Sections

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CMLT0101A-S16

CRN: 21191

Intro to World Literature
Introduction to World Literature
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0101B-S16

CRN: 21192

Intro to World Literature
Introduction to World Literature
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0101C-S16

CRN: 22135

Intro to World Literature
Introduction to World Literature
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0101Z-S16

CRN: 21193

Intro to World Literature
Discussion
Introduction to World Literature
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMLT0205A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0205A-S16

CRN: 21336

Intro:Contemporary Lit. Theory
Please register via ENAM 0205A
Introduction to Contemporary Literary Theory
This course will introduce several major schools of contemporary literary theory. By reading theoretical texts in close conjunction with works of literature, we will illuminate the ways in which these theoretical stances can produce various interpretations of a given poem, novel, or play. The approaches covered will include New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Marxism and Cultural Criticism, Feminism, and Post-Structuralism. These theories will be applied to works by Shakespeare, Wordsworth, The Brontës, Conrad, Joyce, and others. The goal will be to make students critically aware of the fundamental literary, cultural, political, and moral assumptions underlying every act of interpretation they perform. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

CMLT0285A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0285A-S16

CRN: 22156

Magical Realism(s)
Please register via ENAM 0285A
Magical Realism(s)
Novels that juxtapose the marvelous with the everyday have shadowed (and mocked) mainstream realism for the better part of two centuries, and have proliferated in recent years to the point where they may constitute the predominant genre of our globalized culture. Why should such strange mélanges of the quotidian and the supernatural strike so many authors as the perfect vehicle to express 20th and 21st century anxieties and possibilities? We will explore examples of these boundary-defying fictions across several decades and various national literatures. Authors to be studied will include Woolf, Kafka, Calvino, Morrison, Pynchon, Rushdie, and Garcia-Marquez.

CMLT0302A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0302A-S16

CRN: 22520

Cinema in a Globalizing World
Cinema in a Globalizing World
In this course we will study cinema as everyday narrative deepening our relationship with a globalizing world. We will study closely how pauperized, sexualized, hyper-urbanized, conflicted, and violent globalizing worlds demand specific techniques of cinematic storytelling that often cut across the genres of auteur, fantasy/sci-fi, kitsch, gangster, political, drama, and indie. With this knowledge of the blurring of aesthetics and categories, we will watch Ritwik
Ghatak’s Jukti, Takko, ar Gappo (Reason, Argument, and a Story, India), Wong-Kar-Wai’s Chungking Express (Hong Kong), Tranh Anh Hung’s Cyclo (Vietnam), Tareque Masud’s Matir Moyna (The Clay Bird, Bangladesh), Neill Blomkamp’s District 9 (South Africa), Bela Tarr’s Sátántangó (Hungary), Pedro Costa’s Colossal Youth (Portugal), and Kim Longinotto’s Salma (Britain). Students will come to understand cinematic techniques in the context of politics of filmmaking and film criticism today. We will read selections from critical film theory, postcolonial film criticism, psychoanalysis, and new media. Reading list includes Laura Marks, Jacques Ranciere, Trinh Minh-ha, Gayatri Spivak, Ritwik Ghatak, Satyajit Ray, Ravi Vasudevan, Kaja Silverman, Christian Keathley, Ulka Anjaria, and others.

CMLT0307A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0307A-S16

CRN: 22325

Truth and Other Fictions
Please register via ENAM 0307A
Pulling Reality’s Hair: Truth and Other Fictions
In this course we will occupy ourselves with works that straddle, blur, or occasionally just flat out ignore the aesthetic divide between fiction and non-fiction, in the hopes of getting a better grip on the relation between self and other, word and world, narrative strategy and fidelity to truths both large and small. Hence readings will include biographical and autobiographical novels, novelistic treatments of biography and autobiography, and a number of hybrid composites that cannot be classified, though we will surely try. Readings will include Nabokov, Proust, Henry Adams, J.M. Coetzee, W.G. Sebald, Lydia Davis, Joan Didion, Gregoire Bouillier, Art Spiegelman, and Spalding Gray. In addition we will view films by Ross McElwee, Andre Gregory, and Charlie Kaufman. (Not open to students who have taken ENAM 0417) 3 hrs. sem.

CMLT0310A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
GRMN0310A-S16

CRN: 22247

Holocaust in Literature
Please register via GRMN 0310A
Representing the Unthinkable: The Holocaust in Literature (in English)
Can the Holocaust be described in words? Can images represent the horrors of Auschwitz? In this seminar we will explore the literary and artistic representations of the Shoah, their mechanisms, tensions, and challenges. We will approach the issues of Holocaust representations by considering a significant array of texts that span genres, national literatures, time, narrative and poetic styles, and historical situations. Readings will include theoretical texts on witnessing, memory, post-memory, and trauma by authors such as Sherman Alexie, Jean Amery, Hannah Arendt, Ilan Avisar, Tadeusz Borowski, Paul Celan, Chaim Kaplan, Ruth Kluger, Primo Levi, Bernhard Schlink, Art Spiegelman, Peter Weiss, and Eli Wiesel. 3 hrs. sem.

CMLT0500A-S16

CRN: 21197

Independent Study
Independent Study
Approval Required

CMLT0700A-S16

CRN: 21514

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
Approval required.

CMLT0700C-S16

CRN: 21601

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
Approval required.

CMLT0700D-S16

CRN: 21603

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
Approval required.

CMLT0700E-S16

CRN: 22065

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
Approval required.

CMLT0700F-S16

CRN: 22068

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
Approval required.

CMLT0700G-S16

CRN: 22558

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
Approval required.

Comparative Literature Program

Axinn Center at Starr Library
15 Old Chapel Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753