Research Labs


Prof.  Jason Arndt (Department of Psychology)

Human Memory Lab: Our lab examines the mental processes that underlie human memory. Current projects seek to understand the nature of memory errors, the influence of emotion on memory, how taking a test (as opposed to just studying) can improve long term memory, and how social processes influence memory.

Student and Faculty Research

Neuroscience students have a variety of research opportunities available to them.

Students may choose to volunteer in faculty research labs, work as a paid research assistant, work as a summer research assistant, or enroll in independent research with a willing faculty mentor. Students enrolling in independent research before their senior year enroll in NSCI 0500. Seniors enroll in NSCI 0700, and seniors who successfully complete at least one term of NSCI 0700 may be able to pursue a final term of senior thesis research (NSCI 0701) described below.

Research Policies

Research involving animals must be approved in advance by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Review the committee's webpage to learn about procedures and find forms, or contact Professor Tom Root, Committee chair.

Research Leave Program

1. PURPOSE OF THE PROGRAM

Leaves of absence are granted to enhance the scholarly and teaching capacity of the individual faculty member and to promote the general interest of the College.

2. BASIC ASPECTS OF THE PROGRAM

Directed, Independent, and Senior Thesis Research

Directed Research (PSYC 0350)

Directed research provides opportunities for students to become familiar with and participate in ongoing research projects under the direction of a faculty member. Students gain first-hand experience in many aspects of the process of psychological research and also learn to write technical articles in psychology by preparing a paper that describes the project using APA style.

Student & Faculty Research

Students and faculty in the computer science department are very active in research. There are numerous student-faculty research projects, independent projects, and group projects. Students present their work at different research forums, both on-campus and off-campus, and there are several faculty research projects with active student participation.

Jeff Byers' Research

My research program at Middlebury is carried out entirely with the assistance of undergraduate students.  Through a variety of other internal and external funding sources, I typically have 3-4 students working side-by-side with me each summer, with a comparable number during the academic year.  Since beginning my career at Middlebury in 1986, I have been awarded one grant from The Research Corporation, two ACS/PRF grants, four NSF-RUI grants, and served as PI or co-PI on NSF instrumentation grants leading to the acquisition of an NMR, GC/MS, polarimeter, and LC/MS for use in research and co

Lessons from an octopus: student studies invertebrate learning [video]

As senior Alexa Warburton opens the door to the cephalopod lab, a pungent smell escapes into the third-floor hallway of Middlebury College’s McCardell Bicentennial Hall. “It smells like the ocean,” she comments. And it should. Warburton, a senior biology major from Hopkinton, N.H., is spending her summer studying a member of the cephalopod family, Octopus bimaculoides . Her goal is to study the way these saltwater creatures learn, thereby furthering the already-extensive body of research on invertebrate intelligence.

Three Middlebury students honored by Center for Research on Vermont

Three Middlebury College seniors have received recognition for their research projects from the Center for Research on Vermont at the University of Vermont. Elizabeth Kelley is the recipient of the 2009 Andrew E. Nuquist Award for Outstanding Student Research on a Vermont Topic. Gregory McDermott received the 2009 George B. Bryan Award for Excellence in Vermont Research. Benjamin Robins received special mention from the Nuquist Award committee. The awards were presented at the Center’s annual meeting on May 1.

Spring student symposium April 17 showcases undergraduate research

On Friday, April 17, from 1-7 p.m., more than 100 Middlebury College students will showcase the results of their recent research efforts as part of the third annual Middlebury College Spring Student Symposium. The symposium will highlight student work through a mix of lectures, performances, posters, artwork and readings. The presentations will take place in the Great Hall and various classrooms of McCardell Bicentennial Hall, located on Bicentennial Way off College Street (Route 125). All events are free and open to the public.

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