Middlebury

 

Jonathan Miller-Lane

Commons Head - Wonnacott
Associate Professor of Education Studies

Email: 
Phone: work802.443.3459
Office Hours: Wednesday 10:30-12 Thursday 3-4:30pm (and by appointment)
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Courses


indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

EDST 0115 - Education In the USA      

Education in the USA
What are schools for? What makes education in a democracy unique? What counts as evidence of that uniqueness? What roles do schools play in educating citizens in a democracy for a democracy? In this course, we will engage these questions while investigating education as a social, cultural, political, and economic process. We will develop new understandings of current policy disputes regarding a broad range or educational issues by examining the familiar through different ideological and disciplinary lenses. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

NOR SOC

Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2014

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EDST 0120 - Foundations of Peace Education      

Foundations of Peace Education
In this course, we will investigate the concept of a "culture of peace" as defined by the United Nations in 1998: “A set of values, attitudes, modes of behavior and ways of life that reject violence and prevent conflicts by tackling their root causes to solve problems through dialogue and negotiation among individuals, groups and nations.” Our focus questions will be: What do we know about the root causes of conflict? What knowledge and skills are required to become skilled negotiators and mediators capable of bringing about a culture of peace? What role can schools play in fostering a culture of peace given the extensive literature that argues that the current institutional structure of schools fosters apathy and fear-conditions unlikely to foster a culture of peace?

SOC

Spring 2012

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EDST 0318 - Middle/Secondary Ed Methods      

Teaching and Learning in Secondary Schools
This course emphasizes the knowledge and skills necessary for effective teaching at the secondary level. Starting from a foundation in the liberal arts, students will develop lesson and unit plans based on instructional models that reflect "best practice" and that are grounded in key concepts from their respective disciplines. Concerns regarding "classroom management" will be addressed as opportunities to design challenging and engaging curriculum. Students will be required to integrate technology into meaningful, academic inquiry. This course requires 3 hrs/week of observation in local schools. 3 hrs. lect.

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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EDST 0327 - Field Exp Secondary/Special Ed      

Field Experience in Secondary Education and Special Education
In this course we will examine secondary teaching and special education at the middle school level. Working closely with practicing middle school teachers, students will spend five days a week in the schools, observing, tutoring, directing small-group learning, developing lessons, and assessing student work. In this seminar we will explore, through selected readings and a case study, the policy and pedagogy of special education for students with learning disabilities. Further topics in middle/secondary education will be addressed. Required for students seeking a minor in secondary education. (Pass/Fail)

non-standard grade WTR

Winter 2011, Winter 2013

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EDST 0415 - Sec Student Teach Practicum      

Student Teaching in the Middle School/High School
A semester-long practicum in a local middle or high school under the direct supervision of an experienced cooperating teacher. (Corequisite: EDST 0410) (Approval required)

non-standard grade

Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Fall 2013

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EDST 0416 - Sec Student Teach Practicum      

Student Teaching in the Middle School/High School
See EDST 0415. (Approval required)

non-standard grade

Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Fall 2013

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EDST 0417 - Sec Student Teach Practicum      

Student Teaching in the Middle School/High School
See EDST 0415. (Approval required)

non-standard grade

Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Fall 2013

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EDST 0500 - Independent Project      

Independent Project
(Approval Required)

Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

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INDE 0800 - Ind Scholar Thesis      
INTD 0210 / EDST 0210 - Sophomore Seminar/Liberal Arts      

Sophomore Seminar in the Liberal Arts
This course is designed for sophomores who are interested in exploring the meaning and the purpose of a liberal arts education. To frame this investigation, we will use the question "What is the good life and how shall I live it?" Through an interdisciplinary and multicultural array of readings and films we will engage our course question through intellectual discussion, written reflection, and personal practice. There will be significant opportunities for public speaking and oral presentation, as well as regular writing assignments, including a formal poster presentation. Readings will include reflections on a liberal arts education in the U.S. (Emerson, Brann, Nussbaum, Oakeshott, Ladsen-Billings, bell hooks); on "the good life" (excerpts from Aristotle, sacred texts of different traditions); on social science analyses of contemporary life; texts on the neuroscience of happiness; as well as literary and cinematic representations of lives well-lived. CMP (J. Miller-Lane; P. Zupan)

CMP

Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014

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STLD 1006 - People's History of Middlebury      

A People's History of Middlebury College
A people’s history is a history centered on marginalized voices and on periods of struggle. In this course we will first define the meaning of the term “marginalization.” We will investigate questions such as: How have marginalized Middlebury students/faculty/staff viewed their experiences here? What has resistance looked like at Middlebury? What is the relationship between education and action on our campus? We will draw from primary and secondary historical sources including Stameshkin’s history of Middlebury College, oral histories from current and past members of the Middlebury community, and resources in the College Archives. As an interdisciplinary Education Studies course, we will use supplementary texts and multimedia resources on people’s histories, student/worker movements, the development of higher education since the early 19th century, and educational and social theory. (Approval Required; Credit/No Credit)

non-standard grade WTR

Winter 2014

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