Middlebury

Study Abroad Policy

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry recognizes the value of study abroad as part of a general liberal arts education. However, study abroad can be highly disruptive to the chemistry or biochemistry major if not carried out with suitable planning, due to the significant differences in the structure of science curricula in different institutions and nations. In accordance with College procedure, courses for major credit will require both prior permission from the department chair, and the student will have to return to campus with all course materials including texts, notes syllabi, and graded work in order for the department to determine if major credit is warranted. Prior approval of a course for major credit does not guarantee it will be accepted for major credit upon the student's return.

Acceleration of the chemistry major during the first two years can lead to greater study abroad options. Freshmen hoping to study abroad as juniors, who also have advanced placement credit in chemistry can facilitate the process by enrolling in CH 107 in the fall, CH 241 in winter term (when available) and CH 242 in the spring, allowing them to get a "year ahead" in major courses.

Chemistry and Biochemistry majors wishing to study at a C.V. Starr-Middlebury School Abroad for one semester may do so in the spring of their junior year. It is not required that majors take any courses towards their major when enrolled in these programs. Recent changes in the Schools Abroad have made laboratory science courses available to Middlebury students enrolled in these programs, if they so desire.

Chemistry and Biochemistry majors wishing to study abroad in a Middlebury School Abroad for the entire junior year or junior year, fall semester may do so only if they have completed virtually all of the junior year courses by the end of their sophomore year, which can only be accomplished through a combination of advanced placement and program acceleration.  It is not required that majors take any courses towards their major when enrolled in these programs. Recent changes in the Schools Abroad have made laboratory science courses available to Middlebury students enrolled in these programs, if they so desire.

Chemistry and Biochemistry majors wishing to study abroad in English-speaking nations for one semester may do so in the spring of their junior year. At least one, and not more than three courses taken must be for major credit.  At least one major credit course taken must be in a topic not covered in the Middlebury College curriculum.

Chemistry and Biochemistry majors wishing to study abroad in English-speaking nations for the entire junior year may do so, but this is only possible through significant program acceleration and very careful planning.  This option, which would most commonly take place in the U.K., is complicated by the major differences in the structure of undergraduate education between the U.S. and U. K.  At least one, and not more than three courses taken must be for major credit. .  At least one major credit course taken must be in a topic not covered in the Middlebury College curriculum.

Chemistry and Biochemistry majors wishing to study abroad in non-English speaking nations in programs other than Middlebury Schools Abroad may do so only the most extraordinary of circumstances.

The Department currently has no formal mechanism for recommending programs or courses, as the number of majors studying abroad has historically been too low to gather any meaningful data.

While the department will do its best to help students chose appropriate courses, study abroad is a student's choice, and it is their responsibility to insure that they have the necessary courses for graduation and to prepare them for any independent study or research they might undertake when they return.

Schools Abroad / Study Abroad Program

Internship Opportunities

While we do our best to assist students interested in pursuing an internship, we cannot guarantee an internship placement. The application process is competitive, and only qualified candidates will ultimately be offered an internship.

Internship possibilities span a wide range, and vary from site to site, but generally include government agencies, non-governmental organizations, businesses, the media, educational organizations, and the arts.  Recent students have participated in internships in Spain at FUNDESO (Fundacion Desarrollo Sostenido), WWB (Women's World Banking), Hilti Española S.A., and ACNUR (Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para Refugiados). In Italy, students participated in internships in the American Consulate in Florence and the Horne Museum. In France, students have interned in the Assemblée Nationale, the Conseil Régional d'Ile de France, Maria Louisa Design, Frac I'le de France, the Robert Schuman Foundation, and Theatre et Cinema Ile de France. And in Russia students have interned at CNN, NPR, The United States-Russia Investment Fund, The MacArthur Foundation, Project Harmony, The Golden Ring newspaper, The American Chamber of Commerce in Russia, The Eurasia Foundation, The Moscow Institute of Modern Art, Yaroslavl Investment Center, as well as local schools and libraries. In any given year, however, we cannot guarantee an internship in a specific field or organization, though we will make every effort to accommodate. Please be aware that prospective internship providers normally expect candidates to have appropriate skills or background knowledge and interest in the field. In addition, students must have strong functional skills in the target language. If your language skills are not strong enough, you may not qualify for an internship.

Michael Geisler

Foreign Language Education, Nationalism and National Identity

VP for Language Schools, Schools Abroad, and Graduate Programs; Prof. of German

 
 work802.443.5275

Jeffrey Cason

Study Abroad, Latin American Politics

Dean of International Programs, Knox Professor of Inernational Studies and Politics

 
 work802.443.5745

Student uses skills learned at Museum of Art during Study Abroad

During her semester abroad in Bali, Indonesia, Abby Hoeschler introduced three elementary schools to the Visual Thinking Strategies method of viewing art that she learned through her involvement with the Museum Assistant Program (MAP) at Middlebury. Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) is a research-based innovative approach used to introduce young viewers to works of art. Curator of Education Sandi Olivo employs the VTS method, which asks (rather than tells) viewers about art, in our student-led school tours at the Middlebury Museum. In Bali, I led VTS-based tours to three different elementary schools at a small fine arts museum focused on Indonesian painting.

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