that was put out. I can’t remember the total thousands and thousands of dollars that were gathered, perhaps you guys remember. But basically, that went to help really support students’ immediate needs, giving them access to [inaudible 00:19:27] equipment and that kind of a thing in order to be able to learn remotely from home. But it also went to supporting immersive learning opportunities and funding internship opportunities. So that is a resource that is available. On the immersive learning professional learning website, you will see other types of opportunities and a lot of information about what that looks like, so perhaps somebody could put that in the chat as well for us.

Devin Lueddeke:

Great. And then Gael, this is related to kind of what happened this past semester. But for students that are incoming, how will advising look for new students if it’s remote this fall?

Gael Meraud:

Sure. Okay. Well, we got a test run this spring. We’ve been able to get up and running. So if we end up advising remotely in the fall, we’re already well equipped to be able to handle the basics of what we do; the advising, the info sessions, the workshops, all of those things that we’ve spoken to. But we’re also really trying to seek out new initiatives to support this type of learning. So in our planning committee, for the summer, we’re going to be talking about how we might want to revamp orientation and all of that career management foundation skillsets that I mentioned too earlier, that we’re going to really work on with you there.

We’re going to change the way we do it. If we’re not in person, we’re going to really look to see how might we expand on that, so that is, if there are synchronous opportunities for you to connect with your peers, but also some reflection that you can do individually offline, so you’re not just in front of a computer the whole time. We’ll be definitely using some of those breakout room, so that we can provide more small group, individualized kind of advice. So that’s still in the works, but we’re having all of those types of conversations to really expand on what we’re doing. We’re actually quite excited about that opportunity.

Devin Lueddeke:

Awesome. Thank you for that. And Bryce, here’s a question for you. How fast is the employment turnover when graduating from the translation and localization management program? What do the job prospects look like for this after graduation?

Bryce Craft:

Yeah, that’s a great question. And I think with any program, it’s all over the board. We have students who already have their full-time jobs locked up before they graduate, and some, it may take a couple more months, or maybe for some of them, they did an internship the previous summer before they graduated, and then the employer says, “Okay, when you graduate next year, you have a full-time job.” So I would say up to this point… And maybe Eddie or Winnie, you can correct me in the chat if I’m wrong, but up to this point, it’s been pretty quick. We have an annual TILM career fair in Monterrey, and this year we were lucky enough to get it right before the pandemic hit. And we usually have between 30 and 40 employers from all over the world come and attend this career fair.

In addition to that, we regularly have the recruiting sessions from our employers. And some of the employers have gotten really smart to start recruiting early from MIIS, because that the talent it’s very competitive to get, especially being so close to Silicone Valley. So you have Facebook, you have SoundHound and other employers, Salesforce… And please include the other ones, Eddie and Winnie, down below too, that are recruiting very early in the fall to lock up their interns and then also lock up full-time employees. So it’s really all over the board, but… So I don’t have an exact answer for that. And I know Eddie and Winnie are probably going to add something in the chat. But I would say up to this point, it’s been pretty quick. Thank you.

Devin Lueddeke:

Awesome. Just to stay on a similar theme, can people do paid internships with organizations during the school year? Obviously, remote or in-person.

Bryce Craft:

Absolutely. Absolutely. Take advantage of opportunities. Like I said, utilize every resource that you can while you’re a student. And I’ve been seeing a lot of the questions flash across my screen. You guys are asking amazing questions, I’m like, “Why didn’t I think of that when I was a student?” These are all fantastic questions that are coming across, so please keep on firing them away. And if you’re being a little shy to ask questions, ask. But to answer your question again, absolutely you can do volunteer opportunities, projects, paid internships, unpaid internships, what have you, during the semester. Just keep in mind, you want to make sure you get your work done too and have time to study, so don’t overload yourself too much.

Devin Lueddeke:

Great. And then sticking with the internship theme, how early could one practically begin an internship search for next summer? And how early are employers typically open to discussing summer possibilities?

Bryce Craft:

Yeah, it’s highly competitive. So they start in the fall. We have a career fair in early September, and this year I’m looking at setting a date at either September 1st or September 3rd. I know this is kind of news to everybody, I just came up with the date yesterday. So there you go. But that’s what I’m looking at, September first or third, and those employers are already looking for summer interns. Some are looking for spring interns. But it’s pretty quick, as I mentioned to you before, too. With the Facebook example, the Salesforce example, they’ll start looking for their interns in the fall as well. So it’s pretty quick.

And what I want to make sure that I stress again is meeting with your advisor. Once you go through orientation, you’ll get a good idea of how to prepare; practicing your introduction, making sure your LinkedIn profile is up to date, all those little things you can do, your resume review and connecting with your career advisor, so you can feel fully prepared when that first career fair hits, or those first recruiting sessions start coming in and you’re attending and you can ask educated questions and then connect with that employer and start to network. You can be confident in networking. And the advisors cover all the topics during orientation.

Devin Lueddeke:

Great. Thanks for that. And Bryce, earlier, you mentioned that the hiring climate is actually… it seems still encouraging, with 80% the organizations still hiring in some capacity. And so do you have any insights into kind of the early returns on the May 2020 graduates? How are they navigating the crisis, or how has your team been able to help?

Bryce Craft:

Yeah, that’s a great question. Well, I think it’s probably a little bit more challenging, because everything just hit like that for these students, they weren’t able to prepare for a pandemic. But we are seeing them still find jobs across all programs, as I mentioned. And the key is, again, and I know I keep on saying this, but I want to make sure you understand it, they are taking advantage of all their resources. They are meeting regularly with their career advisors, they’re doing regular resume reviews, mock interviews, prepare in any way they can for opportunities, connecting with their advisors to do networking, to look for opportunities to connect with alumni, to connect with industry professionals.

They’re attending the recruiting sessions, they are, in some cases, following up with me after a recruiting session to see if it’s okay to connect with that employer, or following up with their advisor. Again, it’s utilizing all those resources, making sure that they have… their account is live and active on Handshake, doing everything necessary, again, to sharpen those tools and utilize all the tools that are in our toolbox.

Devin Lueddeke:

Excellent. And Gael, a question for you. And I think this is related to pandemic, but also what’s going on in the world with Black and people of Color in the communities, and dehumanization, systemic racism that’s really being uncovered and brought to the forefront today. So are there ways in which we can look at our potential employers to keep them accountable? Do we look at mission statements or have our students looked into that as well to make sure that employers that we’re working with are doing the right thing?

Gael Meraud:

Well, I will certainly start off with this, it’s extremely important to us. I do think though, that Bryce will have some really important information to share in the same regard. It’s interesting, just actually earlier this morning, I shared with our team some new resources that I came across around organizations who are hiring, focused on diversity hiring in particular, as well as job search boards and resources for people of Color. The advisors themselves, we tailor our advice according to whatever strengths and obstacles face an individual person, whether that comes from a lack of experience or encountering issues of prejudice, or maybe even having too much experience, from their perspective, in terms of transitioning into a new career.

So we tailor our advice to the individual person, and we are committed to doing everything to support that person. At this time, we are also connecting with a lot of industry thought leaders to share resources on how can we, in particular, support people of Color? And I’m really proud too, that we are part of Handshake right now, because Handshake’s entire mission is dedicated to democratizing opportunity for our students. And they are, right now, asking these very questions of, how can we create increased opportunity for our students of Color? And in fact, I don’t even think I’ve had a chance to share this with the team yet, because in the next month, they’re going to be rolling out new services to really help increase and expand opportunity for our students. So really fortunate that we are working with them. Bryce, in terms of how we keep tabs on employers and how they’re treating our students, perhaps you could say a little bit more about that.

Bryce Craft:

Yeah, absolutely. Well, our student body is very diverse, obviously, and we work with a diverse number of employers. And to this point, since I’ve been here, I haven’t had to blacklist any employers that have treated our students poorly due to race or gender. It has been because they’ve broken some employment laws in some way, and it hasn’t been many. We really do have employer partners who we work with. The one or two employers that, again, I’ve had to say, “Hey, we can’t work with you,” again, it has been because they’ve broken employment laws as far as payment. We want to make sure you get paid. As Devin pointed out, we want you to get paid. We are advocates for all of you to get paid for everything you do.

So we have a diverse set of employers. I think they respect our student body. And again, we work with partners here. We usually don’t work with just random employers here and there, we make sure that I try to build that bridge with the employer to know it is a partnership. And I think they appreciate that, and I think that’s why they continue to come back to MIIS to recruit our students. A lot of it is that partnerships that we have formed because of all of you and your level of talent. So yeah.

Devin Lueddeke:

Okay. Thank you. And just a change of gear. Obviously, a number of our students take advantage of really notable fellowships, Bone, Fulbright. And Gael, how do advisors assist students when they’re crafting proposals for those types of fellowships?

Gael Meraud:

Yeah, absolutely. Well, Elizabeth Bone is not only our NPTs advisor, but has also worked closely with Bone, in particular, because it involves a lot of security careers. Various advisors though, for many of us, in many different programs, have worked on the fellowship panels to be able to really assist students in their application materials, their statements, but also their interviewing skills. So we take that very, very seriously. In fact, as a center, we have partnered with our faculty director of fellowships, and we support all of his operational work to promote fellowship opportunities, including workshops and advising to really help you be as successful as possible.

Devin Lueddeke:

Great. Excellent. And another question has just come in, more about basically local opportunities, ways to make money to help afford grad school, living in Monterey. So for local jobs, can you help us find weekend jobs such as bartending, et cetera, to help pay for rent? And I’ll jump in just for a moment. I welcome you to add to this. But we do have a lot of students taking advantage of opportunities within the local community, as well as on campus, with graduate assistantships. I’d say that in my experience, the graduate assistantships or on-campus work study ends up being a lot of opportunities, and probably more understanding of the academic schedule than the local service industry job might. But on the other hand, the latter can be very lucrative here in Monterey. So there are a lot of opportunities that exist. I know it’s a little outside of the scope of your team, but if there’s any anecdotes that you might add, I’m sure folks would be all-ears.

Bryce Craft:

Yeah, I can jump in here. As far as our career platform goes, with Handshake and posting opportunities, we typically do not post retail opportunities. However, as Devin pointed out, MIIS students do take advantage of everything that’s around here, and there is a lot. And so some of these employers will regularly hire MIIS students. And they understand the requirements of the curriculum in your coursework, and so a lot of it will be weakened jobs. We’ve had students work at Trader Joe’s, Chipotle, to serving wine on the weekends at all the wineries that are here. So if you’re a fan of wine interview, there is a ton of wineries here. And they understand the level of talent that you are, and a lot of them will seek MIIS students to work there, because they understand you’re ethical, you’re incredibly intelligent and talented, so they will seek you for that. But there are plenty of opportunities to do that.

And one of the things I do beyond that too… With the career fair at the beginning of the year, a lot of those employers are local employers, from nonprofits to language companies, all programs. There is about three or four employers for each program, usually, at that career fair, and a lot of them are local.

Devin Lueddeke:

Excellent. Thanks for that. And one question that has come in just recently, how common is it for speakers in a student’s respective field to come in and give talks about their path towards employment in their career? And the question is for in general, but also specifically for language services industry. And I think Winnie has probably helped address the latter half of that. But maybe generally, is that common? Can you speak a little bit more about that?

Gael Meraud:

Sure. I feel like Bruce and I could probably both speak to this, so I was waiting to see who would jump in. Yeah, absolutely. We do this in a variety of ways. We have a variety of sort of platforms to connect our employers and our professionals with our students. Our career management class that I had mentioned earlier is one really great example of this, where our advisors do a really great job getting professionals out there. Whether they’re employers, whether they’re alumni professionals who have the types of career paths that are of interest to our students, they’re really good at bringing them into the classroom. And it usually is, actually, virtually, simply because they’re scattered all over the world.

And so that’s been a wonderful opportunity to hear from different professionals, firsthand, what their advice is. Also, of course, I wish to turn it over to Bryce for this part. There are various panels as well, and blogs and podcasts and other ways of connecting employer insights to students. But Bryce, perhaps you could talk more about just the info sessions and that kind of a thing and what your schedule looks like.

Bryce Craft:

Yeah. As far as a number of goes, I would say, gosh, on average, per year, we have probably about 40 different recruiting sessions, and those are the ones that we’re scheduling during the week. I think last year, we had approximately 60 or 70. So we have regular recruiting sessions. And my whole goal with that, as I mentioned before, is to get that employer in front of you, get them to talk about their career path, kind of where and how they got to the position that they’re in now, because I know a lot of you want to be in that position.

But then also, talk about what they’re looking for in candidates, any opportunities they have at their employer, to give any advice, answer all the questions. I want to make sure that that employer has given you the whole picture, so you feel prepared. And again, we’re doing it regularly, so you’re going to get just perspectives from a diverse number of employers and opportunities. And again, another goal with that is for me and our advisors to help you become aware of everything that’s out there, and that’s why we do that.

Devin Lueddeke:

Excellent. Thanks for that. I’ve got a tough question, and this wasn’t from the audience, this is from me. But what do you think, or can you predict what the job opportunities will look like kind of post pandemic? Any insights into that? Because I think many of the folks listening to this call will probably be… well, will be graduating in a post pandemic world.

Gael Meraud:

Well, I’ll open that up, but I definitely would like to hear Bryce’s thoughts, as well as the advisors chiming in, about any specific information they have that’s more program-relevant. Of course, it is the million dollar question, and I certainly don’t know what’s going to happen. It’s very interesting in trying to follow this, because the economists say different things. Some economists believe that because this is a manufactured recession, that it’s going to turn around. As soon as things open up again, that the job market is just going to bounce right back, while other economists think this is going to have a longterm impact.

I think regardless of… Probably like anything, it’s going to be some combination of both, but I think the key is that it’s not… We’re not really going to go back to how things were before. I think right now employers are forced to change the recruiting strategies, and they’re learning from that, and they’re learning what is working better. In fact, in many cases, there is more opportunity to recruit diverse students, because everything is open now to everybody. So I think that there’s a lot about diversity and inclusion opportunities in this kind of an environment. But yeah, everybody is learning and growing.

And sorry, I don’t have a better answer. I think that the point is… So for the last recession in 2008, 65% of the jobs that were in existence went away and never came back. But that also means that it was replaced by 65% with new jobs that we don’t really even… that are currently evolving as we speak. So the point is to be open-minded and should be keeping your tabs on, how are the needs in the market changing, and what are the opportunities that are arising? So that you can adapt and hone your skills to meet those opportunities.

Bryce Craft:

Yeah, I will agree with all that. And one, we don’t know what’s going to happen. But I think companies… What we’re seeing right now is companies are adjusting. And they’re adjusting in ways that, I think, is giving them access in some cases to more talent, right? To more talent that they thought they wouldn’t be able to access before, because before they were hiring talent to come work at their vocation, their offices, and maybe they only had reach to local talent or talent willing to come to the office there, and now they’re able to access these remote employees, and they’re learning, “Hey, you know what? It works to have remote employees.”

And in my opinion, this is a great time to go to graduate school. Not that I’m trying to sell you on going to graduate school, but I’ll tell you my own experience, the reason why I went to graduate school is in 2008, I was working for Yahoo. I know they’re still at yahoo.com, but they used to be a bigger company, a bigger tech company and the 2008 downturn hit, and a ton of us got laid off, I think, 100,000 of us or something like that got laid off, and I was part of that. And so that really pushed me. That was really the catalyst for me going to graduate school and getting my MBA.

And I’m glad I have that, because even with layoffs or anything else, that’s something nobody can ever take away from me. And the skills I gained from that have enabled me to get to where I am now, serving this great school, MIIS, as director of employee relations. And it really is a dream job. I spent a lot of my years working in the employment industry, and the opportunity to come back and work with this talent pool, which is all of you, that is a dream. So, again, I just think it’s a great time to go back to grad school. Again, I think employers are learning how to adjust, and we don’t know what’s going to happen, because, as Gael mentioned, you have one group saying it’s going to come back like that, and another group saying, “Well, it could get bad.”

But the key is, again, that we’re doing everything we can to stay in front of the employers and to have the employer stay in front of you and staying on top of their hiring needs and still offering all of the opportunities and the resource for you to prepare for a job opportunity. Again, whether it’s a resume review, mock interview, job search, what have you.

Devin Lueddeke:

Great, thanks for that. Appreciate it. And this is, I guess, slightly off topic of careers and internships. But Gael, I know you’re in the CACS team, plays a really active role in kind of kicking off the experience here at the institute with a new student orientation, welcome week. So I know you alluded to that, but it’d be great to hear a little bit more about that. And then we do get questions about course registration and when that will typically happen, so if you could address that as well, I think that would be helpful.

Gael Meraud:

Sure. I’ll just address it high level and then if there are more specific questions that come in, I’m happy to answer those. But advisors right now are working with their program chairs to really kind of fine-tune that recommendation of what classes make sense to take in your first semester. And so they’ll be communicating you through my community platform. For the most part, you should all be part of that platform, and you can certainly follow up with Devin if you’re not. But in any case, they’ll be able to share with you basically a… It’s typically what we do, is a recorded presentation, so that you can really understand what your degree requirements are, and then with specific advice to really help you focus on what classes you might take in your first semester.

And then during orientation, I talked a little bit already about the career programming that we do to lay that foundation for your career success in the very beginning, but we also do sessions on what we call registration-ready in the past, just making sure that you feel like you have all the skillsets of… When I mean skillsets, I really mean the knowledge of what it is that you need to be signing up for in that first semester, you know what you need to do in order to register, and any specialized questions that you have. So you’ll see programming offered on that note as well. And then once you get all of that information, that’s when you are better equipped as orientation week comes to a close. I believe that last day of orientation week is August 21st, if I’m not mistaken. That’s when you’ll actually register for classes. And by that point, you’ll have all the information that you need to actually feel confident in your registration.

Devin Lueddeke:

Great. Excellent. Well, thank you for addressing that. I think that’s also helpful to hear. So it appears questions that have slowed. I’m really hopeful that we got to all of them, either addressing them verbally or via chat. And thank you to all of the advisors for being so active in the chat. There’s a lot to try to keep up with. So again, hopefully, I didn’t miss too much. And I’d like to thank everyone for participating today. It’s really great to have everyone participating in these online discussions. I’m going to drop the link again. One of the first post was the meet-the-team link, but that will also give you contact information for the advising team, so you can reach out with further questions, of course. Any closing comments, Gael or Bryce?

Gael Meraud:

I have one. It’s a little bit cheesy, but it’s true. You’ve probably heard me say this, actually, if you attended our getting started at MISS presentation during preview day. But we are so proud to work with the high caliber sort of dedicated students that attend the institute who are committed to making a meaningful impact in the world. And it’s really what motivates us as advisors, it’s what makes our jobs meaningful. And so I just wanted to let you know that we are all committed to doing everything possible to contribute to your success.

Devin Lueddeke:

Great. Thank you so much. And thanks everyone for watching. Before we go, there was a question about the plans for fall, and I know the administration is still actively working on that, and actually I’m expecting at least an interim update to come this week, maybe as soon as tomorrow. So stay tuned for that as well. But thank you all for participating, and I hope you have a great evening.

Bryce Craft:

Good night, everybody.

Gael Meraud:

Bye.