Sections

« Winter 2017 Spring 2017

CMLT0101A-S17

CRN: 21156

Intro to World Literature
Introduction to World Literature
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0101B-S17

CRN: 21157

Intro to World Literature
Introduction to World Literature
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0101Z-S17

CRN: 21158

Intro to World Literature
Discussion
Introduction to World Literature
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0205A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0205A-S17

CRN: 21291

Intro:Contemporary Lit. Theory
Please register via ENAM 0205A
Introduction to Contemporary Literary Theory
This course will introduce several major schools of contemporary literary theory. By reading theoretical texts in close conjunction with works of literature, we will illuminate the ways in which these theoretical stances can produce various interpretations of a given poem, novel, or play. The approaches covered will include New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Marxism and Cultural Criticism, Feminism, and Post-Structuralism. These theories will be applied to works by Shakespeare, Wordsworth, The Brontës, Conrad, Joyce, and others. The goal will be to make students critically aware of the fundamental literary, cultural, political, and moral assumptions underlying every act of interpretation they perform. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

CMLT0277A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0277A-S17

CRN: 22430

The Arabian Nights
Please register via RELI 0277A
The Arabian Nights—Storytelling, Orientalism, and Islamic Culture
In this course we will study the great medieval classic The Arabian Nights or The Thousand and One Nights Entertainment. Compiled in Egypt and Syria in the 14th century and translated into French and other European languages in the 17th and 18th centuries, this “ocean story” has had a profound effect on the development of the literatures of both the Middle East and the West. The incorporation of ‘Arabian Nights’ motifs in European art and orientalist discourse will be central in our enquiry. This course is not open to students who have taken RELI/CMLT 1038.

CMLT0299A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
ITAL0299A-S17

CRN: 22256

Literary Feasts
Please register via ITAL 0299A
Literary Feasts: Representations of Food in Modern Narrative (in English)
This course will consider food and eating practices within specific cultural and historical contexts. We will analyze realistic, symbolic, religious, erotic, and political functions surrounding the preparation and consumption of food. Readings will be drawn from several national traditions, with a focus on Europe. Authors will include, among others, I. Dinesen, L. Esquivel, J. Harris, E. Hemingway, T. Lampedusa, P. Levi, C. Petrini, M. Pollan, E. Vittorini, and B. Yoshimoto. Viewing of several films where food and eating play an important role will supplement class discussion.

CMLT0325A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0325A-S17

CRN: 22301

Chinese Poetry in the Far West
Please register via ENAM 0325A
Chinese Poetry in the Far West
Although Tang poetry is recognized as one of the great achievements of world literature, much of its beauty is often lost in translation. In this course—intended for students with no knowledge of Chinese—we will thus devote a significant portion of our time learning from scratch how to read Tang poetry in the original by studying the most common characters and the most fundamental grammatical structures found in the Tang “sonnet.” We will also discuss such topics as: differences between Chinese and European poetics; theories of translation and intercultural adaptation; Orientalist fantasies of the ideogram; and the impact of Chinese poetry on Imagism. Students will study and write multiple translations in various styles. Readings will include both poetry and critical theory. No knowledge of Chinese is necessary. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0500A-S17

CRN: 21162

Independent Study
Independent Study
Approval Required

CMLT0700A-S17

CRN: 21437

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
Approval required.

CMLT0700D-S17

CRN: 21509

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
Approval required.

CMLT0700G-S17

CRN: 22103

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
Approval required.

CMLT0700H-S17

CRN: 21818

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
Approval required.

Comparative Literature Program

Axinn Center at Starr Library
15 Old Chapel Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753