Middlebury

 

Spring Student Symposium

Each Spring, Middlebury holds a Spring Student Symposium to showcase and applaud the undergraduate research and creative efforts of our student body.” This offers a wonderful setting for students to share their ideas and research with the larger College community. Here are some examples of what Classics students have recently presented:

Matthew Pincus '11
Nero’s Masks: Truth and Theater in Tacitus’ Annals

Jacqueline Montagne, ’09
Gateway of Light: The Historical and Iconographical Development of the Theotokos as Byzantium's Divine Intermediary

Carrie Bryant ’08.5
Lucan's Hell vs. Virgil's Heaven: An Investigation of the Prophecies in Bellum Civile VI and Aeneid VI

Senior Thesis (optional)

Though a senior thesis is not required, students may choose to write one. A senior thesis provides an excellent opportunity for a student to work in depth on a topic of personal interest under the guidance of a faculty member. It also forms a nice complement to the other Senior Work that our majors complete.

Recent senior theses have included:

A Commentary on Lucan, Bellum Civile VI.775-820

The Roman Law of Adoption: The Use of Private Law in the Augustan Succession

 

Collaborative Research and Research Assistantships

At times, faculty will seek student assistance for their research projects through grants from the Undergraduate Collaborative Research Fund or the Faculty Research Assistant Fund. Such work provides students with an excellent introduction into how research is conducted in the field of Classics.

Some examples:

Margaret Clark '11 worked with Professor Star on a book on Seneca and Petronius.
Jackie Montagne ‘09 worked with Professor Ganiban on Lucan and Statius.
Rebecca Scholtz '06 worked with Professor Chaplin on a book on Livy.
Carolyn Gersh '04 worked with Professor Witkin on Greek tragedy project.