Student & Faculty Research

Students and faculty in the computer science department are very active in research. There are numerous student-faculty research projects, independent projects, and group projects. Students present their work at different research forums, both on-campus and off-campus, and there are several faculty research projects with active student participation.

Jeff Byers' Research

My research program at Middlebury is carried out entirely with the assistance of undergraduate students.  Through a variety of other internal and external funding sources, I typically have 3-4 students working side-by-side with me each summer, with a comparable number during the academic year.  Since beginning my career at Middlebury in 1986, I have been awarded one grant from The Research Corporation, two ACS/PRF grants, four NSF-RUI grants, and served as PI or co-PI on NSF instrumentation grants leading to the acquisition of an NMR, GC/MS, polarimeter, and LC/MS for use in research and co

Research Advice

Having trouble finding what you need?  Ask us for help!  Research assistance and instruction is available to groups and individuals in the College community.

For assistance in the areas of biology, chemistry, computer science, environmental studies, geology, physics and psychology, consult our Subject Guides or contact Wendy Shook, Science Data Librarian (802.443.5799, wshook@middlebury.edu). 

Lessons from an octopus: student studies invertebrate learning [video]

As senior Alexa Warburton opens the door to the cephalopod lab, a pungent smell escapes into the third-floor hallway of Middlebury College’s McCardell Bicentennial Hall. “It smells like the ocean,” she comments. And it should. Warburton, a senior biology major from Hopkinton, N.H., is spending her summer studying a member of the cephalopod family, Octopus bimaculoides . Her goal is to study the way these saltwater creatures learn, thereby furthering the already-extensive body of research on invertebrate intelligence.

Three Middlebury students honored by Center for Research on Vermont

Three Middlebury College seniors have received recognition for their research projects from the Center for Research on Vermont at the University of Vermont. Elizabeth Kelley is the recipient of the 2009 Andrew E. Nuquist Award for Outstanding Student Research on a Vermont Topic. Gregory McDermott received the 2009 George B. Bryan Award for Excellence in Vermont Research. Benjamin Robins received special mention from the Nuquist Award committee. The awards were presented at the Center’s annual meeting on May 1.

Spring student symposium April 17 showcases undergraduate research

On Friday, April 17, from 1-7 p.m., more than 100 Middlebury College students will showcase the results of their recent research efforts as part of the third annual Middlebury College Spring Student Symposium. The symposium will highlight student work through a mix of lectures, performances, posters, artwork and readings. The presentations will take place in the Great Hall and various classrooms of McCardell Bicentennial Hall, located on Bicentennial Way off College Street (Route 125). All events are free and open to the public.

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