With a rich literary and intellectual tradition, the 98th annual Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference brings together emerging writers to work closely with a diverse and talented faculty. 

For ten days in August, you’ll experience the intensity—and challenge—of working under the guidance of notable writers, including MacArthur Fellows, U.S. poets laureate, and recipients of the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award.

Our rural and scenic setting amid the Green Mountains on Middlebury’s Bread Loaf campus provides an ideal environment for discussing manuscripts, sharing insights, getting to know agents and editors, and becoming acquainted with the next generation of significant writers.

Overview

Workshops are at the core of the conference. Each faculty member conducts a workshop in fiction, poetry, or nonfiction that meets for five two-hour sessions over the course of the 10 days.

  • Groups are limited to ten writers to facilitate discussion.
  • Participants meet individually with their faculty mentors.
  • Faculty offer lectures on literary writing and classes on specific aspects of the craft.
  • You can attend daily readings by the faculty, participants, and guests.
  • All participants meet with visiting editors, literary agents, and publishers.

The 2023 Session

This year’s conference will take place from Wednesday, August 16 to Saturday, August 26. Find out more about dates and fees.

In addition to their literary accomplishments, our faculty has been specifically chosen for their skill at guiding developing writers. Find out more about faculty and guests.

Financial Aid

Thanks to the generous support of Middlebury and to an endowment fund established by past Bread Loafers and other donors, financial aid is available for both published and unpublished writers. Financial need has no bearing on decisions, except as noted.

Apply

Applications are accepted between November 1 and February 15. Notification letters will be sent by email in late May. See Application Information.

What Past Participants Say:

  • “I was really blown away by the generosity of so many of the writers here. The authors and industry professionals were so willing to share their time and experience, and I was incredibly touched by how kind people were in terms of offering support and by the general positive and uplifting atmosphere that the conference fosters. I made many friends who I’m certain will be a part of my life for decades to come. This was one of the most useful things I’ve done for my writing career, and I’m deeply grateful for the opportunity  and the work you all are doing to continue to make Bread Loaf a more inclusive community.”
    Em North
    Gaston, NC

  • “My ten days on the mountain were transformative for my writing and my sense of myself as a writer. After the deep isolation of the last several years, Bread Loaf was a spiritual, intellectual, and emotional spring. What a special place. It will be with me for a long, long time, and I hope to come back again.”
    Mary Terrier
    Austin, TX
     

  • “Life-changing is an understatement. Beyond offering frameworks for feedback as well as pathways of future self-study, our workshop leader melded us into a thoughtful group and provided ideas for how to support one another. Bread Loaf surpassed my expectations many times over. As a first-timer, I felt like the atmosphere was supportive and the focus on community was strong, cultivating the next generation of good literary citizens. The way I was treated here, as part of the literary community, will reverberate at home—both by bolstering my confidence as a writer and inspiring me to give back to my local community.”
    Carly DeMento
    Encinitas, CA

  • “One of my favorite moments was early on in my workshop when someone said we are trying to be writers and our workshop instructor said, ‘No, you are writers. You aren’t trying to be writers. Don’t ever doubt that.’ And I think that sums up my Bread Loaf experience. It is incredible validation that we are writers and it was very affirming to be surrounded by people who understand the value of writing and the importance of what we are all trying to do.”
    Peter Kazon
    Provincetown, MA