Middlebury

 

Events

Spring Term Speaker - Kathleen Frydl

The Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity would like to invite you and your students to a talk by Kathleen Frydl, author of "The Drug Wars in America, 1940-1973," Dr. Frydl will present a lecture titled, "The Forgotten War's Forgotten Drug Use". Frydl's work details how the federal approach to drug policy changed from largely being about regulating doctors and pharmacists and raising revenue to the punitive approach we see today. Her first book, "The GI Bill,"won the 2009 Louis Brownlow book award from the National Academy of Public Administration.

Her talk is scheduled for Thursday, April 24 at 4:30 pm in Axinn 229 and is co-sponsored by the Program in American Studies and the Department of History.

Spring Term Speaker - Cybelle Fox

We hope that you and your students can join us for a talk by Dr. Cybelle Fox of the University of California Berkeley entitled 'Three Worlds of Relief Race, Immigration, and the American Welfare State from the Progressive Era to the New Deal'

Thursday March 20th
Axinn 229
4:30 – 6:00

In this talk, Cybelle Fox examines the role of race and immigration in the development of the American social welfare system by comparing how African-Americans, Mexicans, and European immigrants were treated by welfare policies during the Progressive Era and the New Deal.

Despite rampant nativism, European immigrants received generous access to social welfare programs. The communities in which they lived invested heavily in relief. Social workers protected them from snooping immigration agents, and ensured that noncitizenship and illegal status did not prevent them from receiving the assistance they needed. But that same helping hand was not extended to Mexicans and African-Americans. Instead, African Americans were relegated to racist and degrading public assistance programs, while Mexicans who asked for assistance were deported with the help of the very social workers they turned to for aid.

Drawing on a wealth of archival evidence, Fox shows how race, labor, and politics combined to create these three starkly different worlds of relief.

There will be time for Q&A following the presentation
 
Sponsored by the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity and the Program in American Studies


J-Term Special Speaker

The CCSRE welcomes Jeanne Brink to Middlebury to speak on the "Western Abenaki: History and Culture." Who were the native people of Vermont and how did they live? This lecture, examines the importance in Abenaki society of elders and children, the environment, and the continuance of lifeways and traditions.


Fall Film Series 11/5

The CCSRE hopes that you will be able to attend a screening of
Precious Knowledge on Tuesday November 5th at 4:30 in Twilight Auditorium.

This film tells the story of a community of teachers and students
attempting to save (and shape) their education. It examines the fight to save Tuscon's Mexican-American Studies program.

"While 48 percent of Mexican-American students currently drop out of hi...gh school, Tucson (Ariz.) High [School's] Mexican American Studies Program has become a national model of educational success, with 93 percent of enrolled students graduating from high school. However, Arizona lawmakers
shut the program down because they believe the students are being indoctrinated with dangerous ideology and embracing destructive ethnic chauvinism"

Following the film, Professor Tara Affolter will update the audience on the latest developments in the Tuscon case and open a broader discussion on what counts as knowledge worth teaching in schools and how race, racism, and racial identity play into those decisions. Light refreshments will be served.



Fall Film Series 11/5

The CCSRE hopes that you will be able to attend a screening of
Precious Knowledge on Tuesday November 5th at 4:30 in Twilight Auditorium.

This film tells the story of a community of teachers and students
attempting to save (and shape) their education. It examines the fight to save Tuscon's Mexican-American Studies program.

"While 48 percent of Mexican-American students currently drop out of hi...gh school, Tucson (Ariz.) High [School's] Mexican American Studies Program has become a national model of educational success, with 93 percent of enrolled students graduating from high school. However, Arizona lawmakers
shut the program down because they believe the students are being indoctrinated with dangerous ideology and embracing destructive ethnic chauvinism"

Following the film, Professor Tara Affolter will update the audience on the latest developments in the Tuscon case and open a broader discussion on what counts as knowledge worth teaching in schools and how race, racism, and racial identity play into those decisions. Light refreshments will be served.

Fall Film Series 10/4

CCSRE Invites you to Can we talk about this?, a screening of Twilight: Los Angeles 1992 and discussion with Dana Yeaton.

How A Theatre Piece About One Tragedy
Might Change Our Responses to the Next . . .

Twenty years ago, in the wake of the Rodney King Riots, theatre artist Anna Deavere Smith conducted a series of interviews that resulted in her groundbreaking solo play, Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992.

Now, in the wake of the Trayvon Martin verdict, we’ll look at clips from Smith’s virtuoso performance in which she embodies more than three dozen survivors, witnesses, national figures and LA officials.

We’ll will hit the pause-button at times to reflect: How does this relate to the Trayvon Martin case? Can art really change hearts?

Fall Film Series Saturday 9/21 and 9/23

Please join us for the screening of _The House I Live In_ a landmark documentary about race and incarceration in the United States The screening will be held twice in Dana auditorium on Saturday 9/21 at 3:00 and 8:00pm. Eugene Jarecki, the film's director, will give a talk about the film on Monday (9/23), 4:30-6 in Twilight Auditorium. These events are part of the Hirschfield Film Series and are co-sponsored with the Film and Media and Sociology and Anthropology Departments.
This film has been hailed as "fearless" and "the most important drug war film you'll ever see." We look forward to discussing it with you and Mr. Jarecki.

http://www.thehouseilivein.org/

CCSRE Reading Group 9/17

The CCSRE hopes that you will be able to attend our first reading group meeting of the year on September 17 (Tuesday) from 4:30-6pm, in Axinn 229.

We will discuss Michelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness. This will inaugurate the Center’s events for AY 2013-2014 around the theme of institutions, race, and ethnicity.