Middlebury

 

Sections

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CMLT0107A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0107A-F14

CRN: 92468

The Experience of Tragedy
Please register via ENAM 0107A

The Experience of Tragedy
For over two millennia tragedy has raised ethical questions and represented conflicts between the divine and the mortal, nature and culture, household and polity, individual and society. What is tragedy? What led to its production and what impact did it have, in ancient times? Why was it reborn in Shakespeare's time? How has tragedy shaped, and been shaped by, gender, class, religion, and nationality? We will address these questions and explore how tragedy continues to influence our literary expectations and experience. Authors may include Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Thucydides, Aristotle, Seneca, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Goethe, Nietzsche, O'Neill, Beckett, Kennedy, and Kushner. 3 hrs. lect.

CMLT0150A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0150A-F14

CRN: 91571

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Please register via CLAS 0150A

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CMLT0150X-F14

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0150X-F14

CRN: 91648

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Please register via CLAS 0150X

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CMLT0150Y-F14

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0150Y-F14

CRN: 91649

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Please register via CLAS 0150Y

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CMLT0150Z-F14

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0150Z-F14

CRN: 91650

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Please register via CLAS 0150Z

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CMLT0205A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0205A-F14

CRN: 91438

Intro:Contemporary Lit. Theory
Please register via ENAM 0205A

Introduction to Contemporary Literary Theory
This course will introduce several major schools of contemporary literary theory. By reading theoretical texts in close conjunction with works of literature, we will illuminate the ways in which these theoretical stances can produce various interpretations of a given poem, novel, or play. The approaches covered will include New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Marxism and Cultural Criticism, Feminism, and Post-Structuralism. These theories will be applied to works by Shakespeare, Wordsworth, The Brontës, Conrad, Joyce, and others. The goal will be to make students critically aware of the fundamental literary, cultural, political, and moral assumptions underlying every act of interpretation they perform. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

CMLT0221A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
ARBC0221A-F14

CRN: 92510

Please register via ARBC 0221A

Modern Arabic Literature
This course is a survey of the most important moments in the development of Modern Arabic Literature from the end of 19th century to the present. We will map the developments, achievements, and innovations by Arab writers against a double background of rising nationalism, decolonization, and wars on the one hand and the idea and experiences of modernity and the west on the other. We will examine works of fiction by both male and female writers including novels, short stories, and drama, as well as poetry representing several different Arab countries. Students are encouraged to read in advance Albert Hourani's A History of the Arab People. (Open to all, no previous knowledge of Arabic is required). 3 hrs. Sem

CMLT0270A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0270A-F14

CRN: 92521

South Asian African Carib Lit.
Please register via ENAM 0270A

In Other Worlds: South Asian, African and Caribbean Fiction*
The purpose of the course is to examine a cross-section of the literature that has been marked by the experience of European colonialism and its aftermath. In addition to discussing a range of writing from South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean, we will explore the criticism and the theoretical debates that this postcolonial literature has spawned. Topics will include orientalism, colonial discourse analysis, critiques of colonialism, resistance theories, subaltern studies, nationalism, postcolonial gender studies, diaspora, and globalization. We will discuss novels by Monica Ali, Indra Sinha, Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie, Assia Djebar and others. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

CMLT0320A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
ITAL0320A-F14

CRN: 92445

Narratives Fascist Past

Narratives of the Fascist Past: Memory, Forgetting, and the Myth of the Good Italian (In English)
In this course we will examine a troublingly persistent trope in post-fascist Italian culture: the myth of the “Good Italian” or the belief that Italians, benevolent by nature, overwhelmingly opposed the ideals of the fascist regime, protected Jews from deportation, and regularly subverted fascist law. Students will read several key literary texts—Gadda’s That Awful Mess on the Via Merulana, Loy’s First Words, Eco’s The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana, and Lucarelli’s Carte Blanche—alongside academic historiography, popular histories, journalism, and testimonies in order to fully grasp what is at stake in the heated public and scholarly debate over the “Good Italian”. We will consider issues such as the possibility of knowing history through literature, the ethical implications that arise from that possibility, and the narrative mechanisms through which the literary text engages or fails to engage questions of individual and collective accountability. (ENAM 0103 or CMLT 0101 or permission of the instructor) 3 hrs. sem.

CMLT0371A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
SPAN0371A-F14 SPAN0371B-F14 CMLT0371B-F14

CRN: 92484

Don Quixote/Visual Culture
Please register via SPAN 0371A

Don Quixote/ and Its Representation in Visual Culture*
In this course we will read Cervantes’ masterpiece, Don Quixote. Special attention will be given to the historical, philosophical, and cultural context of the period. Emphasis will be placed on specific topics such as religion, governance, intercultural relationships, madness, parody, authorship, and love. We will also study the novel’s representation and adaption in a selection of illustrations, graphic novels, animated films, comics, children’s books, and music. Representation in contemporary global cinema, television, and advertising will also be examined. Students will study different adaptations from Europe, Latin America, Asia, and the United States. (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver). 3 hrs. lect../screening.

CMLT0371B-F14

Cross-Listed As:
SPAN0371A-F14 CMLT0371A-F14 SPAN0371B-F14

CRN: 92669

Don Quixote/Visual Culture
Please register via SPAN 0371B

Don Quixote/ and Its Representation in Visual Culture*
In this course we will read Cervantes’ masterpiece, Don Quixote. Special attention will be given to the historical, philosophical, and cultural context of the period. Emphasis will be placed on specific topics such as religion, governance, intercultural relationships, madness, parody, authorship, and love. We will also study the novel’s representation and adaption in a selection of illustrations, graphic novels, animated films, comics, children’s books, and music. Representation in contemporary global cinema, television, and advertising will also be examined. Students will study different adaptations from Europe, Latin America, Asia, and the United States. (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver). 3 hrs. lect../screening.

CMLT0450A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0450A-F14 CLAS0701A-F14

CRN: 91570

History of Clas Lit
Please register via CLAS 0450A

History of Classical Literature
A comprehensive overview of the major literary, historical, and philosophical works of Greece and Rome. Greek authors studied include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Roman authors include Lucretius, Cicero, Livy, Vergil, Petronius, and Tacitus. Required of senior majors in Classics/Classical Studies (see CLAS 0701) and open to all interested students with some background in Greek and Roman literature, history, or philosophy. 3 hrs. lect.

CMLT0500A-F14

CRN: 91397

Independent Study

Independent Study
Approval Required

CMLT0500B-F14

CRN: 91398

Independent Study

Independent Study
Approval Required

CMLT0500C-F14

CRN: 91780

Independent Study

Independent Study
Approval Required

CMLT0700A-F14

CRN: 92094

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
Approval required.

CMLT0700B-F14

CRN: 92095

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
Approval required.

CMLT0700C-F14

CRN: 92155

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
Approval required.