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CMLT0107A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0107A-F16

CRN: 92335

The Experience of Tragedy
Please register via ENAM 0107A
The Experience of Tragedy
For over two millennia tragedy has raised ethical questions and represented conflicts between the divine and the mortal, nature and culture, household and polity, individual and society. What is tragedy? What led to its production and what impact did it have, in ancient times? Why was it reborn in Shakespeare's time? How has tragedy shaped, and been shaped by, gender, class, religion, and nationality? We will address these questions and explore how tragedy continues to influence our literary expectations and experience. Authors may include Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Thucydides, Aristotle, Seneca, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Goethe, Nietzsche, O'Neill, Beckett, Kennedy, and Kushner. 3 hrs. lect.

CMLT0150A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0150A-F16 CLAS0150B-F16 CMLT0150B-F16

CRN: 91310

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Please register via CLAS 0150A
Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CMLT0150B-F16

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0150A-F16 CMLT0150A-F16 CLAS0150B-F16

CRN: 92133

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Please register via CLAS 0150B
Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CMLT0150Z-F16

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0150Z-F16

CRN: 91370

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Please register via CLAS 0150Z
Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CMLT0201A-F16

CRN: 92391

Science Fiction Global Context
The Fictions of Science and Science Fiction: Technological Fantasies in Global Context
In The Human Condition, Hannah Arendt refers to science fiction as “a vehicle for mass sentiments and mass desires” that bears witness to the fact that “science has realized and affirmed what men anticipated in dreams that were neither wild nor idle.” Drawing on a wide range of literary, cinematic, and philosophical texts from Europe, Russia, Asia, Africa, and Latin America, in this course we will examine how cultural specificity informs and responds to the demands of technological fantasy, and investigate the challenges and opportunities posed to the concept of “the human” in an age dominated by technology. 3 hrs. lect.

CMLT0205A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0205A-F16

CRN: 91230

Intro:Contemporary Lit. Theory
Please register via ENAM 0205A
Introduction to Contemporary Literary Theory
This course will introduce several major schools of contemporary literary theory. By reading theoretical texts in close conjunction with works of literature, we will illuminate the ways in which these theoretical stances can produce various interpretations of a given poem, novel, or play. The approaches covered will include New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Marxism and Cultural Criticism, Feminism, and Post-Structuralism. These theories will be applied to works by Shakespeare, Wordsworth, The Brontës, Conrad, Joyce, and others. The goal will be to make students critically aware of the fundamental literary, cultural, political, and moral assumptions underlying every act of interpretation they perform. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

CMLT0210A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
ARBC0210A-F16

CRN: 92510

Arabia: A Literary Approach
Please register via ARBC 0210
Arabia: A Literary Approach (in English)
In this course we will examine the Arabian Peninsula as a literary topos that has beguiled representation in both Eastern and Western literature. Whether it is depicted as a glittering spectacle of petro-dollars, the haunt of Bedouin tribesmen or as a sacred focal point, Arabia is an open canvas on which successive societies have sketched their anxieties and aspirations Simultaneously, Arabia has its own rich legacy of self-representation that has been shaped by its harsh environment and unique resources. We will sift through these representations in texts that range among pre-Islamic poetry, the accounts of foreign explorers, novels by modern Arab authors, and contemporary Bedouin oral poetry. All readings will be in English and no previous knowledge of Arabic is required. 3 hrs. sem.

CMLT0237A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
HEBM0237A-F16 HEBM0237B-F16 CMLT0237B-F16

CRN: 92532

Israel-Palestine Conflict
Please register via HEBM 0237A
The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict in Literature and Film
The Israeli-Palestinian conflict has been the subject of diverse cultural productions from the beginning of the 20th century to the present day. In this course we will look at the representation of the conflict in Palestinian and Israeli literature and film, exploring the ways in which images, metaphors, and narratives shape and reflect political realities. The course will include the historical evolution of the conflict, and will introduce students to theoretical concepts of use in analyzing political issues through a cultural lens. We will also examine the intersections of the geo-political conflict with gender, sexuality, ethnicity and religion as represented in cinematic and literary works. Class materials will include the films, Hill 24 Doesn’t Answer, The Time that Remains, The Lemon Tree, The Bubble, and Avenge but One of My Two Eyes, as well as works of poetry and prose by authors, Hayim Guri, Natan Aleterman, Dalia Rabikovitch, Amos Oz, Mahmood Darwish, Adania Shibli, Sayed Kashua, and Others.

CMLT0237B-F16

Cross-Listed As:
HEBM0237A-F16 HEBM0237B-F16 CMLT0237A-F16

CRN: 92533

Israel-Palestine Conflict
Please register via HEBM 0237B
The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict in Literature and Film
The Israeli-Palestinian conflict has been the subject of diverse cultural productions from the beginning of the 20th century to the present day. In this course we will look at the representation of the conflict in Palestinian and Israeli literature and film, exploring the ways in which images, metaphors, and narratives shape and reflect political realities. The course will include the historical evolution of the conflict, and will introduce students to theoretical concepts of use in analyzing political issues through a cultural lens. We will also examine the intersections of the geo-political conflict with gender, sexuality, ethnicity and religion as represented in cinematic and literary works. Class materials will include the films, Hill 24 Doesn’t Answer, The Time that Remains, The Lemon Tree, The Bubble, and Avenge but One of My Two Eyes, as well as works of poetry and prose by authors, Hayim Guri, Natan Aleterman, Dalia Rabikovitch, Amos Oz, Mahmood Darwish, Adania Shibli, Sayed Kashua, and Others.

CMLT0238A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0238A-F16

CRN: 92261

Literature Mystical Experience
Please register via RELI 0238A
Literature and the Mystical Experience
In this course we will explore how narrative art articulates spiritual perception by examining selected works of 20th century writers such as Miguel De Unamuno, Nikos Kazantzakis, J. D. Salinger, Charles Williams, Flannery O'Connor, Thomas Merton, Alice Munroe, Marilynne Robinson, and Annie Dillard. Drawing on theology and philosophy as an interpretative mode, we will consider the following questions: How does literature illuminate selfhood and interiority? How do contemplation and ascetic practice guide the self to divine knowledge and cosmic unification? How do language, imagery and symbols shape the unitive experience as a tool for empathy and understanding of the other? 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

CMLT0286A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
PHIL0286A-F16

CRN: 91999

Philosophy & Literature
Please Register via PHIL 0286A
Philosophy & Literature
In this course we will explore the border both separating and joining philosophy and literature. How does literature evoke philosophical problems, and how do philosophers interpret such works? How does fiction create meaning? Beginning with Greek tragedy, we investigate Plato’s “quarrel” with, and Aristotle’s defense of, poetry. Then we will turn to modern works, mostly European, on topics such as: tragedy and ethics; style and rhetoric; author and reader; time and temporality; mood and emotion; existence and mortality. Literary readings after Sophocles will be selected from Borges, Calvino, Camus, Kafka, Tolstoy, and Woolf. Philosophical readings after Plato and Aristotle will be selected from Bergson, Danto, Freud, Murdoch, Ricoeur, and Nussbaum. Not open to students who have taken PHIL/CMLT 1014.

CMLT0304A-F16

CRN: 92392

Lit, Nature, Manmade
Literature, Nature, and the Manmade
In this course we will explore the relationship between literature, nature, and the manmade. Modern and contemporary writers have had a difficult relationship with nature and the natural world because, since Enlightenment, technology, architecture, and economy have made and mediated that world decisively. And yet, authors have flirted with the idea of nature, unsullied or not, as entangled with the literary form. We will also explore those entanglements in the works of Western and non-Western authors such as Joseph Conrad, Franz Kafka, Premchand, Manik Bandopadhyay, Laszlo Krasznahorkai, Mongo Beti, Phaswane Mpe, and others. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0317A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0317A-F16

CRN: 92269

Lost & Found in Translation
Lost & Found in Translation
In this course we will explore the fundamental philosophical, sociological, and linguistic questions raised by translingual communication through a survey of the greatest theoretical writings on translation together with a comparative study of multiple translations of coherent sections from major works such as the Bible, the Iliad, One Thousand and One Nights, and the Tao Te Ching, as well as other shorter texts. Questions to be considered include: How much does language determine how we think? How much of language is culture? What is unique to translating sacred texts, poetry, “exotic” languages, and dead languages? How do we define the “untranslatable”? Are translators traitors, drudges, or artists? Can machines translate? 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0375A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
PGSE0375A-F16

CRN: 92209

Colonial Discourse/Lusophone
Please register via PGSE 0375A
Colonial Discourse and the “Lusophone World”
In this course we will analyze how European colonialism and imperial endeavors produced meaning, particularly in the interconnected realms of culture, race, language, gender, sexuality, and place. In addition to studying the colonial period, we will pay particular attention to the role and manifestations of colonial discourse more contemporarily in the contexts of nationhood, globalization, sports, and cultural consumption. In doing so, we will address the problematics of the concept of “Lusophone,” starting with the historical legacies and cultural implications of such a transnational entity. Course materials will include critical theory, literary texts, primary historical sources, visual media, and music from Brazil, Lusophone Africa, Lusophone Asia, and Portugal. (PGSE 0215 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0450A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0450A-F16 CLAS0701A-F16

CRN: 91309

History of Clas Lit
Please register via CLAS 0450A
History of Classical Literature
A comprehensive overview of the major literary, historical, and philosophical works of Greece and Rome. Greek authors studied include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Roman authors include Lucretius, Cicero, Livy, Vergil, Petronius, and Tacitus. Required of senior majors in Classics/Classical Studies (see CLAS 0701) and open to all interested students with some background in Greek and Roman literature, history, or philosophy. 3 hrs. lect.

CMLT0500A-F16

CRN: 91192

Independent Study
Independent Study
Approval Required

CMLT0500E-F16

CRN: 92129

Independent Study
Independent Study
Approval Required

CMLT0700A-F16

CRN: 91557

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
Approval required.

CMLT0700D-F16

CRN: 92131

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
Approval required.

CMLT0700E-F16

CRN: 92149

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
Approval required.

Comparative Literature Program

Axinn Center at Starr Library
15 Old Chapel Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753