Middlebury

 

Past Events

Spring 2013 Events

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This symposium builds on the Center's theme for 2012-2013: migrations, race, and ethnicity. Click on the video to hear the keynote address by novelist Dinaw Mengestu.



Spring 2012 Events

Saturday, May 12
 
Multiple events with Will Kasso, Renowned Graffiti Artist
 
Artist Lunch
Come talk about art and community, art in urban areas, the value of urban art forms (graffiti, live art), and the integration of race and ethnicity in art.   RSVP to sswilliams@middlebury.edu.
 
12:00-1:30 p.m., Carr Hall Lounge

Graffiti/Urban Art Workshop
Learn how to create some art! Or just learn what goes into making graffiti art.
 
2:00-4:00 p.m., Lower Forest (LOFO)


Verbal Onslaught Feat
Come out to watch students perform their spoken word poems accompanied by Will Kasso’s live visual creations.  He will be painting while students spit prose. Shy and Outspoken Poets, Storytellers, Writers, Artists, Listeners, Art Enthusiasts as well as Visual Artists are all welcome!
 
6:00-8:00 p.m., 51 Main

Co-sponsored with African American Alliance, Alianza, Art Department, Distinguished Men of Color, 51 Main, History of Art and Architecture Department, Office of the Dean of the College, Ross Commons, and Women of Color.

Friday, May 4

Finding Voice in the Food Movement

Weybridge House and the Middlebury College Organic Farm are hosting a dinner to discuss the food movement and how it can be broadened. Those in race, class, gender and other minorities are often excluded from this movement and the discussion will address what we can do to make it more accessible. The dinner will be very open, and many interested people will be included to participate in the conversation.

6:30 p.m., Weybridge House

Co-sponsored with Middlebury College Organic Farm, the Nutrition Outreach and Mentoring program, and Women’s and Gender Studies

Thursday, May 3

CCSRE Race and Ethnicity Reading Group meeting. Paolo Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed will be discussed.

4:30-6pm, Carr Hall Lounge

Monday, April 30

Workshop with Dr. Anita Fernández, faculty member in the Education Program, Prescott College:  Activism, race, ethnicity, education, and  language.  All are welcome.

12:15-1:30 p.m., Atwater Dining Hall 102

Monday, April 30

Anita Fernandez, faculty member in the Education program of the Resident Degree Program, Prescott College

“Forbidden Curriculum and the National Implications of Arizona's Ban on Ethnic Studies.”

Arizona has become the epicenter for anti-Latino/a legislation and discriminatory educational practices including the banning of Tucson’s successful Mexican-American Studies program.  Dr. Fernández will share her experiences with the teachers and students of this program along with an analysis of the race-based politics taking place in education across the country.  As an ethic of color-blindness continues to be perpetuated in order to legitimize attacks on anti-racist projects, academic activists are working to build national solidarity to defend and support rigorous, critical public education in the U.S.  Dr. Fernández is embedded in these efforts locally and nationally both to save Ethnic Studies in Arizona and to bring awareness to the larger neoliberal laws, policies and practices impacting education.

This presentation will include footage from Precious Knowledge, a documentary on Tucson’s Mexican American Studies program and the current civil rights battle taking place in Arizona.

4:30-6:00 p.m, Robert A. Jones ‘59 Conference Room

Co-sponsored with Alianza, Brainerd Commons, Department of History, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Education Studies Program, Latin American Studies, Linguistics Program, Rohatyn Center for International Affairs, and Women's & Gender Studies Program-Chellis House

Friday, April 27

CCSRE Scholarship Working Group Presentation

Please join us for the CCSRE Scholarship Working Group.  Linda White will share an article she is currently preparing for publication on the Japanese Family Register/koseki.  Lunch will be provided.

12:15-1;30 p.m., Carr Hall Lounge

Thursday, April 26

A Workshop by Rosita Choy

"Activism and Popular Education: An Introduction to Community Organizing across Race and Culture"

In this interactive workshop, participants will experience a simulated community meeting and gain tools to facilitate organizing with diverse communities. Principles of popular education and tools for facilitation will be introduced. It is highly recommended that participants arrive on time and stay for the entire 90 minutes since the workshop will rely on sequenced activities. This workshop will be led by Rosita Choy, former deputy director of Amnesty International's mid-Atlantic region and former national immigrant rights policy coordinator for the American Friends Service Committee. During her 13 years of nonprofit experience, she has designed workshops and trainings and facilitated discussions with grassroots organizations throughout the U.S.

4:30-6:00 p.m., The Orchard (Room 103), The Franklin Environmental Center at Hillcrest

Co-sponsored with the Education Studies Program, the Social Justice Coalition, Sunday Night Group 

Wednesday, April 25

Workshop with William Poulin-Deltour

“What’s Race Got to do with it?”

For scholars trained in the United States, researching race and ethnicity outside of the United States can be quite a challenge.  How can one observe and capture ethnic and racial relations without imposing one’s own ethnocentric American grid?  Moreover, how might this experience lead American-trained scholars to rethink taken for granted understandings of race and ethnicity within the United States?

7:00-8:30p.m., Brainerd Commons House, 132 Blinn Lane

Co-sponsored with Brainerd Commons, the Department of french, and the Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

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Thursday, April 12

CCSRE Race and Ethnicity Reading Group meeting. 

4:30-6pm in Carr Hall Lounge.

April 16

 Lecture by Professor Nayan Shah, Department of History, University of California San Diego

“Stranger Intimacy and Unsettling the History of Asia/Pacific/America”

"In exploring an array of intimacies between global migrants Nayan Shah illuminates a stunning, transient world of heterogeneous social relations--dignified, collaborative, and illicit. At the same time he demonstrates how the United States and Canada, in collusion with each other, actively sought to exclude and dispossess nonwhite races. Stranger Intimacy: Contesting Race, Sexuality, and the Law in the North American West reveals the intersections between capitalism, the state's treatment of immigrants, sexual citizenship, and racism in the first half of the twentieth century."

12:15 p.m., Mitchell Greene Lounge

Co-sponsored with the American Studies Mellon Foundation Global Action Fund, and the Women and Gender Studies Program

Monday April 16

Talk by Professor Jeffrey Ehrenreich, Department of Anthropology, University of New Orleans

“The Black (Mardi Gras) Indians: Ethnographic and Photographic Fieldwork among the Big Chiefs, Queens, Spyboys, Flagboys, and Wildmen of New Orleans”

Jeffrey Ehrenreich, University of New Orleans, will show his photos and talk about the Mardi Gras Indians, with whom he has been working for more than a decade.  Topics will include the origins and history of the tribes, their masks, music, rituals and performances.

7:30-9:00 p.m., Axinn 229 

Co-sponsored with the Dance Program, the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, and Women and Gender Studies Program.

Tuesday, April 10

 Lecture by Julieta Paredes, Aymara Activist

 “Communitarian Feminism.”

Julieta Paredes Carvajal is an Aymara woman, communitarian lesbian feminist, co-founder of Mujeres Creando (Women Creating) and the Community of women creating community as well as the Communitarian Feminist Assembly. She lives in La Paz, Bolivia, land where a political change process is underway. She is an anti-patriarchal feminist activist, writer, singer, author and poet, and has been involved in feminist training with indigenous and working class women throughout Bolivia and in other parts of Latin America. She has previously given presentations and performances at New York University, Swarthmore College, Bryn Mawr College, Northwestern University and UC Berkeley.  She has also presented at several Latin American Feminist Conferences, as well as in Barcelona and Madrid. 

6:00-7:15 p.m., Robert A. Jones ‘59 Conference Room

Co-sponsored with Department of Spanish and Portuguese and Women's and Gender Studies Program.

Tuesday, April 10

“An African Election”

Film screening with Independent film maker Jarreth Merz.

A film about Ghana's 2008 peaceful democratic election, an exception on a continent of fraudulent elections and post-electoral crises.  Jarreth Merz's message is that this particular election, despite all its challenges, begins to show Africans as capable of good governance in a liberal democratic sense.

 7:30 pm, Robert A. Jones Conference Room

 Co-sponsored with the Department of Political Science, International Studies – African Studies, Umoja (Middlebury College African Organization)

Friday, April 6

International Studies Colloquium lunchtime presentation by Yumna Siddiqi, Associate Professor of English & American Literatures

“It’s a Question of My Dignity”: Narratives of Immigrant Workers in Montreal

12:15 p.m., Robert A. Jones ’59 House conference room

Lunch will be provided for those who RSVP by Tuesday, April 3 by calling 802-443-5324.

Co-sponsored with the Rohaytn Center for International Affairs

Monday, April 9

Lecture by Dr. Judith Flores Carmona, Hampshire College

Recognizing the Precious Knowledge and Cultural Wealth in Communities of Color”

The perspectives and insights about diverse ethnic, racial and gender communities contained in the works banned in Tucson, Arizona, cultivate in students an appreciation for difference and diversity, knowledge of wide-ranging ideas and fearlessness in engaging with the ideas of others to achieve nuevos conocimientos/new knowledges. The removal of books amounts to censorship and furthermore undermines the presence of students of color and their communities as holders and producers of knowledge. Research has shown that a multicultural-diverse education that promotes critical thinking and addresses the history and identity of ethnic minorities in fact closes the achievement gap between white students and students of color.

7:00-8:30 p.m., Forest East Lounge

Co-sponsored with Alianza, Cook Commons, Education Studies Program, The Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Wednesday, April 4

A lecture by Bill Fletcher, Senior Scholar for the Institute for Policy Studies

"Re-thinking Occupation: Labor and Race in Today's American Social Movements."

Bill Fletcher, Jr., is a longtime labor, racial justice and international activist. He is an Editorial Board member and columnist for BlackCommentator.com and a Senior Scholar for the Institute for Policy Studies in Washington, DC. He is the immediate past president of TransAfrica Forum and a founder of the Black Radical Congress.

Fletcher got his start in the labor movement as a rank and file member of the Industrial Union of Marine and Shipbuilding Workers of America. Combining labor and community work, he was also involved in ongoing efforts to desegregate the Boston building trades. He later served in leadership and staff positions in District 65-United Auto Workers, National Postal Mail Handlers Union and Service Employees International Union (SEIU).

4:30 p.m., McCardell Bicentennial Hall 216

Co-sponsored with the Department of Political Science, the Department of Sociology/ Anthropology.

Tuesday, April 3

 A lecture by Django Paris, Michigan State University

“Language across Difference: Toward Culturally Sustaining Pedagogies in Changing Urban Schools”

In this talk Paris offers his ethnographic and sociolinguistic research with Latina/o, African American, and Pacific Islander students in changing urban communities as a window into possibilities for what he calls culturally sustaining pedagogies—teaching and learning that moves beyond cultural relevance or responsiveness and toward sustaining our multilingual and multiethnic present and future.  Drawing on humanizing studies of youth language, literacy, and culture in the urban West and Southwest, Paris offers a portrait of young people of color enacting new and old visions of ethnic and linguistic difference through peer conversations, text messages, and youth authored rap lyrics.  He argues that understanding the intersection of ethnicity, language, and identity in youth spaces inside and outside classrooms has the potential to inform teaching for cultural and educational justice.

4:30-6:00 p.m., Axinn 103

Co-sponsored with the Department of English and American Literatures, Education Studies Program, Office of the Dean of the College, Office of the Provost, and Wonnacott Commons.

Tuesday, April 3

Brown Bag Talk by Django Paris, Michigan State University

12:15-1:30 p.m., Carr Hall Lounge

Co-sponsored with the Department of English and American Literatures, Education Studies Program, Office of the Dean of the College, Office of the Provost, and Wonnacott Commons.

Tuesday, March 20

ACLU lawyer and Middlebury alum Dennis Parker ’77

“Implicit Bias: How Unconscious Prejudice Undermines the American Dream.”

This talk will explore the role of the unconscious in shaping the way we relate to people based on race, gender, national origin, sexual orientation, etc. and the effect that that reaction may have on equal access to opportunity.

4:30-6:00 p.m., Axinn 229

Dennis D. Parker is the Director of the ACLU National Office's Racial Justice Program (RJP). Concentrating on issues of  the school-to-prison pipeline which funnels children of color from the educational system into the criminal justice system, racial profiling, affirmative action, indigent representation and felon enfranchisement and predatory lending, the RJP seeks to remove barriers to equal opportunity for communities of color through litigation, public education, community organizing and legislation.

Prior to joining the ACLU, he was the Chief of the Civil Rights Bureau of the Office of  the New York State Attorney. Mr. Parker also worked for fourteen years at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund litigating and supervising the litigation of scores of cases involving elementary and secondary education, affirmative action in higher education and equal educational opportunity. Other positions included work at the employment firm of Vladeck, Waldman, Elias and Engelhardt and the New York Legal Aid Society, Criminal Defense Division in Brooklyn, New York. He has published a book and numerous chapters and articles on a range of civil rights issues including housing discrimination, educational equity, affirmative action and testing.

Mr. Parker lectures extensively on civil rights issues and is an adjunct professor at New York Law School. He is a graduate of Middlebury College and Harvard Law School.

Co-sponsored with the Center for Education in Action, and the Office of the Dean of the College.

Monday, March 19

ACLU lawyer and Middlebury alum Dennis Parker ’77

Brown Bag Lunch Discussion: “Racial Justice and Immigration”

12:15-1:30 p.m., Carr Hall Lounge

 

Monday, March 19

 

ACLU lawyer and Middlebury alum Dennis Parker ’77

Career Conversation: “Public Interest Law, ACLU, and Racial Justice Work”

5:00-6:30 p.m., Carr Hall Lounge

Friday, March 16

Dr. Marcos Lopez, Post-Doctoral Fellow, Department of Sociology and Anthropology

“Fragmented Resistance: Mexican Strawberry Workers and the Racial Tide that Divides Them”

An International Studies Colloquium lunchtime presentation by Marcos Lopez, post-doctoral fellow in sociology. Lunch will be provided for those who RSVP by Monday, 3/12, by emailing baldwin@middlebury.edu or by calling 802-443-5324. Sponsored by the Rohatyn Center for International Affairs.

12:15 – 1:30 p.m., Robert A. Jones '59 Conference Room

Sponsored by the Rohatyn Center for International Affairs.

Friday, March 16

Lecture by Dr. Felicia Moore Mensah, Associate Professor of Science Education and Program Coordinator, Science Education, Teachers College, Columbia University.

"Culturally Relevant Teaching via Curriculum Reform: Engaging Teachers."

12:30-1:30 p.m., MBH 220

Co-sponsored by Atwater Commons, the Department of Biology, Brainerd Commons, the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity, Office of the Dean of Curriculum, the Education Studies Program, and Office of the Director of the Sciences.

Friday, March 16

Lecture by Dr. Felicia Moore Mensah, Associate Professor of Science Education and Program Coordinator, Science Education, Teachers College, Columbia University.

Critical Race Theory in Science Teacher Education”

6:30-7:30 p.m., Kirk Alumni Center

Co-sponsored by Atwater Commons, the Department of Biology, Brainerd Commons, Office of the Dean of Curriculum, the Education Studies Program, and the Office of the Director of the Sciences.

Saturday, March 17

Dr. Felicia Moore Mensah, Associate Professor of Science Education and Program Coordinator, Science Education, Teachers College, Columbia University.

Workshop: “Culturally Relevant Teaching via Curriculum Reform:  Engaging Teachers.”

9:00-11:30 a.m., MBH 303

Co-sponsored by Atwater Commons, the Department of Biology, Brainerd Commons, Office of the Dean of Curriculum, the Education Studies Program, and Office of the Director of the Sciences.

Thursday, March 15

CCSRE Race and Ethnicity Reading Group meeting.  The group will attend the talk by Professor Jessie Daniels, "Social Justice & Cyber Racism in the Digital Era." Please see below for further details.

4:30 p.m., Axinn 229

Thursday, March 15

A Talk by Professor Jessie Daniels, Associate Professor of Urban Public Health at Hunter College and the CUNY-Graduate Center:

"Social Justice & Cyber Racism in the Digital Era"

Common assumptions about the Internet  hold that it is an inherently democratizing technology or a "place...where there is no race," as one television commercial suggested back in the 1990s. Alternatively, some see the Internet as a dangerous place where unsuspecting youth can be "recruited" into ranks of ardent racists.

In an engaging talk, Professor Jessie Daniels will challenge these and many other common assumptions about the Internet and offer new ways think about racism and civil rights in the digital era.

Jessie Daniels is Associate Professor of Urban Public Health at Hunter College and the CUNY-Graduate Center.  Her work about race, gender, sexuality and new media has appeared in the journals New Media & Society, Women’s Studies Quarterly and in the recent book, Cyber Racism (Rowman & Littlefield, 2009). She is currently at work on several research projects: one with LGBT youth of color and their use of mobile technology; another about race and feminist blogging by young women of color. Previously, Daniels also worked in the Internet industry.  Since 2007, she has maintained a scholarly blog (RacismReview) with Joe Feagin. Forbes Magazine recently named her one of “20 Inspiring Women to Follow on Twitter,” (@JessieNYC).

4:30 p.m., Axinn 229

Co-sponsored with Film and Media Culture, First Year Seminar Program, Sociology and Anthropology Department and the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity.

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Tuesday, March 13

Lecture and Screening

"Grace Lee Boggs, A Work In Progress"

Grace Lee Boggs is a Chinese American philosopher and grassroots activist who has devoted her life to social justice. Now 95 and rooted in Detroit, a symbol of worldwide economic collapse and industrial failure, she challenges a new generation of leaders to rethink what it means to be an American revolutionary.

 

 

Grace Lee, Producer/Director

American Revolutionary:  The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs is a feature-length documentary that includes biographical elements, but it is not a biopic. Grace is less a protagonist than a conduit for ideas and this is a film about the power of ideas and the process of building community. It’s also a film that will channel the elusive spirit and energy of a woman who has given herself over completely to ideas, community and revolution. The driving narrative is how one person traversed the major social movements of the last century – from labor to civil rights, to Black Power, feminism, and beyond – and emerged with a philosophy that is almost radical in its simplicity and clarity: revolution is not an act of aggression, but a series of dialectical conversations.

4:30 p.m., Axinn Center 232

Co-sponsored with The American Studies Mellon Foundation Liberal Arts Global Action Fund, the Film and Media Culture Department, and the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity

Thursday, March 8

Community Arts – A Tool for Activism

Lunchtime lecture by Dr. Marta Vega Moreno, founder of the Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute and former director of El Museo del Barrio and the Association of Hispanic Arts. She is one of the founders of the Association of Hispanic Arts and the Network of Organization of Color. Dr. Vega is president of the Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute (CCCADI), an international not for profit organization dedicated to researching, documentation and promulgating the reach history and traditions of African descendants in the Americas.

12:15 p.m., Chellis House Lunch will be provided.

 

Co-sponsored with Women of Color, MCAB, Women’s & Gender Studies Program-Chellis House, Latin American Studies Program, Office of the Dean of the College, Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity.

 

Friday, March 9

 

CCSRE Scholarship Working Group

Susan Burch will share her current work on the Hiawatha Asylum for Insane Indians.  The project is titled "'Dis-membered' Pasts: Histories of Removals, Institutions, and Community Lives."

12:15 p.m., Carr Hall Lounge

Wednesday, March 7

Film screening: When the Spirits Dance Mambo (Marta Moreno Vega & Robert Shepard, 2002, 90 mins); Q&A with Dr. Vega Moreno to follow the event.

This documentary is a real life testament of strength and triumph of the human spirit. Tracing the role of sacred African thought and practices in the formation of Cuban society, culture and music, the 90-minute documentary is a tribute to the spiritual energy that traveled from West Africa to Cuba and New York.

4:30 p.m., The Orchard (Room 103), The Franklin Environmental Center at Hillcrest

 

Co-sponsored with Women of Color, MCAB, Women’s & Gender Studies Program-Chellis House, Latin American Studies Program, Office of the Dean of the College, Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity.

Monday, March 5

"Interracial Intimacy, or The Trouble with Friendship."

Emily Bernard, Associate Professor at the University of Vermont.

4:30–6pm, Franklin Environmental Center, The Orchard (Hillcrest 103)

Tuesday, March 6

Wham Bam Islam: Documentary

Isaac Solotaroff,  presents an hour-long documentary shown recently on PBS, about a Kuwaiti comic- book artist/ entrepreneur whose idea for a series of Koran-centric comics, and its related merchandise has more or less swept not just the Arabic-speaking world but has recently been optioned in England and other European countries too, and may well come to the States.

Twilight Aud., 7:30 p.m.

Co-sponsored with Film and Media Culture, Education Studies, The Rohatyn Center for International Affairs, the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity, Department of Religion, Wonnacott Commons.

Wednesday, February 29

“The Visitor”

Juntos Policy & Advocacy presents a film screening followed by dinner and discussion.  Marcos Lopez, Middlebury College Dissertation Fellow in Sociology and Anthropology, will facilitate the discussion.

4:30 in Axinn 232 Tuesday, February 28

2012 Scott A. Margolin ’99 Lecture in Environmental Affairs

"With or Without the Science: The Case for Environmental Justice."
"Jerome Nriagu, University of Michigan's School of Public Health

The discovery, more than 30 years ago, that children in poverty-stricken urban areas suffered from lead poisoning at higher rates than children elsewhere, sparked Dr. Nriagu’s career in environmental justice. Trained as an environmental geochemist in his native Nigeria and the U.S., Nriagu has fought to address the disproportionate illness and disease suffered by poor and minority populations in rural and urban settings around the world.  He will discuss the cornerstone of the environmental justice (EJ) movement – the premise that environmental risks are higher for poor people and minorities. If correct, EJ fits into the risk assessment paradigm and should be amenable to risk-based decision making. However, there is a conflict between the EJ movement and the traditional risk science community. The presentation will attempt to explain why EJ remains a cause with or without the science.

7:00 p.m., McCullough Social Space

Co-sponsored with the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity.

For more information on Dr. Nriagu visit:

http://www.sph.umich.edu/iscr/faculty/profile.cfm?uniqname=jnriagu

Thursday, February 23

CCSRE Race and Ethnicity Reading Group meeting.  The reading is Ernest Gaines’ A Lesson Before Dying.

4:30-6pm in Carr Hall Lounge

Monday, February 20

“William Grant Still, the Dean of African American Composers.”

A brown bag lunch, panel discussion and performance of William Grant Still’s contributions to African American music.  Panelists include: Francois Clemmons, Larry Hamberlin, and Damascus Kafumbe.

Noon-1:00p.m. Carr Hall Lounge

Wednesday, February 15

The Carol Rifelj Faculty Lecture Series proudly presents Associate Professor of Geography Anne Knowles, "Geographies of the Holocausst."

4:30-6pm in The Orchard (Room 103) The Franklin Environmental Center at Hillcrest

 

WT 2012 Events

Tuesday, January 24

Talk by Professor Tara Affolter

Exploring Classroom Experiences of Students of Color at Predominantly White Liberal Arts Colleges

This interview-based study seeks to analyze the stories of students of color at predominantly white liberal arts colleges. These stories reveal that while racial diversity is often valued on such campuses, the lived experiences of students of color are not necessarily valued, included, or invited into the classroom and broader community. This study seeks ways to deconstruct a sense of "permanent visitor" status that many students of color in the study reported feeling and suggests steps that faculty can take to support all students while creating more inclusive and culturally responsive classrooms.

4:30 – 6pm, Robert A. Jones '59 Conference Room

Thursday, January 26

Sebastián Gil-Riaño, PhD Candidate, Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, University of Toronto presents, "Race in the Amazon:  the role of the human sciences in UNESCO's International Institute of the Hylean Amazon (IIHA), 1945-1950"

Many scholars see the mid-twentieth century as a watershed moment when scientists denounced scientific racism.  In doing so, they embraced the view that biological differences between human groups are minimal, and that human diversity can mostly be attributed to cultural differences.  But is it possible that this post-war anti-racist stance bore significant continuities with the racist projects it claimed to resist?  By focusing on the role of anthropologists in UNESCO's (United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural organization) initiatives in the Amazon basin from 1945 to 1950, Gil-Riaño examines some of the epistemic complexities that informed the rise of post-war anti-racism.

4:30 – 6pm, Robert A. Jones '59 Conference Room

Thursday, January 19

Join students on the CCSRE Student Advisory as they lead a student read in titled "Race, Education and Opportunity: How far have we come and how far do we need to go?" In honor of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day celebration and reflection.
4:30-6:00 p.m., Carr Hall Lounge

Monday, January 16

Race, Education, and Dr. King's Dream

Brown Bag Discussion with MLK Day keynote speaker Dr. Maisha T. Winn and Lawrence Winn, director of the Martin Luther King Sr. Resource Collaborative in Atlanta, Georgia.

12:00–1:00 p.m.  Carr Hall Lounge

Monday, January 16

Martin Luther King Day Keynote Address

Author and researcher Dr. Maisha T. Winn is an associate professor in Language, Literacy, and Culture in the Division of Educational Studies at Emory University. She has worked extensively with youth in urban schools, and in out-of-school contexts. After completing her graduate work at the University of California, Berkeley, Maisha moved to New York City where she conducted an ethnographic study of student poets and their teachers from the Power Writers collective. She is the author of an ethno-history of African American readers, writers, and speakers of the Black Arts Movement entitled Black Literate Lives: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives. Her research has been published in numerous journals. Most recently, Maisha's continued work examining youth performing literacy and more specifically the intersection of arts in the lives of incarcerated and formerly incarcerated girls has been published in Girl Time: Literacy, Justice, and the School-to-Prison Pipeline.

4:30–6 p.m., McCardell Bicentennial Hall 216

Wednesday, January 11

The Carol Rifelj Faculty Lecture Series proudly presents Erik Bleich, Professor of Political Science at Middlebury College, "The Freedom to be Racist?  How the United States and Europe Struggle to Preserve Freedom and Combat Racism."

4:30- 6:00 p.m.,  The Orchard (Room 103) The Franklin Environmental Center at Hillcrest


Fall 2011 Events

 

We also encourage you to attend the Cafecito Hour on Tuesday, December 6, at 51 Main. The program begins at 4:30pm

Through a mix of spoken word, dramatic reading, and performance, Rosita Choy spins tales about growing up immigrant and Chinese in Chicano Los Angeles. Sometimes bittersweet, often funny, her stories begin with the intensely personal and offer commentary about immigration, race, class, and sexual orientation. Before moving to Middlebury, VT, Rosita worked for 13 years as an immigrant rights and social justice activist in California, Massachusetts, and DC. Short readings to be followed by Q&A.

Monday, Nov. 28: Signature Film Series on Race, Ethnicity, and Education
Screening and discussion of The Class

Race. Ethnicity. Education. This year the CCSRE centers its signature programming on these vital and intersecting themes. Part of a monthly series, this film screening and dinner-discussions offers a rich avenue for examining race, ethnicity, and education across different time periods, geographic locations, languages, and disciplines. Please join Bob Prasch (Economics) and Laurie Essig (Sociology-Anthropology) for meaningful and critical learning about race, ethnicity, and education.

The screenings and discussions are open to the campus community. A light dinner will be available.

For more on this film visit: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1068646/

4:30-7:30pm, Axinn 232 [dinner in Axinn 229]

Co-sponsored with the Department of French, Education Studies Program, and Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Tuesday, November 29, Student Research on Race and Ethnicity: Challenges & Successes

In a brief panel presentation, students Alex Jackman, Mugo Kennedy, Sam Koplinka-Loehr, Erika Berger, Jacob Udell, and professor Tara Affolter will share their work/ research. The presentation will be followed by a roundtable discussion that addresses challenges and successes pertaining to research and work on race and ethnicity.
4:30-6pm, Franklin Environmental Center, The Orchard (Hillcrest 103)

Friday, November 18

The Indigenous Juridical System Within the Bolivian National Framework: A Case Study from the Bolivian Highlands.

Lecture by Mario Portugal Ramirez (Lecture will be in Spanish)

The lecture will address the concept of ethnicity  as it  will inquire into the cultural, historical and normative aspects of the  juridical system that combines the traditional indigenous practices and the  positive state law.  Bolivia’s present situation has  brought it into the forefront of academic investigation, as it is studied as  a sort of laboratory where the collaboration between the indigenous and  “Western” norms is tested in its new Constitution and in the peoples’  daily lives.

5:30 pm, Library  140

Wed., November 16

Brown bag lunch and discussion of Soo Ah Kwon's work on race, ethnicity, youth culture and youth activism.

Soo Ah Kwon is an interdisciplinary scholar whose research interests include youth activism and youth culture, U.S. based social movements and transnational youth activism, immigrant and urban communities, and qualitative research including ethnography, participatory action research, and oral histories. Her book Uncivil Youth: Activism, Neoliberalism, and Affirmative Governmentality is forthcoming with Duke University Press in which she examines the rise of social justice-oriented nonprofits which support youth of color activism as embedded within a logic of the neoliberal governance to enable and manage potentially “at-risk” youth of color to become "good" self-empowered democratic subjects and deploys civil society as a mode of affirmative governmentality.

Carr Hall Lounge, 12 noon-1:30 p.m.

November 16

Students from Professor Tara Affolter's First Year Seminar, "Race, Class, and Educational Inequality" will present their analysis and critique of popular films that deal with race, class and education. Students will discuss issues surrounding the representation of "urban" students and their teachers; examine the contrast between urban and suburban representation in films; challenge notion of the "white savior" teacher presented in schools and discuss multiple other issues related to common tropes often presented in these films. Popular films such as “Freedom Writers,” “Friday Night Lights,” and “The Breakfast Club” will be explored as well as lesser known films and documentaries. The event happens twice and each panel will deal with 4 different films. Refreshments will be served.

Themes addressed

November 16th: “Sports, Race, and Education” and “Race, Class, and Resistance”

Axinn 232, 4:30-6:00pm

 

Thursday, November 10

Talk by Doug Kiel, "Dreams Deferred: Competing Visions of Social Change in Progressive Era Native America”

Though traditional narratives of American Indian activism have been dominated by accounts of militancy, Native communities certainly do not constitute a homogenous monolith, and Indian Country was home to a multiplicity of cultural and political ideologies during the Progressive Era.  In the first decades of the twentieth century, a new generation of American Indian intellectuals and activists began addressing the structural problems of life under the reservation system.  Through the Society of American Indians (SAI)—the first pan-Indian political organization, founded in 1911—these “Red Progressives” envisioned the future of Native America while engaging questions of race, individuality, progress, and the tribe.

Doug Kiel studies American Indian history, federal Indian law and policy, and the history of the American West.  He is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a Dissertation Fellow in the Department of History at Middlebury College.  He is currently completing a project entitled, “Routes of Resurgence: The Wisconsin Oneidas and the Long Red Power Movement.”

4:30pm,The Orchard (Room 103), The Franklin Environmental Center at Hillcrest

Tuesday, November 15

Bayard Rustin at 100; Rediscovering a Forgotten Hero

with Film Director Bennett Singer and Walter Naegle, Bayard Rustin's partner and Executive Director of The Bayard Rustin Fund

Bayard Rustin (1912-1987) has been called "the invisible man" and "the unknown hero"of the civil rights movement. Instrumental in bringing Gandhi's protest techniques from India to America in the 1940s, Rustin mentored Martin Luther King Jr. in the workings of nonviolence and went on to organize the 1963 March on Washington, the biggest demonstration to that date in American history. Yet despite these achievements, Rustin
has been expunged from history, largely because he dared to live as an openly gay man during a fiercely homophobic era. Join Bennett Singer (co-director of Brother Outsider: the Life of Bayard Rustin) and Walter Naegle for a conversation with film clips on Rustin's life and legacy—and on the process by which Rustin is being rediscovered by a new generation of Americans committed to social and economic justice.

4:30pm, Twilight Auditorium

Co-sponsored by The Academic Enrichment Fund, Chellis House/Women’s and Gender Studies, Cook Commons, the Christian A. Johnson Economics Endeavour Fund, Department of Film and Media Culture, Department of History, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Department of Political Science, Distinguished Men of Color, Office of the Dean of the College, Peace and Justice Coalition (with special thanks to Kristina Johansson)

Tuesday, November 8


Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin

Brother Outsider: The life of Bayard Rustin captures the full extent of Rustin's complex, 60-year career as an activist. The film contains rare archival footage, including impassioned debates between Rustin and Malcolm X as well as Rustin and Stokely Carmichael. In later years, Rustin continued to champion human rights--including gay rights--in campaigns around the globe.  Watch trailer here 4:30 – 6:15pm, Twilight Auditorium

Thursday, October 27
A slam poetry workshop with Amy Sultan (co-director of film, To Be Heard), Karina Sanchez (co-star of film, To Be Heard) and students.

4:30 – 6:30pm, Gifford Gamut Room

CCSRE Race and Ethnicity Reading Group meeting

Thursday, October 27

There are three articles/essays for this session:

“How the Question We Ask Most About Race in Education Is the Very Question We Most Suppress” by Mica Pollock

“Towards a Critical Race Theory of Education” by Gloria Ladson- Billings, and William Tate

“P.C. and the Politics of Multiculturalism in Higher Education” by Evelyn Hu-Dehart

For copies of the readings please contact ccsre@middlebury.edu

4:30-6:00pm
Carr Hall Lounge

Wednesday, October 26

CCSRE Art Competition winner Jessica Appelson '12 presents her award-winning photograph taken in Delgerkhaan, Mongolia during her study abroad experience.  Light refreshments will be available.

4:30-5:30pm, Carr Hall Lounge

Wednesday, October 26
Screening and Q&A with director Amy Sultan and co-star Karina Sanchez: Power Writing: To Be Heard

To Be Heard is the story of three teens from the South Bronx whose struggle to change their lives begins when they start to write poetry. As writing and reciting become vehicles for their expressions of love, friendship, frustration, and hope, we watch these three youngsters emerge as accomplished self-aware artists, who use their creativity to alter their circumstances.

McCardell Bicentennial Hall 216, 7:30 – 11pm

Sponsored by: The Dean of the College, CCSRE, Wonnacott Commons, Atwater Commons, MCAB Speakers, FYSE 1340: Race, Class, and Educational Inequality

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Friday, November 11:The Lottery

Race. Ethnicity. Education. This year the CCSRE centers its signature programming on these vital and intersecting themes. Part of a monthly series, this film screening and dinner-discussions offers a rich avenue for examining race, ethnicity, and education across different time periods, geographic locations, languages, and disciplines. Please join us for meaningful and critical learning about race, ethnicity, and education.

For more on this film visit: http://thelotteryfilm.com/

The screenings and discussions are open to the campus community. A light dinner will be available.

4:30-7:30pm, Twilight Auditorium

Co-sponsored with the Education Studies Program

Monday, October 17: Preschool in Three Cultures Revisited: Japan, China, and the United States

Race. Ethnicity. Education. This year the CCSRE centers its signature programming on these vital and intersecting themes. Part of a monthly series, this film screening and dinner-discussions offers a rich avenue for examining race, ethnicity, and education across different time periods, geographic locations, languages, and disciplines. Please join us for meaningful and critical learning about race, ethnicity, and education.

The screenings and discussions are open to the campus community. A light dinner will be available.

For more about this film visit: http://joetobin.net/videos.html

4:30-7:30pm, Axinn 232 [dinner in Axinn 229]

The Departments of Chinese and Japanese and the Rohatyn Center for International Studies also are co-sponsoring this event.

Tues., October 4: Lunchtime talk by Vermonja Alston (York University)

Vermonja Alston, “From the Narcissism of Vision to Kinesthetic Empathy: Dancing Towards an  Embodied Cosmopolitan Aesthetic."

This presentation extends Alston’s work on Katherine Dunham in an effort to rethink cosmopolitan theory through the gendered, racialized and sexualized body in motion.

Vermonja Alston is Associate Professor in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies, Departments of English, and Equity Studies at York University, Toronto, Ontario.  She is a former dissertation fellow at Middlebury College.

12:30-1:30pm, Robert A. Jones ’59 House conference room

Co-sponsored with the Department of History, Office of the Dean of the Faculty, Environmental Studies Program, International Studies - Latin American Studies program, the Rohatyn Center for International Studies and the Women's and Gender Studies Program.

Wed., October 5: Informal talk/discussion with Vermonja Alston (York University)

Vermonja Alston, "The Past in Ruins: Disaster, Experiential Performance, and Grassroots Cosmopolitanism."

This work-in-progress approaches performance studies through literary and ethnographic methodologies in an effort to move beyond top-down theories of cosmopolitan affect.  It is based on her ongoing research on the relationship between the cultural arts and civic and transnational engagement in the wake of traumatic disaster; the research is undertaken with Ashe Cultural Arts Center in New Orleans.

12:30-1:30pm, Carr Hall Lounge

Co-sponsored with the Department of History, Office of the Dean of the Faculty, Environmental Studies program, International Studies - Latin American Studies program, the Rohatyn Center for International Studies, and the Women's and Gender Studies Program.

Wednesday, October 5: Screening of Mann v. Ford with Producer Jamie Redford who will host a Q&A session immediately following the screening.

Between 1967 and 1971, Ford’s assembly plant in Mahwah, NJ (the country’s largest auto factory when it was opened in 1955) dumped “paint sludge” and other industrial waste in the Ramapough Mountain Indians’ backyard.  Mann v. Ford follows community leaders Wayne Mann and Vivian Milligan and their legal team over the course of five years, starting in 2005, as they take on Ford and the EPA, battling to secure a healthy future for their children.For more information, visit Mann v. Ford. To add this event to your calendar, click here.

7:00 p.m., Dana Auditorium

Co-sponsored with Franklin Environmental Center at Hillcrest, Department of Film and Media Culture, Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity

Wed., September, 21: CCSRE Faculty-Staff shared reading session: Manning Marable’s  Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention.

 

Participants are invited to discuss Manning Marable’s recently published biography of Malcolm X. This event is part of CCSRE’s race and ethnicity reading group series.

Light refreshments and snacks will be provided.

4:30-6:30pm, Axinn 229

Mon., September, 19:

Open House at CCSRE
This event provides an opportunity for us to share the mission, vision, and programming of the Center with the Middlebury College community. Visitors will be invited to ask questions, offer feedback and suggestions, and get to know the place and people involved in this year’s programming.

Light refreshments and snacks will be served.

2:00-5:00pm, Carr Hall Lounge

Mon., September, 19: First Year Seminar Experience and teaching race and ethnicity

 

Colleagues in the First Year Seminar Experience program will meet over dinner to discuss innovative teaching practices that engage students in the critical study of race and ethnicity. Facilitated by Hector Vila of the CTLR and CCSRE.

 

7:30-9:30pm, Atwater Commons House [275 Weybridge Street]

 

Co-sponsored with the Center for Teaching, Research, and Learning, the Commons, and the Dean of the College

Tues., September, 20:

Open House at CCSRE
This event provides an opportunity for us to share the mission, vision, and programming of the Center with the Middlebury College community. Visitors will be invited to ask questions, offer feedback and suggestions, and get to know the place and people involved in this year’s programming.

Light refreshments and snacks will be served.

4:30-6:30pm, Carr Hall Lounge

Spring 2011 Events

Wednesday, Feb. 9: Race and Ethnicity Reading Group
This group is designed for faculty and staff who are interested in reading and discussing texts on the topics of race and ethnicity in the United States and beyond. We will focus this year on the topic of "environment." The reading group draws on materials from various disciplines and highlights new and innovative works. The group aims to gather individuals whose interests intersect on issues of difference and diversity.

4:30-5:30pm in Carr Hall Lounge.

Thursday, Feb. 17: Religion, Race, Ethnicity, and Environment

Professors Rebecca Gould (Middlebury, Dept. of Religion), Vasudha Paramasivan (Middlebury, Dept. of Religion) and Adrian Ivahkiv (UVM, The Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources) will discuss their wok at the intersections of religion, race, ethnicity, and environment.

4:30-6:00pm, Hillcrest 103 (The Orchard)

Career Conversation: Fellowships
Friday, February 25
12:30-2 pm, CSO Library-Adirondack House

Dena Simmons is a 2005 graduate of Middlebury College where she majored in Spanish and minored in Teacher Education. She is currently a doctoral student in Health Education at Columbia University-Teachers College and an adjunct instructor at Teacher U—Hunter College School of Education. Her research centers on health and educational disparities.  Her varied research interests include studying the experiences of transgender people of color in the healthcare system, the health risks associated with performing masculinity in the school setting, the relationship between environmental injustice and student learning, and the effects of educational policy on the health of our nation’s children.  Prior to her doctoral studies, Dena studied the collaboration between schools and health agencies in efforts to prevent teenage pregnancy in the Dominican Republic with a Fulbright Scholarship. She has also served as a public health consultant in Antigua, where she worked with the Directorate of Gender Affairs to provide better health services for Dominican sex workers.  Dena also served as a middle school teacher in her hometown, the Bronx, New York through Teach For America.  She is also a Harry S. Truman Scholar and a Paul and Daisy Soros Fellow.  All in all, her goal is to work toward making schools and hospitals safer, inclusive, and healthy environments for all.

Cafecito Hour: Connecting the Education of Black Males to the Health of Black Communities
Dena Simmons '05
Monday, February 28
12:15-1:30 pm, Hillcrest 103-The Orchard
Bring your own lunch. Coffee and cookies will be provided.

This talk explores the relationship between race, gender, and health with a focus on Black males, who comprise a group that is both historically marginalized and that experiences a disproportionate number of health concerns.  Specifically, it examines the role that poverty, racial discrimination, early criminalization, high-risk behavior, and a lack of access to gainful employment play in the lives of Black males.

Also bearing on the issue of Black males' health is their experiences in educational settings.  By examining academic achievement, high school graduation rates in particular, and the many ways that Black males have been failed by our public school system, this talk highlights the important yet often ignored relationship between race, gender, education, and health as well as how improving Black communities must include improving the education of Black males.

Sponsored by the Office of the Dean of the College, Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity, Education Studies, Ross Commons, Center for Education in Action, African American Alliance, and Distinguished Men of Color.

Monday, Feb. 28- Friday, March 4: Student Symposium on Communities and Justice

Monday, March 7: brown bag lunch and discussion: race and ethnicity in curricular and pedagogical development [summer workshop participants share their work and experiences]

12:15-1:30 pm, Carr Hall Lounge

Monday, March 14: Race and Ethnicity Reading Group
This group is designed for faculty and staff who are interested in reading and discussing texts on the topics of race and ethnicity in the United States and beyond. We will focus this year on the topic of "environment." The reading group draws on materials from various disciplines and highlights new and innovative works. The group aims to gather individuals whose interests intersect on issues of difference and diversity.

4:30-5:30pm in Carr Hall Lounge.

Monday, March 21: Roundtable Discussion: “Race, Space and Place”
Middlebury faculty members Will Nash, American Studies; Pete Nelson, Geography and Jennifer Hock, History of Art and Architecture will lead a roundtable discussing the intersection on race and the environment. Open to all.

4:30-6:00pm The Orchard [Hillcrest 103]

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Monday, March 21: Trans/Immigration and Prison Abolition

In this lecture, Owen Daniel-McCarter will discuss the particular legal issues faced by transgender immigrants of color in the U.S., including an analysis of how current immigration policies disproportionately bar trans people of color from gaining citizenship, and how immigrant detainment practices uphold systems of misogynist, racist, homophobic, and transphobic violence. The lecture will address why these struggles are of concern to the Prison Abolition and Transformative Justice movements, and will conclude by outlining next steps that activists can take in dismantling interlocking systems of oppression. Owen-Daniel McCarter is the founding collective member and project attorney for the Transformative Justice Law Project (TJLP) in Chicago, which provides free, holistic legal services to poor transgender people of color targeted by the legal system throughout Illinois. Learn more here http://tjlp.org/.

7:00pm The Orchard [Hillcrest 105]

Tuesday, March 22: Resisting the State: Transforming Justice

In this workshop, Owen Daniel-McCarter and Baylie Roth '9.5 will lead a discussion of how state-sponsored systems of control negatively effect and create divisions among oppressed communities, including people of color, folks with disabilities, immigrants, women, poor people, and transgender people. We will question whether current national legal battles demanding things like hate crimes legislation, marriage recognition, and decriminalization of queer sex are harmful to our communities. The workshop will conclude with collective dreaming about what lessons can be shared among activists organizing both on and off college campuses, and how we can transform justice, empower disempowered communities, and push for liberation from institutional systems of control over our bodies. Owen-Daniel McCarter is the founding collective member and project attorney for the Transformative Justice Law Project (TJLP) in Chicago, which provides free, holistic legal services to poor transgender people of color targeted by the legal system throughout Illinois. Learn more here http://tjlp.org/. Sponsored by Queer Studies House, Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity, MCAB Speakers Committee, Women's and Gender Studies Program, American Studies Department, and Chellis House-Women's Resource Center

4:30-6:00pm The Orchard [Hillcrest 103]

Thursday/Friday, March 24-25: UVM Blackboard Jungle [CCSRE is collaborating with UVM]

Thursday, April 7:  film Fresh with director [ES, AMST, CCSRE] ,

FRESH celebrates the farmers, thinkers and business people across America who are re-inventing our food system. Each has witnessed the rapid transformation of our agriculture into an industrial model, and confronted the consequences: food contamination, environmental pollution, depletion of natural resources, and morbid obesity. Forging healthier, sustainable alternatives, they offer a practical vision for a future of our food and our planet. Among several main characters, Fresh features urban farmer and activist, Will Allen, the recipient of MacArthur's 2008 Genius Award; sustainable farmer and entrepreneur, Joel Salatin, made famous by Michael Pollan's book, The Omnivore's Dilemma; and supermarket owner, David Ball, challenging our Wal-Mart dominated economy.

7:30pm, Dana Auditorium

Monday, April 11: Race and Ethnicity Reading Group

This group is designed for faculty and staff who are interested in reading and discussing texts on the topics of race and ethnicity in the United States and beyond. We will focus this year on the topic of "environment." The reading group draws on materials from various disciplines and highlights new and innovative works. The group aims to gather individuals whose interests intersect on issues of difference and diversity.

4:30-5:30pm in Carr Hall Lounge.

Fall 2010 Events

Monday, September 20

Brown bag workshop/presentation by the CCSRE annual art competition winner, Chris Murray. The Center will showcase Chris's work, which is hanging this year in Carr Hall Lounge, and the artist will discuss his work as a reflection on race, ethnicity, and environment, and the importance of art in critically examining issues of diversity.
12:15-1:15 in Carr Hall Lounge
Light beverages served. Feel free to bring lunches/brown bag.

Thursday, September 23 - Saturday, September 25, 2010

Clifford Symposium Beyond Rx: Global Health

Thursday, September 23
McCullough Social Space

1:30 p.m.: Opening Lecture, "Othering: Connecting through Differences", Susan Ray, University of Western Ontario
4:30 p.m.: Panel - Access & Investments, Linda White, Middlebury College; Jeremy Greene, Harvard Medical School; and Sarah Willen, Southern Methodist University
7:30 p.m.: Panel - Finding Meanings, Katherine Ott, Smithsonian National Museum of American History; and Richard Keller, University of Wisconsin-Madison:,

Friday, September 24

Clifford Symposium Beyond Rx: Global Health
McCullough Social Space
9:30-11 a.m.: Roundtable - Local/Global, Brian Saltzman, Dentist, Middlebury, Vermont; Maria Carmen Lemos, University of Michigan; Abul Hussam, George Mason University
12:30-2 p.m.: Communicating Health, Lisa Russell, filmmaker: "A Filmmaker's Perspective:  Utilizing Media and the Arts for Global Health Advocacy"
4 p.m.: Roundtable: Teaching at the Intersections, James Calvin Davis, Robert Cluss, Svea Closser, Sarah Stroup, and Steve Viner, all Middlebury College
5:30 p.m.:
Campus-wide Picnic
7 p.m.: Keynote: Dorothy Roberts, School of Law, Northwestern University "The New Biopolitics of Race and Health"

Saturday, September 25: Environments and Contexts

Clifford Symposium Beyond Rx: Global Health
McCardell-Bicentennial Hall
9:30 a.m-noon: Exhibit/Poster Session, Romany Redman ‘11; Divya Dethier ‘12; Juntos (Liz Scarinci ‘12, and Daniella Figueroa-Downing ‘11); Amalia Kane ‘12, and Ria Shroff ‘09; Wolayat Tabasum ‘12; GlobeMed (Hannah Judge ‘12); and Zoe Isaacs ‘13
9:30-11 a.m.: Roundtable: "Doing" Global Health Work-Different Perspectives, Chenoa Hamilton, Salisbury Natural Family Health, Vermont; Caitlin Cohen, Brown University; and Lisa Adams Dartmouth College
Noon-1:30 p.m.: Workshops: Responsible activism and engagement, Caitlin Cohen, Brown University; Lisa Adams, Global Health Initiative, Dartmouth College; and Michael Kiernan, Porter Hospital, Middlebury, and Haiti
2 p.m.: Wrap-up Session

Tuesday, September 28
Diversity in Foreign Language Teaching and Learning
Inspired by conversations last spring among Middlebury faculty, students and staff on Foreign Language Pedagogy and Heteronormativity, this informal panel discussion will address issues of inclusion in foreign language acquisition, including issues of gender, race, class and disability. Come join Kevin Moss, Armelle Crouzieres-Ingenthron, Roman Graf, William Poulin-Deltour, Natasha Chang, Hang Du, and students from the foreign languages to discuss this important topic.
4:30 p.m., Robert A. Jones '59 House Conference Room
Sponsored by the Rohatyn Center for International Affairs, Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity, Center for Teaching, Learning and Research, the Program in Women's And Gender Studies and Chellis House

Thursday, September 30, 2010
Women, Memories and War: Two Testimonies of the Peruvian Truth and Reconciliation Commission
A lecture by Rocio Silva-Santisteban, Universidad Antonio Ruiz de Montoya, Peru.
4:30 PM Robert A. Jones '59 House conference room
Sponsored by the Rohatyn Center for International Affairs, the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Women's and Gender Studies, Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity and the Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Friday, October 1, 2010
"When is racial discrimination OK?" by Paul Frymer
Paul Frymer is Associate Professor in the Department of Politics and is Acting Director of the Law and Public Affairs Program (LAPA) at Princeton University. He writes and teaches topics in American politics, institutions, and law, particularly as they intersect with issues of democratic representation, race and civil rights, and labor and employment. He is the author of Uneasy Alliances: Race and Party Competition in America (Princeton University Press, 1999) and most recently of Black and Blue: African Americans, the Labor Movement, and the Decline of the Democratic Party (Princeton University Press, 2008), which won the best book award from the Race and Ethnic Politics section of the American Political Science Association. Lunch will be available. RSVP by Monday, 9/27, by replying to this message or by calling Martha Baldwin at 802-443-5324.
12:15 p.m. Robert A. Jones '59 House conference room
Sponsored by the Rohatyn Center for International Affairs, Academic Enrichment Funds, Department of Political Science; Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity, and the Department of American Studies.

Tuesday, October 5, 2010
"Rethinking the Global War on Drugs: Criminalization, Race and the Failure of Drug Prohibition" by Ethan Nadelmann, Drug Policy Alliance
Ethan Nadelmann is the founder and executive director of Drug Policy Alliance, the leading organization in the United States promoting alternatives to the war on drugs. He is the author of Cops Across Borders, the first scholarly study of the internationalization of the U.S. criminal law enforcement, and co-author of Policing the Globe: Criminalization and Crime Control in International Relations (Oxford University Press, 2006). Described by Rolling Stone as the "point man" for drug policy reform efforts, Mr. Nadelmann is widely regarded as the most prominent proponent of drug policy reform.
Please feel free to bring your own lunch.
Sponsored by the Rohatyn Center for International Affairs, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, American Studies Program, and the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity. 12:30pm, McCardell Bicentennial Hall 220

Monday, October 11
Race and Ethnicity Reading Group
This group is designed for faculty and staff who are interested in reading and discussing texts on the topics of race and ethnicity in the United States and beyond. We will focus this year on the topic of "environment." The reading group draws on materials from various disciplines and highlights new and innovative works. The group aims to gather individuals whose interests intersect on issues of difference and diversity. We plan to meet three times a semester and once in the Winter Term.

Meetings will be held from 4:30-5:30pm in Carr Hall Lounge.
Monday, Sept. 13
Monday, Oct. 11
Monday, Nov. 8
Monday, Dec. 6

Monday, Jan. 25

To RSVP or for more information about this reading group contact Susan Burch (sburch@middlebury.edu) or CCSRE (ccsre@middelbury.edu)

Thursday, October 14, 2010
Hate, Harmony and Homo sapiens: Zones of Peace (ZoP) amidst War
A presentation in the Global Vision - Global Reach: The Middlebury - Monterey Lecture Series 2010-2011 by Pushpa Iyer, assistant professor, Graduate School of Policy and Management at Monterey Institute of International Studies.Before coming to the United States for her Ph.D. studies, Pushpa Iyer worked to secure the rights of the poor and the marginalized in Gujarat state, India through holistic development programs. Her commitment to bringing peace between the divided Hindu and Muslim communities in Gujarat laid the foundation for her subsequent work and academic interest in conflict resolution and peace building. She has consulted for different NGOs and institutions including the World Bank. Such work has taken her to India, Sri Lanka and the Philippines.
4:30 PM Robert A. Jones '59 House conference room

Thursday, November 4, 2010
Public Intimacies and Private Politics: Managing the Meanings of Transnational Korean Adoption
Eleana Kim, University of Rochester
4:30 p.m. Axinn Center 219

Friday, November 5, 2010
Eleana Kim, University of Rochester, will come to Carr Hall for a brown bag lunch talk about transnational adoption.
Please join us and feel free to bring your lunch
12:15 pm Carr Hall Lounge

Friday, November 5, 2010
Cafecito Hour: Honoring Las Tres Mariposas
Julia Alvarez '71, Writer-in-Residence
Join Julia Alvarez '71 in conversation about her experiences in writing the novel In the Time of the Butterflies and in setting up Alta Gracia, a sustainable coffee farm and literacy center addressing issues of female literacy and activism.
4:30 pm Carr Hall Lounge
RSVP to jherrera@middlebury.edu or 443-5743

Wednesday, November 10, 2010
Tara Affolter, Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Studies, will lead a brown bag lunch discussion on race, education, and environment. All are welcome. Feel free to bring your lunch.
12:30 Carr Hall Lounge

Tuesday, November 16, 2010
Reading by Eli Clare; writer, speaker, activist, teacher, poet
Stolen Land, Stolen Bodies: A White, Queer, Disabled Tracing of Identity, Native American Genocide, and Environmental Destruction.
Clare's exploration of environmental destruction, race and ethnic identity, queer community, disabled sexuality, and coalition politics, calls for social justice movements that are truly accessible for everyone.Open to the public and ASL interpreted. Copies of Clare's Exile and Pride will be available for sale after the reading.
4:30 pm Hillcrest 103

Thursday, November 18, 2010
Race, Space and Place
Middlebury faculty members Will Nash, American Studies; Pete Nelson, Geography and Jennifer Hock, History of Art and Architecture will lead a roundtable discussing the intersection on race and the environment. Open to all.
4:30 pm Robert A. Jones '59 House Conference Room

Friday, December 3, 2010
Art workshop on race, ethnicity, and environment
Chris Murray, winner of this year's art competition will lead an art workshop on race, ethnicity, and environment.
4:30 pm Carr Hall Lounge

Spring 2010 Events

Thursday, Feb. 17: Religion, Race, Ethnicity, and Environment

Professors Rebecca Gould (Middlebury, Dept. of Religion), Vasudha Paramasivan (Middlebury, Dept. of Religion) and Adrian Ivahkiv (UVM, The Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources) will discuss their wok at the intersections of religion, race, ethnicity, and environment.

 

4:30-6:00pm, Hillcrest 103 (The Orchard)

Tuesday February 16, 2010
Roundtable on Teachable Moments
“Awkward moments” around issues of race and ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic class, and other issues of diversity may arise unexpectedly in any of our classes. Participants in this roundtable will discuss such moments and explore ways we can build capacity amongst students, promoting inclusive teaching and learning experiences. Through collaboration and dialogue attendees may develop new tools to help transform frustrating “awkward moments” into positive “teachable moments.”
4:30pm-6:00pm
Location Hillcrest 103
Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Research

Thursday, February 18, 2010
Roundtable on Teaching Race, Ethnicity and Citizenship
Middlebury offers diverse courses that specifically examine race, ethnicity, and citizenship. Showcasing different disciplinary approaches, Professors Tara Affolter (Ed. Studies), Jason Mittell (Film and Media Culture), Jeremy Ward (Biology) and Hector Vila (CTLR, facilitator) will reflect on their experiences teaching these interrelated subjects.
4:30pm-6:00pm
Location Hillcrest 103
Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Research

Tuesday, February 23, 2010
Screening and discussion of the flim "The Garden",
Professors Roberto Lint Sagarena (AMST) and Kathy Morse (EST) will lead a discussion of the film “The Garden”. The film examines the fourteen-acre community garden at 41st and Alameda in South Central Los Angeles is the largest of its kind in the United States. Started as a form of healing after the devastating L.A. riots in 1992, the South Central Farmers have since created a miracle in one of the country's most blighted neighborhoods. Growing their own food. Feeding their families. Creating a community. But now, bulldozers are poised to level their 14-acre oasis.
4:30pm-6:30pm Screening, Axinn 232
6:30-8:00pm dinner and discussion, Atwater Commons
Cosponsored with Environmental Studies and Franklin House

Monday, March 1, 2010
Roundtable on Learning Race, Ethnicity and Citizenship
This roundtable builds upon the conversation of diversity in the classroom by focusing on the learning process, rather than on teaching, and invites students to lead the conversation on the ways we learn race, ethnicity, and citizenship at Middlebury.
4:30pm-6:00pm
Location Robert A. Jones '59 House Conference Room
Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Research

Tuesday, March 2, 2010
"'Out of History into Nature': Landscape, Labor and Race in Paraguay, 1900-1950'"
A lecture by Jennifer French, associate professor of Spanish and Comparative Literature, and director, Center for Environmental Studies at Williams College. She is the author of Nature, Neo-Colonialism, and the Spanish American Regional Writers, (2005), and translator of Captive Women: Memory and Oblivion in Argentina, (2001) written by Susan Rotker. Sponsored by the Rohatyn Center for International Affairs, the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, the Environmental Studies Program, Latin American Studies, and the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity.
4:30 pm
Robert A Jones '59 House Conference Room

Friday and Saturday, March 5-6,2010
Symposium: “Policing Citizenship: Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration”
The goal of this conference is an inter-disciplinary examination of how citizenship is structured by the regulation and policing of migrants in national, international, and extra-national contexts. We are especially interested in considering issues such as the "un/desirability,” and its corollary, the "il/legality" of various populations. Additional factors, such as assimilation, borderlands, community, and identity figure prominently in the dialogue we seek. Cultural, economic, and political expectations—by immigrants and others—infuse the meaning of citizenship, as it does concepts and lived experiences of migrants. But knowing these factors is not enough. Another issue we would like to examine is the existence and persistence of a gap in the understanding and meaning of migration between the migrants themselves and the host societies within which they have come to reside. Some related questions include who, exactly, chooses to migrate (or not), and why? What expectations or realities inform these decisions? Similarly, what expectations and values are reflected in common representations of migrants—in the United States and elsewhere—and what do they teach us about citizenship, policy, and migrants? Fully considering where people settle, what prospects they face, and what perceptions migrants hold, is an intrinsically interdisciplinary set of questions that requires a genuinely interdisciplinary set of approaches (geographic, disciplinary, methodological) to successfully study ethnicity, race, migration, and citizenship.
Co-Sponsored with Rohatyn Center for International Affairs, Department of Political Science, Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Wednesday, March 10
Brown bag lunch and informal discussion with Performance Artist Guillermo Gómez-Peña
Hector Vila (CTLR) and Roberto Lint Sagarena (AMST) host this informal brown bag discussion on the intersections of race, ethnicity, citizenship, and activism with performance artist and educator Guillermo Gómez-Peña.
12:15pm-1:30pm
Carr Hall Lounge
Feel free to bring your lunch
Coffee will be available

Tuesday, March 9, 2010
Cafecito Hour
Multiple Journeys
Guillermo Gómez-Peña
“Multiple Journeys: the life and work of Gómez-Peña” invokes text and historical photographs to chronicle the performance art practice of post-Mexican writer, artist and activist Guillermo Gómez-Peña. By tracing his family life as well as his past 30 years in performance, visual and literary forms, the artist will discuss his work in context to the larger evolution of the field as well as to the main political and social events of the times.
4:30 pm
CFA Dance Theater

Monday, March 8, 2010
Brown Bag Lunch on Teaching & Learning Race, Ethnicity and Citizenship
This informal brown bag discussion seeks to reflect upon and synthesize the various components in the series by inviting participants to consider diversity in the classroom from both teaching and learning perspectives. Catharine Wright (CTLR) will facilitate the discussion.
12:15pm-1:30pm
Carr Hall Lounge
Feel free to bring your lunch
Coffee will be available
Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Research

Tuesday, March 16, 2010
Roundtable on Bodies, Race, Ethnicity and Citizenship
Professors Holly Allen (AMST), Natasha Chang (Italian) and Brian Gilley (Anthropology, UVM) will critique their work on bodies, race, ethnicity, and citizenship.
4:30pm-6:00pm
Location Robert A. Jones '59 House Conference Room (*tentative location)
Co-supported by the Department of American Studies, Department of Italian, Women’s and Gender Studies, and the Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Friday, April 2, 2010
Gensler Symposium
"Deconstructing Citizenships:  Expanding Rights or Impeding Freedoms?”
Keynote Address by
Saskia Sassen, Professor; Sociology, Columbia University
7:30 PM, Bicentennial Hall Room 216

Saturday, April 3, 2010
“Interrogating Citizenship: Sex, Race, Class and Regimes of Power”
Gensler symposium: Sexuality, Race, Ethnicity and Citizenship
Co-Sponsored with Women’s and Gender Studies
9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Robert A. Jones '59 House Conference Room

Thursday April 8, 2010
The War on Terror in TV Dramas: Scripting Muslim Terrorists and a Post-Race United States
Evelyn Azeeza Alsultany, Program in American Culture, University of Michigan.
Co-sponsored by the American Studies Spiegel Family Fund
4:30 in Axinn 219

Friday April 9, 2010
"From Harems to Terrorists: Arab Stereotypes in the U.S. Media"
A Brown Bag Lunch discussion with Evelyn Azeeza Alsultany, Program in American Culture, University of Michigan.
12:15 -1:15 pm in Carr Hall
Feel free to bring your lunch
Coffee will be served

Winter 2010 Events

Sunday, January 17, 2010
Screening of documentary film 'Making Trouble': Jewish Female Comedians
Co-sponsored with Havurah: The Addison County Jewish Congregation, Women's and Gender Studies and Scott Center for Spiritual Life
5:00 p.m.
Ilsley Public Library Community Room in Middlebury
Free admission. All are invited. Discussion and Potluck supper to follow.

Monday, January 18, 2010
Brown Bag Lunch and Discussion: Religion, Race, Ethnicity, Citizenship
Rev. Bill Sinkford and professors Febe Armanios (History), Roberto Lint Sagarena(American Studies), and Mary Kay Cavazos (Religion) will facilitate a discussion on religion, race, ethnicity and citizenship.
12:15-1:30pm
Carr Hall Lounge
Feel free to bring your lunch. Coffee will be available.

Wednesday, January 20, 2010
Events commemorating the anniversary of President Obama’s inauguration:
Panel discussion on race in America since Obama’s election: Bill Hart (History), Tahirah Foy (Class of 2010), Matt Dickinson (Political Science) and Jim Ralph (History, facilitator)
4:30 pm
Robert A. Jones '59 House conference room

Keynote address Eduardo Bonilla-Silva (Duke University):
From "MIRACLE" TO "DEBACLE": The Sweet (but deadly) Enchantment of Colorblindness in Obamerica
8:00 pm
Robert A. Jones '59 House conference room

Thursday, January 21, 2010
Read in: And Equal Rights for All: Cross Racial Alliances and Activism
Facilitated by the Student Advisory Board of the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity, this read-in will draw on the history of the NAACP to consider the significant role of cross racial alliances in the campaign for civil rights. Participants will discuss what lessons can be applied to the Middlebury community.
4:30 p.m.
Chateau Grand Salon

Monday, January 25, 2010
Screening the film “Sugar” and discussion of sports, race, ethnicity, and citizenship
Professors Tim Spears (Dean, AMST) and Rachael Joo (AMST) will screen the film “Sugar” and lead a discussion on sports, race, ethnicity, and citizenship. Dinner will be provided for the first 25 people who RSVP to Janine at CCSRE@middlebury.edu.
Co-sponsored with the Department of American Studies
4:30-6:30pm screening, Axinn 232
6:30-8pm dinner and discussion, Axinn 229

Fall 2009 Events

Tuesday, September 29, 2009
Open House at CCSRE
This event provides an opportunity for us to share the mission and vision of the Center with the Middlebury College community. Visitors will be invited to ask questions, offer feedback and suggestions, and get to know the place and people involved in this year’s programming.
Light refreshments and snacks will be served.
4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Carr Hall Lounge

Wednesday, September 30, 2009
Brown Bag Lunch and Discussion on Ethnicity, Gender, and Citizenship in Eastern Europe and Beyond
Professors Kevin Moss and Nikolina Dobreva will facilitate the discussion.
Co-sponsored with International Studies Program; Women’s and Gender Studies; Chellis House;
and Rohatyn Center for International Affairs
12:15 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Carr Hall Lounge
Feel free to bring your lunch.
Coffee, tea and seltzer will be available.

Saturday, October 3, 2009
Cafecito Hour: Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity (CCSRE) Open House and Discussion
The Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity is hosting an Open House and discussion at Carr hall. This is an opportunity for us to share the mission and vision of the Center with Middlebury community members and friends. Visitors will be invited to ask questions, offer feedback and suggestions, and get to know the place and people involved in this year's programming. Light refreshments and Cafe Alta Gracia, organic fair-trade coffee from Dominican Republic roasted locally by Vermont Coffee Company, will be served.
4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Carr Hall Lounge

Friday, October 16, 2009

Free Speech or Hate Speech? The Danish Cartoon Controversy in the European Legal Context
An International Studies Colloquium presentation by Erik Bleich, associate professor of political science, Middlebury College.  Lunch will be available throughout. RESERVATIONS ARE NECESSARY. RSVP by Monday, 10/12, to Martha Baldwin by e-mailing baldwin@middlebury.edu or by calling 802-443-5324. Co-sponsored by the Rohatyn Center for International Affairs.
12:15 p.m.
Robert A. Jones '59 House conference room

Saturday, October 17, 2009
Cafecito Hour: Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity (CCSRE) Open House and Discussion
The Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity is hosting an Open House and discussion at Carr hall. This is an opportunity for us to share the mission and vision of the Center with Middlebury community members and friends. Visitors will be invited to ask questions, offer feedback and suggestions, and get to know the place and people involved in this year's programming. Light refreshments and Cafe Alta Gracia, organic fair-trade coffee from Dominican Republic roasted locally by Vermont Coffee Company, will be served.
4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Carr Hall Lounge

Monday, October 19, 2009
Nature, Race, Ethnicity, and Citizenship: Interdisciplinary  Approaches / A Conversation with Anthropologist and Geographer Jake  Kosek
In conjunction with American Studies and Environmental Studies
12:15 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Carr Hall Lounge
Feel free to bring your lunch.
Coffee, tea and seltzer will be available.

Monday, October 19, 2009
Guest Lecture: The Natures of the Beast: On Honeybees and the Biopolitics of Terror
Jake Kosek, Department of Geography, University of California, Berkeley
This talk explores the remaking of nature by tracing changes to the beehive and understandings of the bee in relation of the current fears and strategies of the war on terror. If further focuses on the rise of the honeybee as a tool and metaphor in the war on terror. At present the largest source of funding for apiary research comes not from the U.S. Department of Agriculture but from the Pentagon and the U.S. military as part of efforts to remake entomology in an age of empire. This funding is being used in three areas: first, to develop and train a new generation of bees to make them even more sensitive and to be targeted sensors of specific chemical traces, including everything from plastic explosives, to the tritium used in nuclear weapons development, to land mine detection; second, to enhance bees' detection abilities through transgenic process and even the synthesis of new traits that would better design the bee for the task of detection and monitoring of weapons development; and finally, in an explicit attempt to redesign modern battlefield technique the Pentagon has returned to the form and metaphor of the swarm to combat the unpredictability and de-centered approaches to battlefield tactics that define modern warfare. In these and other cases the bee is being enlisted in the war on terror as well as being remade in cultural and material form for military purposes.
Sponsored by American Studies and Environmental Studies
4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Axinn Center 219

Tuesday, October 20, 2009
Citizenship and National Identity--the Case of (East and West) Germany and Beyond
A roundtable discussion with Middlebury College faculty participants. This event is part of a week-long event called Freedom Without Walls cosponsored by the German Embassy to the US in Washington, DC. Also sponsored by the Department of German.
Co-sponsored by the Rohatyn Center for International Affairs, and the Department of German.
4:30 p.m.
Robert A. Jones '59 Conference Room

Friday, October 23,2009
“No Blacks Around?” Cadernos Negros and the Construction of Black Identity In Contemporary Afro-Brazilian Literature
A lecture by Emanuelle Oliveira, associate professor of Luso-Brazilian Literature, Vanderbilt University. Prof. Oliveira has done a superb work on one of the most important Afro-Brazilian literary groups in Brazil, the Quilombhoje, who are active participants of the black movement and use their writings to promode a consciousness-raising process on the questions of race relations and racism in Brazil. She is the author of Writing Identity: The Politics of Contemporary Afro-Brazilian Literature (2007).
Co-sponsored by the Rohatyn Center for International Affairs, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, International Studies, and Latin American Studies.
4:30 p.m.
Robert A. Jones '59 House conference room

Sunday, October 25, 2009
A Screening of the New Documentary "King in Chicago; a story told by people who were there. Dr. Martin Luther King and the Chicago Freedom Movement"
Followed by a discussion with Herman Jenkins, an organizer in the Chicago Freedom Movement.
7:30 p.m.
Axinn Center 232

Monday, October 26, 2009
A luncheon discussion with Herman Jenkins, an organizer in the Chicago Freedom Movement, Dr. Martin Luther King's campaign to end slums and housing discrimination, and in the Poor People's Campaign, Dr. King's last campaign.  Lunch will be served, but space is limited so please RSVP by October 23rd to Janine Podraza at jpodraza@middlebury.edu or 802 443-3198
12:15 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Carr Hall Lounge

Monday, October 26, 2009
Charles P. Scott Lecture in the Religion Department,
The Enduring Significance of the U.N. Declaration on Human Rights, with Special Attention to the Problem of the "Defamation of Religion"
David Little (Harvard University) will speak on the enduring legacy of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, with particular attention to questions of freedom of religion. In response to skepticism regarding the very existence of norms human beings can all agree to protect, Little will sketch a philosophical justification of the human rights language codified in the U.N. Declaration. He also will defend the Declaration's ideal of religious freedom, in particular against critics in predominantly religious societies who argue that it is an imposition of western culture that insufficiently protects against the "defamation of religion." Finally, Little will argue for the continued importance of the concept of "human rights," in the face of pragmatist and relativist challenges to rights language as a basis for universally recognized moral and political boundaries.
The Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity is proudly co-supporting this event
4:30 p.m.
Dana Auditorium

Thursday, October 29, 2009
Sri Lankan Muslims: Between Ethno-Nationalism and the Global Ummah
A lecture by Dennis McGilvray, Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Boulder. He is author of Crucible of Conflict: Tamil and Muslim Society on the East Coast of Sri Lanka (Duke 2008).
Co-sponsored with South Asian Studies, the Rohatyn Center for International Affairs
4:30 p.m - 6:00 p.m.
Robert A. Jones '59 House Conference Room 

Friday, 30 October, 2009
Reflections on 1989: Twenty Years of Czech-American and Transatlantic Relations
His Excellency Petr Kolar, Ambassador of the Czech Republic to the United States
Sponsored by the Rohatyn Center for International Affairs, the Department of Political Science, Russian and East European Studies, the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity, and European Studies
4:30 p.m.
Robert A. Jones ’59 House conference room

Wednesday, November 4, 2009
Professor Merle Hodge visiting professor of English at Dartmouth and senior lecturer at University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, will join us for a brown bag/discussion on race, ethnicity, and citizenship in Caribbean literature.
12:00 pm
Carr Hall Lounge
Feel free to bring your lunch.
Coffee, tea and seltzer will be available

Wednesday, November 4, 2009
"Your mother house: A View of Family in the Caribbean"
Merle Hodge, visiting professor of English at Dartmouth and senior lecturer at University of the West Indies, St. Augustine. At Dartmouth, Ms. Hodge teaches a course on women writers from the Anglophone Caribbean, relating the texts to the historical, social, and cultural realities of the region, including each writer's treatment of issues such as gender, class, ethnicity, family and identity.
4:30 p.m.
Robert A. Jones ’59 House conference room

Wednesday, November 11, 2009
"Como agua para chcolate" Screening and discussion
The film is in Spanish with English subtitles. The discussion which will follow will be in English.
7:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.
Axinn Center 109

Tuesday, November 17, 2009
Pane Discussion on the Intersection of Language, Race, Ethnicity, and Citizenship
Miguel Fernandez (Spanish and Portuguese Dept.), Tatiana Smorodinskaya (Russian Dept.)  Shawna Shapiro (CTLR) will discuss the intersections of language, race, ethnicity, and citizenship.
Facilitated by Linda White (Women's and Gender Studies/Japanese Studies)
4:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.
Robert A. Jones '59 House Conference Room 

Thursday, November 19, 2009
"Women, Alterity, and Mexican Identity in "Como agua para chocolate?" by Tina Escaja, professor of Spanish, University of Vermont.
She has published extensively on gender and contemporary literature from Latin America and Spain. She is the author of awarded poetry and fiction as well as experimental and multimedia works, including hypertext. This lecture will examine female Mexican archetypes questioned by Laura Esquivel in her popular Latin American Novel.
Sponsored by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Latin American Studies, Women and Gender Studies, the Rohatyn Center for International Affairs, and the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity.
4:30 p.m.
Robert A. Jones '59 Conference Room

Friday, November 20, 2009
Transnational American Studies, or, Why We Should Care about Korean Cinema
Christina Klein, English Department, Boston College
4:30 p.m.
Axinn Center at Starr Library 219
Co-sponsored by the American Studies Spiegel Family Fund, the Carr Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity and the Axinn Center Lecture Fund

Monday, April 18, 2011

During the summer of 2010, a group of Middlebury colleagues participated in an intensive workshop to develop courses and teaching on race and ethnicity. Roberto Lint Sagarena [AMST], Dana Yeaton [THEA], Edward Vazquez [HARC], and Caitlin Myers [ECON] will share their work and experiences from the summer and current academic year. Open to all members of the Middlebury College community.

  • Monday, April 18
  • 4:30-6:00 pm
  • Carr Hall Lounge

Light refreshments will be provided.