Newsroom

April 28, 1999

1999 Middlebury College Public Service Leadership Awards

More than 30 Middlebury College students received citations of commendation for volunteer work in the Addison County community at the College's annual Public Service Leadership Award dinner held on Tuesday, April 27. Of the students who received the certificates of merit, six were selected for special recognition and received the 1999 Public Service Leadership Award.

The award-winning students will choose six non-profit organizations to receive $400 donations, made by the College on each student's behalf. The other students honored at the dinner will select organizations to receive a $200 donation. Donations on behalf of the students will amount to a total of $7,600.

It is estimated that half of the College's students have been engaged in community service projects or service-related initiatives this year. More than 300 students are involved in ongoing projects, providing a minimum of two hours per week for dozens of agencies and individuals, amounting to more than 15,000 hours of student volunteer effort per year-the equivalent of more than seven people working for the needs of the community full-time, year-round.

The award-winners received the 1999 Public Service Leadership Award's "Plaque of Appreciation," and have had their names engraved on a service recognition plaque to be permanently hung in Middlebury College's McCullough Student Center. Award recipients were seniors Matthew Bak, of Northampton, Mass., for his volunteerism with the Town of Middlebury Department of Parks and Recreation's youth basketball league; Eleanor Brown, of Natick, Mass., for her work with the Middlebury College Campus Girl Scouts and Middlebury's Brownie Troop # 656; Murray Harris, of Palo Alto, Calif., for his volunteerism as an emergency medical technician for the Middlebury Volunteer Ambulance Association; Cinda Scott, of Olean, N.Y., for her work as a Community Friend with the Counseling Service of Addison County and for founding the Middlebury College PALANA Kids program; Katherine Stone, of Bethesda, Md., who also worked with the Middlebury College Campus Girl Scouts and Middlebury's Brownie Troop # 656; and first-year student Heidi Crockett, of Tulsa, Okla., for her volunteerism for the Champlain Valley Agency on Aging's Neighbor to Neighbor Program.

At the dinner, President John McCardell told honorees that the public service aspect of student life ranks among the most noteworthy achievements. He said, "You join a lengthening line of Middlebury students embodying the values of volunteer service, a tradition that has become one of the most respected on campus. Through your efforts, the lives of people throughout the broad community in which we live are improved."

Keynote speaker for the dinner was Frances K. Moseley, former president and CEO of the Boys and Girls Club of Boston. She spoke of a shift in public service as it moves into the 21st century, commenting that "a revolutionized evolutionary return to the Peace Corps days of the 60s and 70s" is taking place. "It is no longer acceptable to do for others. Today we are doing with others," Moseley said.

Each year in February or March, a call for nominations goes out to the community to begin the selection process for the award. Decisions are based upon students' demonstrated dedication to a cause, level of help toward making a positive change for an individual or for the community, and initiative toward increasing the awareness and involvement of other Middlebury College students in public service. Each nomination was returned to the Student Activities Office and reviewed by a committee of College students, faculty, and staff.

To follow: a list of the nominees, and bio-sketches of award-winners and the guest speaker Frances K. Moseley

1999 Middlebury College Public Service Leadership Award Nominees:

Matthew J. Bak, Class of 1999

Over the past four years, Matt has coached for the Town of Middlebury's Department of Parks and Recreation in the youth basketball program.

Sarah J. Borch, Class of 1999

Through the Counseling Service of Addison County's Community Friends program, Sarah has volunteered since 1996 as a companion to a young woman with developmental disabilities.

Eleanor K. Brown, Class of 1999

Elly is co-leader of Middlebury Brownie Troop # 656, which she founded with classmate Katherine Stone in 1996. She also co-founded the Middlebury College Campus Girl Scouts.

Christopher S. Clark, Class of 2000

Chris has served as an emergency medical technician on the Middlebury Volunteer Ambulance Association for the past two years.

Heidi M. Crockett, Class of 2002

Heidi has provided assistance and companionship to an elderly woman in the Champlain Valley Agency on Aging's Neighbor to Neighbor Program.

Julie C. Crosby, Class of 2000

Julie has served as a mentor and College liaison in partnership with the One More Step Program and the Patricia A. Hannaford Career Center.

Carina D. Curnow, Class of 1999

Carina served over the past two years as a mentor and College liaison in partnership with the One More Step Mentoring Program and the Middlebury Union Middle School.

Glenn W. F. Edwards, Class of 1999

Glenn has been a leader of the Middlebury College Volunteer Services Organization for the past four years, and is currently the vice president. He is also co-chair for the Middlebury College

Volunteer Preview orientation program.

Brenda A. Fraire, Class of 2000

Brenda volunteered for the nursing staff at the Emergency Room of the Porter Medical Center.

Senake Gajameragedara, Class of 1999

Through the Counseling Service of Addison County's Community Friend program, Senake has volunteered as a "big brother" to an area youth for more than a year.

Stacey A. Gorski, Class of 1999

Stacey volunteered over the past three years with the Counseling Service of Addison County as a Community Friend to a twelve-year-old girl.

Jaymie B. Gross, Class of 2001

During this past academic year, Jaymie served on the United Way of Addison County's Youth Council.

Jessica L. Harper, Class of 2001

Jessica volunteered at the Elm Street Group Home for developmentally disabled women during Winter Term as a Community Associate with the Counseling Service of Addison County.

C. Murray Harris, Class of 1999

Murray volunteered for the Middlebury Volunteer Ambulance Association while at Middlebury College. He collaborated with Porter Medical Center on paramedic protocols, and served on several other rescue squads.

Elizabeth R. Herman, Class of 1999

Elizabeth has been a leader of the Middlebury College Volunteer Services Organization for the past four years, and is currently the president. She is also co-chair for the Middlebury College Volunteer Preview orientation program.

Nicole G. Hoeksma, Class of 2001

Nikki is a founding member of the United Way of Addison County's Youth Council.

Kate M. Landis, Class of 1999

Kate has volunteered as Middlebury College's liaison with Addison County Women in Crisis. She also participated on the Sexual Assault Response Team, and in the annual Take Back the Night event.

Meredith G. Livoti, Class of 2001

Meredith has served as an activity aid for the past two years with Elderly Services' Project Independence. She has also worked to recruit more Middlebury student volunteers.

Lisa N. Mase, Class of 2001

Lisa volunteered this Winter Term with Habitat for Humanity in Taos, New Mexico.

D. Andrew McBeth, Class of 1999

Andy has been a firefighter with the Middlebury Volunteer Fire Department for over two years.

Karen E. Moore, Class of 1999

Karen volunteered for Students of Human Ecology, a part of Vermont's Community Health Assessment, to help provide health care information to local families.

Jason J. Price, Class of 1999

For the past year, Jason has volunteered for the Addison County Community Action Group. He is also a Community Friend for the Counseling Service of Addison County.

Elizabeth Ransom, Class of 2001

Effie volunteers weekly at The Sheldon Museum in Middlebury, working independently to inventory the objects in many of the exhibits.

Megan E. Reilly, Class of 1999

For the last four years, Megan has helped St. Mary's Parish on numerous projects in the community and on campus. She is also a Community Friend with the Counseling Service of Addison County.

Cinda P. Scott, Class of 1999

Cinda served on the Counseling Service of Addison County's Community Friend program. She also founded the PALANA Kids program to bring Middlebury College students of color together with transracial families in the community.

Katherine L. Stone, Class of 1999

Kate is co-leader of Middlebury Brownie Troop # 656, which she founded with classmate Eleanor Brown in 1996. She also co-founded the Middlebury College Campus Girl Scouts.

Christopher M. Sullivan, Class of 2000

Chris has volunteered for the Middlebury Union High School Learning Lab. He has also served in the Volunteer Services Organization on many other projects.

Kathryn R. Walker, Class of 1999

Kate has volunteered for Addison County Woman in Crisis over the last four years, and is currently one of the board of directors and a community relations advisor.

Sohail Yousufi, Class of 2000

Sohail is a founding member of the United Way of Addison County's Youth Council.

Junaid Ziauddin, Class of 1999

Junaid is a founding member of the United Way of Addison County's Youth Council.

The Middlebury College Women's Basketball Team

The team paired up with students at Weybridge Elementary School to work on writing and reading projects. Participating team members were Lauren Amen '02, Julianne Frisbie '02, Christine Huwer '02, Heather Langlois '00, Kristy Laramee '01, Megan McCosker '01, Kelly McCarthy '99, Alyssa Pappas '00, Chrissy Peterson '99, Riann Siciak '00, Dawn Trowbridge '00, and Joanna Woldowski '99.

Middlebury College Free Burma Coalition

The coalition has raised community awareness of the people and culture of Burma, and brought local concern for Burmese human rights issues to the attention of Vermont legislators and the Burmese Embassy. Free Burma members are Corey Bills '01, Catherine Dalton '01, Katherine DeNiro '01, Nicole Lanthier '99, and Faye Leone '99.

Students Selected for Special Recognition:

Matthew J. Bak, Class of 1999

During the past four years, Matt has successfully managed a demanding pre-med curriculum and an extensive volunteer commitment to the Town of Middlebury's basketball program. He exemplifies a true sportsmanship ideal in public service. A youth league coach, Matt demonstrated that a cohesive team spirit will enhance the pursuit of one's personal best. He gave each young player equal time on court to feel the thrill of stretching individual talents, as well as the pressure to strive, under the clock, toward a united goal.

Matt's organization, dependability, and dedication provided a rewarding arena for growth and achievement. Each week, he offered three two-hour practices and scheduled additional sessions when needed. He brought other college students and parents into the program, and was a consistent, encouraging influence at every game. He gave his friendship to the players, and hosted end-of-season pizza parties to cement the positive relationships they had built as a team.

Matt's philosophy is "athletes first, winning second." He has shown his players that the measure of being successful athletes may not always be seen on the scoreboard, but will always be seen on the sidelines. As one parent said, Matt's wonderful attitude and integrity will never be forgotten by this group.

Eleanor K. Brown, Class of 1999

Elly Brown is the co-founder of Middlebury Brownie Troop # 656, and also of the Middlebury College Campus Girl Scouts. Troop # 656--the only student-led Brownie team in town--steadily increased its membership through Elly's outreach endeavors. She worked with the Vermont Council of Girl Scouts to train other student leaders so the troop can continue to grow in years to come. The Campus Scouts--the only troop at a Vermont college--is another legacy for partnership between our town and college initiated by Elly's enthusiasm.

In 1996, Elly and fellow-student Kate Stone responded to the community's need for Girl Scout leadership with commitment and energy. A dedicated leader, Elly sought volunteer projects that implanted seeds of interest to help the young girls become aware of their importance as contributors to their world. Each week during her years at Middlebury, Elly provided a fun, educational, and secure environment for the troop to explore its individual strengths, interests, and goals.

To bolster interaction and mutual appreciation between Middlebury College students and people in town, Elly worked to recruit other students, both male and female, for leadership posts in area Girl Scouts programs. She is a dynamic and entertaining role model for her Brownie troop, and for her peers on campus.

Heidi M. Crockett, Class of 2002

Sometimes the simple act of listening with genuine interest and being a friend makes a tremendous impact on the life of another. Heidi Crockett, through her compassioned volunteerism with the Champlain Valley Agency on Aging's Neighbor to Neighbor program, made that kind of difference to a woman struggling with advanced age and isolation on the outskirts of our community.

Heidi drives 30 miles each week to visit her elderly friend's mobile home in the countryside, and to offer companionship, physical assistance and immeasurable emotional support. Using a college car for their errands, lunches in town and other excursions vital to a healthful and integrated life, Heidi alleviated this person's very real separation from the outside world, and re-awakened in her the courage to trust others, to regain some control over her life, and, most importantly, to be happy.

In the words of her program coordinator, Heidi "doesn't separate 'volunteer work' from the rest of her life. Her commitment to serve is deeply ingrained … an essential part of who she is." Heidi's gentle kindness shows us all that seeking friendships beyond the typical or immediate social venues not only enriches the lives of those in isolation, but also our own.

C. Murray Harris, Class of 1999

Murray Harris has made public service a priority during his Middlebury College career. His pursuit of emergency rescue skills, and participation with the Middlebury Volunteer Ambulance Association has affected hundreds of lives. One recent occurrence of his profound contribution was at the Kenyon Arena earlier this year. Murray's skill and immediate response to a fan in crisis made all the difference to everyone there--especially to the man whose life was saved.

In his first year at Middlebury, Murray trained to be an ambulance driver and underwent basic medical instruction. The following summer, he studied with a New Hampshire program for further emergency certification, and, in his junior year, temporarily left college to seek the highest level of pre-hospital emergency training at a paramedic school out west. Determined to bring the advanced life-support measures he had learned back to the Middlebury squad, he worked with Porter Medical Center upon his return to design protocols and obtain state approval for paramedic care previously unavailable in this community.

On call 12 to 20 hours a week, Murray also serves on squads in New Hampshire on weekends, and maintains a strong academic record. Dedicated, compassionate, and heroic, Murray is an inspiration to his peers and colleagues.

Cinda P. Scott, Class of 1999

During her college years, Cinda has established new ties between local families and students through her efforts as a Community Friend with the Counseling Service of Addison County. With Middlebury College students, parents of transracially-adopted children, and the Counseling Service, she also founded the PALANA Kids program to enhance awareness of our diverse community. By bringing together transracial families and students of color, Cinda fostered an arena for sharing a broadened and mutual cultural experience.

Cinda also served as a Community Friend to an African-American girl. Her unwavering involvement strengthened the child's self-confidence and ethnic identity, and earned the love of the family. The girl's mother speaks of Cinda's lasting impact, and how her importance to the family is deeply felt.

Cinda recruited other Middlebury students into the Community Friends and PALANA Kids programs, and encouraged mentoring friendships. She helped to develop feelings of self-assurance and pride within the young people of our community, and has facilitated an essential connection between families and individuals. Cinda's leadership, vision, and initiative have set an important standard for community service.

Katherine L. Stone, Class of 1999

Kate Stone, a dedicated Girl Scout since the first grade, has been an active volunteer leader while at Middlebury College. In remarkable attention to her work here, she maintained contact even while studying abroad so she could continue to support Middlebury Brownie Troop # 656, which she founded with Elly Brown three years ago. Kate also co-founded the Middlebury College Campus Girl Scouts to enlist other strong leadership models for the younger girls, and to promote positive involvement between college students and the local community.

Kate attended all weekly troop meetings with enthusiasm, demonstrating time and again that Girl Scouting can forge friendships and create powerful opportunities for public service. She reaffirms the time-honored values: respect for elders, friendliness, consideration, strength, courage, and the responsible use of resources. Kate has promoted the interests of her young companions, and encouraged them to explore their importance as contributors to the community. Her philosophy that each individual can change the world is accompanied by a lively, effective determination to make it a reality. A generous activist and mentor, Kate has inspired others to be the same-and she has showed them how.

Guest speaker Frances K. Moseley - excerpt from Middlebury College President John McCardell's dinner speech:

It is a very distinct honor to introduce our guest speaker this evening, Frances K. Moseley. She is the former president and CEO of the Boys and Girls Clubs in Boston. A prominent figure in the Boston community, she has achieved remarkable results in her career as both a corporate executive and as head of a major nonprofit organization.

Frances Moseley is the personification of the aphorism that anything worth doing is worth doing well. She also inspires another phrase that more closely describes the way she approaches her responsibilities: be certain that, whatever course you may take in your professional life, service to others is both a personal and a professional priority.

A recent magazine article about Ms. Moseley states: "At some point, everyone who knows Frances Moseley has asked a question like: 'Where does she get the energy?' 'How does she find the time?' and 'Does she ever slow down?'"

Questions like these are understandable considering the many activities and organizations with which Ms. Moseley has been associated. She is, as I mentioned earlier, the past president and CEO of Boys and Girls Clubs in Boston. She assumed the post in 1992, leaving a corporate position at John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance. Previously, she had been consumer affairs manager with the Boston Edison Company, and associate director of promotions at WGBH-TV. She has participated on as many as 10 boards of nonprofits and corporations, including service as a trustee of the Huntington Theatre, the Massachusetts Sports Partnership, the New England Aquarium, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and the Wang Center for the Performing Arts. She is a director of PNC Bank, New England, and of Tufts Associated Health Plans, Inc. She was recently named by Boston Magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the city.

As president of Boston's Boys and Girls Clubs, Ms. Moseley was both a relentless fundraiser and a dynamic force for change. Under her leadership, the organization sharpened and expanded its mission to gain unprecedented visibility in the Boston area. The clubs now serve over 7,000 children, an increase of 2,000 since her leadership was initiated. She upped the organization's operating revenues from $3.75 million to $6.1 million. The number of clubhouse facilities expanded from three to five, serving five Greater Boston communities. The number of employees rose from 130 to over 200. A fundraising campaign to raise $775,000 actually raised $1.8 million, and attracted the largest gift ever received from living donors by a nonprofit organization in Boston: $2.6 million. Ms. Moseley aggressively pursued every opportunity to solicit financial support for her organization. At the same time, she and her husband, Monroe, also contributed generously to other charitable causes, and help plan numerous fundraising events for various organizations each year.

Frances Moseley is an energetic and effective advocate for the nonprofit sector. Her skills as a manager, an organizer and a fundraiser are legendary, and she exhibits an undying passion and dedication for helping others. We are greatly honored that she has taken time to be here this evening at Middlebury College. Please join me in welcoming our speaker, Frances K. Moseley.