Middlebury

 

Current Year Faculty Grants

The Sponsored Research Office posts current year grant awards to the MiddPoints blog. Below is a collection of links to current year faculty grant blog posts. To view faculty grants from prior academic years, please visit the Grants and Sponsored Research office's faculty grant page here.

Recent Faculty Grants

NEH funding for Christian Keathley and Jason Mittell

MiddPoints Weekly » Faculty Grants - Thu, 09/25/2014 - 8:27am

Christian Keathley and Jason Mittell (both Film and Media Culture) have received funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support a two-week workshop at Middlebury in June 2015. Twelve participants will come to campus to explore the topic of producing video-based scholarship for the study of the moving image, with the goal of creating a special issue for the video-based journal [in]Transition that Keathley and Mittell co-edit. This grant, titled Scholarship in Sound and Image: Producing Videographic Criticism in the Digital Age, is funded through NEH’s Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities program and will be run in conjunction with the college’s Digital Liberal Arts Initiative. See http://sites.middlebury.edu/videoworkshop for more information.

Peggy Nelson awarded NSF funding for collaborative research

MiddPoints Weekly » Faculty Grants - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 8:48am

Peggy Nelson (Sociology-Anthropology) and a colleague at Wellesley College have been awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation for a two-year project titled Social and Biogenetic Factors of New Forms of Families. The goal of this project is to better understand the new kinds of relationships that are made possible when individuals have children through reproductive technologies involving “donor” eggs or sperm. Researchers will interview parents and offspring who participate in networks of connection with others who share the same donor as their children or themselves. Where possible, the researchers will also interview donors who have had contact with the parents of their offspring or the offspring themselves. At least two undergraduate students will be involved in this research.

Peter Nelson receives NSF funding for international collaboration

MiddPoints Weekly » Faculty Grants - Fri, 08/22/2014 - 9:05am

Peter Nelson (Geography) and a colleague at Point Park University have received a three-year grant from the National Science Foundation for a project titled International Rural Gentrification; research teams from the United Kingdom and France are also funded through their own respective national funding agencies. The entire project is part of the Open Research Area funding scheme for international social science research that now involves agencies in four European countries as well as the NSF. The objective of this multi-national collaborative project is to undertake the first in-depth cross-national integrated comparative study of the theory, forms, and dynamics of rural gentrification encompassing France, the UK, and the USA. The US team will compile a comprehensive database of rural gentrification indicators for each of the three countries and then identify a set of communities in the US in which to carry out in-depth case study analysis focusing on the different forms of rural gentrification and the various actors involved in the process. Scholars from the UK and France will do similar case study analyses in their respective countries. In addition to funding all the costs of the research in the US, the grant will also fund trips to Europe to meet with the entire research team; this research will be the focus of Pete’s academic leave in 2015-16. Three undergraduate students will be involved in this research.

Catherine Combelles awarded an NIH R15 research grant

MiddPoints Weekly » Faculty Grants - Fri, 08/22/2014 - 9:04am

Catherine Combelles (Biology) has been awarded an R15 research grant through the National Institutes of Health’s AREA (Academic Research Enhancement Award) program. This grant will support work to determine the effects of endocrine-disrupting compounds on the oocyte and the ovarian follicle, the structure that nurtures the developing oocyte. Because the health of adults, neonates, fetuses, and embryos all depend upon normal oocyte development, the findings will help to provide a foundation for improving not only female reproductive but also adult health. The grant funds research at Middlebury, the University of New Hampshire, and Emory University, including supplies and travel to conferences as well as Catherine’s 15-16 academic leave. At least 15 undergraduates will be involved in this research over the next three years.

Susan Burch and Tara Affolter awarded AALAC funding

MiddPoints Weekly » Faculty Grants - Fri, 08/22/2014 - 9:04am

Susan Burch (American Studies) and Tara Affolter (Education Studies), with colleagues from Barnard, Haverford, Macalester, Oberlin, Vassar, and Scripps, have been awarded funding from the AALAC consortium (Alliance for the Advancement of Liberal Arts Colleges), the successor to the  Mellon 23 program, for a collaborative workshop that will be held at Barnard in the fall of 2015. The workshop, titled Critical Disability Studies and Universal Design for Learning, will bring together participants from 10 to 13 liberal arts colleges and Columbia University who have varied levels of expertise in these related topics that are so critical to better educating disabled and nondisabled students. Participants will collaborate to pursue four related goals: curricular development, pedagogical development, faculty collaboration with disability support services, and inter-institutional development across and between colleges.

Peter Nelson – grant for international research project

MiddPoints Weekly » Faculty Grants - Wed, 08/13/2014 - 7:54am

Peter Nelson (Geography) and a colleague at Point Park University have received a three year grant from the National Science Foundation for a project titled International Rural Gentrification; research teams from the United Kingdom and France are also funded via their own respective national funding agencies.  The entire project is part of the Open Research Area funding scheme for international social science research  that now involves agencies in four European countries as well as the NSF. The objective of this multi-national collaborative project is to undertake the first in-depth cross-national integrated comparative study of the theory, forms and dynamics of rural gentrification encompassing France, UK and USA.      The US team will compile a comprehensive database of rural gentrification indicators for each of the three countries, and then identify a set of communities in the US in which to carry out in depth case study analysis focusing on the different forms of rural gentrification and the various actors involved in the process. Scholars from the UK and France will do similar case study analyses in their respective countries. In addition to funding all the costs of the research in the US, the grant will also fund trips to Europe to meet with the entire research team; this research will be the focus of Pete’s academic leave in 2015-16.   Three undergraduate students will be involved in this research.

Susan Burch and Tara Affolter – AALAC workshop funding

MiddPoints Weekly » Faculty Grants - Wed, 08/13/2014 - 7:53am

Susan Burch (American Studies) and Tara Affolter (Education Studies), with colleagues from Barnard, Haverford, Macalester, Oberlin, Vassar, and Scripps, have been awarded funding from the AALAC consortium (Alliance for the Advancement of Liberal Arts Colleges), the successor to the  Mellon 23 program, for a collaborative workshop that will be held at  Barnard  in the fall of 2015.  The workshop, titled Critical Disability Studies and Universal Design for Learning,  will bring together participants from 10-13 liberal arts colleges and Columbia University who have varied levels of expertise in these related topics that are so critical to better educating disabled and nondisabled students. Participants will collaborate to pursue four related goals:   curricular development, pedagogical development, faculty collaboration with disability support services, and inter-institutional development across and between colleges.

Leticia Arroyo Abad awarded AALAC consortium funding

MiddPoints Weekly » Faculty Grants - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 10:02am

Leticia Arroyo Abad (Economics) and colleagues from Dennison, Wellesley, Furman, and Williams have been awarded funding from the AALAC consortium (Alliance for the Advancement of Liberal Arts Colleges), the successor to the  Mellon 23 program, for a collaborative workshop that will be held at Middlebury in the spring of 2015. The workshop, titled The Economic History of Race, Class, and Gender,  will bring together participants from 10-15 institutions to explore recent advances in the economic history of race and ethnicity, gender, class, and other facets of inequality. They plan to take advantage of the interdisciplinary nature of economic history to foster dialogue about these elements of inequality with other disciplines such as anthropology, sociology, political science, philosophy, and history.

Will Pyle receives funding from Russia’s National Research University

MiddPoints Weekly » Faculty Grants - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 7:45am

Will Pyle (Economics) has received funding from Russia’s National Research University Higher School of Economics’ (HSE) International Center for the Study of Institutions and Development, which will provide support for three years. He will be participating in a research project titled Collective Action in the Business Community and giving a couple of lectures per year to students at the HSE.

Mark Spritzer awarded NIH AREA grant

MiddPoints Weekly » Faculty Grants - Wed, 05/21/2014 - 9:13am

Mark Spritzer (Biology) has been awarded an R15 research grant through the National Institutes of Health’s AREA (Academic Research Enhancement Award) program. This grant will support work to investigate the effect of testosterone replacement on the spatial working memory of hypogonadal aged male rats. It will fund research equipment, supplies, and travel to conferences and will involve at least 18 undergraduate research assistants over the next three years.