Middlebury

 

Sections

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ECON0150A-S12

CRN: 20295

Intro Macroeconomics

Introductory Macroeconomics
An introduction to macroeconomics: a consideration of macroeconomic problems such as unemployment and inflation. Theories and policy proposals of Keynesian and classical economists are contrasted. Topics considered include: banking, financial institutions, monetary policy, taxation, government spending, fiscal policy, tradeoffs between inflation and unemployment in both the short run and the long run, and wage-price spirals. 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0150B-S12

CRN: 20296

Intro Macroeconomics

Introductory Macroeconomics
An introduction to macroeconomics: a consideration of macroeconomic problems such as unemployment and inflation. Theories and policy proposals of Keynesian and classical economists are contrasted. Topics considered include: banking, financial institutions, monetary policy, taxation, government spending, fiscal policy, tradeoffs between inflation and unemployment in both the short run and the long run, and wage-price spirals. 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0150C-S12

CRN: 20298

Intro Macroeconomics

Introductory Macroeconomics
An introduction to macroeconomics: a consideration of macroeconomic problems such as unemployment and inflation. Theories and policy proposals of Keynesian and classical economists are contrasted. Topics considered include: banking, financial institutions, monetary policy, taxation, government spending, fiscal policy, tradeoffs between inflation and unemployment in both the short run and the long run, and wage-price spirals. 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0150D-S12

CRN: 20301

Intro Macroeconomics

Introductory Macroeconomics
An introduction to macroeconomics: a consideration of macroeconomic problems such as unemployment and inflation. Theories and policy proposals of Keynesian and classical economists are contrasted. Topics considered include: banking, financial institutions, monetary policy, taxation, government spending, fiscal policy, tradeoffs between inflation and unemployment in both the short run and the long run, and wage-price spirals. 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0155A-S12

CRN: 20305

Intro Microeconomics

Introductory Microeconomics
An introduction to the analysis of such microeconomic problems as price formation (the forces behind demand and supply), market structures from competitive to oligopolistic, distribution of income, and public policy options bearing on these problems. 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0155B-S12

CRN: 20304

Intro Microeconomics

Introductory Microeconomics
An introduction to the analysis of such microeconomic problems as price formation (the forces behind demand and supply), market structures from competitive to oligopolistic, distribution of income, and public policy options bearing on these problems. 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0155C-S12

CRN: 20306

Intro Microeconomics

Introductory Microeconomics
An introduction to the analysis of such microeconomic problems as price formation (the forces behind demand and supply), market structures from competitive to oligopolistic, distribution of income, and public policy options bearing on these problems. 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0155D-S12

CRN: 20307

Intro Microeconomics

Introductory Microeconomics
An introduction to the analysis of such microeconomic problems as price formation (the forces behind demand and supply), market structures from competitive to oligopolistic, distribution of income, and public policy options bearing on these problems. 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0155E-S12

CRN: 21143

Intro Microeconomics

Introductory Microeconomics
An introduction to the analysis of such microeconomic problems as price formation (the forces behind demand and supply), market structures from competitive to oligopolistic, distribution of income, and public policy options bearing on these problems. 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0205A-S12

CRN: 22232

Economics of Investing

Economics of Investing
This course explores introductory issues in the pricing of financial instruments and the organization of financial markets. This includes developing methods to price stocks and bonds, evaluate portfolios and understand financial derivatives, and applying these methods to actual financial data in an accessible and non-technical manner. This course does not count as an elective toward the economics major, but will count towards the economics minor. Students who have taken ECON 0316 or ECON 0317 are not allowed to register for ECON 0205. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0210A-S12

CRN: 20308

Economic Statistics

Economic Statistics
Basic methods and concepts of statistical inference with an emphasis on economic applications. Topics include probability distributions, random variables, simple linear regression, estimation, hypothesis testing, and contingency table analysis. A weekly one-hour lab is part of this course in addition to three hours of class meetings per week. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) Credit is not given for ECON 0210 if the student has taken MATH 0116, MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0210B-S12

CRN: 21472

Economic Statistics

Economic Statistics
Basic methods and concepts of statistical inference with an emphasis on economic applications. Topics include probability distributions, random variables, simple linear regression, estimation, hypothesis testing, and contingency table analysis. A weekly one-hour lab is part of this course in addition to three hours of class meetings per week. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) Credit is not given for ECON 0210 if the student has taken MATH 0116, MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0210W-S12

CRN: 21473

Economic Statistics
Lab

Economic Statistics
Basic methods and concepts of statistical inference with an emphasis on economic applications. Topics include probability distributions, random variables, simple linear regression, estimation, hypothesis testing, and contingency table analysis. A weekly one-hour lab is part of this course in addition to three hours of class meetings per week. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) Credit is not given for ECON 0210 if the student has taken MATH 0116, MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0210X-S12

CRN: 21474

Economic Statistics
Lab

Economic Statistics
Basic methods and concepts of statistical inference with an emphasis on economic applications. Topics include probability distributions, random variables, simple linear regression, estimation, hypothesis testing, and contingency table analysis. A weekly one-hour lab is part of this course in addition to three hours of class meetings per week. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) Credit is not given for ECON 0210 if the student has taken MATH 0116, MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0210Y-S12

CRN: 20309

Economic Statistics
Lab

Economic Statistics
Basic methods and concepts of statistical inference with an emphasis on economic applications. Topics include probability distributions, random variables, simple linear regression, estimation, hypothesis testing, and contingency table analysis. A weekly one-hour lab is part of this course in addition to three hours of class meetings per week. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) Credit is not given for ECON 0210 if the student has taken MATH 0116, MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0210Z-S12

CRN: 20310

Economic Statistics
Lab

Economic Statistics
Basic methods and concepts of statistical inference with an emphasis on economic applications. Topics include probability distributions, random variables, simple linear regression, estimation, hypothesis testing, and contingency table analysis. A weekly one-hour lab is part of this course in addition to three hours of class meetings per week. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) Credit is not given for ECON 0210 if the student has taken MATH 0116, MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0211A-S12

CRN: 20464

Regression Analysis

Introduction to Regression Analysis
In this course regression analysis is introduced. The major focus is on quantifying relationships between economic variables. Multiple regression identifies the effect of several exogenous variables on an endogenous variable. After exploring the classical regression model, fundamental assumptions underlying this model will be relaxed, and further new techniques will be introduced. Methods for testing hypotheses about the regression coefficients are developed throughout the course. Both theoretical principles and practical applications will be emphasized. The course goal is for each student to employ regression analysis as a research tool and to justify and defend the techniques used. (MATH 0121; and ECON 0150 or ECON 0155; and ECON 0210; or by approval) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0211B-S12

CRN: 20906

Regression Analysis

Introduction to Regression Analysis
In this course regression analysis is introduced. The major focus is on quantifying relationships between economic variables. Multiple regression identifies the effect of several exogenous variables on an endogenous variable. After exploring the classical regression model, fundamental assumptions underlying this model will be relaxed, and further new techniques will be introduced. Methods for testing hypotheses about the regression coefficients are developed throughout the course. Both theoretical principles and practical applications will be emphasized. The course goal is for each student to employ regression analysis as a research tool and to justify and defend the techniques used. (MATH 0121; and ECON 0150 or ECON 0155; and ECON 0210; or by approval) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0211W-S12

CRN: 20467

Regression Analysis
Lab

Introduction to Regression Analysis
In this course regression analysis is introduced. The major focus is on quantifying relationships between economic variables. Multiple regression identifies the effect of several exogenous variables on an endogenous variable. After exploring the classical regression model, fundamental assumptions underlying this model will be relaxed, and further new techniques will be introduced. Methods for testing hypotheses about the regression coefficients are developed throughout the course. Both theoretical principles and practical applications will be emphasized. The course goal is for each student to employ regression analysis as a research tool and to justify and defend the techniques used. (MATH 0121; and ECON 0150 or ECON 0155; and ECON 0210; or by approval) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0211X-S12

CRN: 20469

Regression Analysis
Lab

Introduction to Regression Analysis
In this course regression analysis is introduced. The major focus is on quantifying relationships between economic variables. Multiple regression identifies the effect of several exogenous variables on an endogenous variable. After exploring the classical regression model, fundamental assumptions underlying this model will be relaxed, and further new techniques will be introduced. Methods for testing hypotheses about the regression coefficients are developed throughout the course. Both theoretical principles and practical applications will be emphasized. The course goal is for each student to employ regression analysis as a research tool and to justify and defend the techniques used. (MATH 0121; and ECON 0150 or ECON 0155; and ECON 0210; or by approval) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0211Y-S12

CRN: 20470

Regression Analysis
Lab

Introduction to Regression Analysis
In this course regression analysis is introduced. The major focus is on quantifying relationships between economic variables. Multiple regression identifies the effect of several exogenous variables on an endogenous variable. After exploring the classical regression model, fundamental assumptions underlying this model will be relaxed, and further new techniques will be introduced. Methods for testing hypotheses about the regression coefficients are developed throughout the course. Both theoretical principles and practical applications will be emphasized. The course goal is for each student to employ regression analysis as a research tool and to justify and defend the techniques used. (MATH 0121; and ECON 0150 or ECON 0155; and ECON 0210; or by approval) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0211Z-S12

CRN: 20472

Regression Analysis
Lab

Introduction to Regression Analysis
In this course regression analysis is introduced. The major focus is on quantifying relationships between economic variables. Multiple regression identifies the effect of several exogenous variables on an endogenous variable. After exploring the classical regression model, fundamental assumptions underlying this model will be relaxed, and further new techniques will be introduced. Methods for testing hypotheses about the regression coefficients are developed throughout the course. Both theoretical principles and practical applications will be emphasized. The course goal is for each student to employ regression analysis as a research tool and to justify and defend the techniques used. (MATH 0121; and ECON 0150 or ECON 0155; and ECON 0210; or by approval) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0250A-S12

CRN: 20278

Macro Theory

Macroeconomic Theory
Macroeconomic theory analyzes whether the market effectively coordinates individuals' decisions so that they lead to acceptable results. It considers the effectiveness of monetary, fiscal, and other policies in achieving desirable levels of unemployment, inflation, and growth. The theories held by various schools of economic thought such as Keynesians, monetarists, and new classicals are considered along with their proposed policies. (ECON 0150) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0250B-S12

CRN: 20280

Macro Theory

Macroeconomic Theory
Macroeconomic theory analyzes whether the market effectively coordinates individuals' decisions so that they lead to acceptable results. It considers the effectiveness of monetary, fiscal, and other policies in achieving desirable levels of unemployment, inflation, and growth. The theories held by various schools of economic thought such as Keynesians, monetarists, and new classicals are considered along with their proposed policies. (ECON 0150) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0255A-S12

CRN: 20908

Micro Theory

Microeconomic Theory
Microeconomic theory concentrates on the study of the determination of relative prices and their importance in shaping the allocation of resources and the distribution of income in an economy. We will study the optimizing behavior of households in a variety of settings: buying goods and services, saving, and labor supply decisions. We will also examine the behavior of firms in different market structures. Together, the theories of household and firm behavior help illumine contemporary economic issues (discrimination in labor markets, mergers in the corporate world, positive and negative externalities, for example). (MATH 0121 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0255B-S12

CRN: 20907

Micro Theory

Microeconomic Theory
Microeconomic theory concentrates on the study of the determination of relative prices and their importance in shaping the allocation of resources and the distribution of income in an economy. We will study the optimizing behavior of households in a variety of settings: buying goods and services, saving, and labor supply decisions. We will also examine the behavior of firms in different market structures. Together, the theories of household and firm behavior help illumine contemporary economic issues (discrimination in labor markets, mergers in the corporate world, positive and negative externalities, for example). (MATH 0121 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0255C-S12

CRN: 21959

Micro Theory

Microeconomic Theory
Microeconomic theory concentrates on the study of the determination of relative prices and their importance in shaping the allocation of resources and the distribution of income in an economy. We will study the optimizing behavior of households in a variety of settings: buying goods and services, saving, and labor supply decisions. We will also examine the behavior of firms in different market structures. Together, the theories of household and firm behavior help illumine contemporary economic issues (discrimination in labor markets, mergers in the corporate world, positive and negative externalities, for example). (MATH 0121 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0255D-S12

CRN: 21960

Micro Theory

Microeconomic Theory
Microeconomic theory concentrates on the study of the determination of relative prices and their importance in shaping the allocation of resources and the distribution of income in an economy. We will study the optimizing behavior of households in a variety of settings: buying goods and services, saving, and labor supply decisions. We will also examine the behavior of firms in different market structures. Together, the theories of household and firm behavior help illumine contemporary economic issues (discrimination in labor markets, mergers in the corporate world, positive and negative externalities, for example). (MATH 0121 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0317A-S12

CRN: 20548

Investments/Financial Markets

Investments and Financial Markets
As wealth has grown in importance as an economic variable, professional economists and practitioners alike have studied the behavior of financial markets, and the behavior of people in those markets. The markets for equities, bonds, commodities, and foreign exchange are each quite independent, and yet prices in several markets may suddenly correlate, especially in a crisis. This course presents a wide range of techniques to analyze markets. In equities, we study valuation models and portfolio diversification. In bonds, we study the yield curve and concepts such as duration and convexity. In commodities, we study both fundamental analysis and technical analysis. In foreign exchange, we study interest rate parity and purchasing power parity. And, we study derivatives and options pricing models. The management of wealth ultimately depends on the management of risk, and we conclude with a study of risk management techniques. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155 and ECON 0210) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0317Y-S12

Cross-Listed As:
ECON0412Y-S12

CRN: 20740

Investments/Financial Markets
Lab

Investments and Financial Markets
As wealth has grown in importance as an economic variable, professional economists and practitioners alike have studied the behavior of financial markets, and the behavior of people in those markets. The markets for equities, bonds, commodities, and foreign exchange are each quite independent, and yet prices in several markets may suddenly correlate, especially in a crisis. This course presents a wide range of techniques to analyze markets. In equities, we study valuation models and portfolio diversification. In bonds, we study the yield curve and concepts such as duration and convexity. In commodities, we study both fundamental analysis and technical analysis. In foreign exchange, we study interest rate parity and purchasing power parity. And, we study derivatives and options pricing models. The management of wealth ultimately depends on the management of risk, and we conclude with a study of risk management techniques. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155 and ECON 0210) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0317Z-S12

Cross-Listed As:
ECON0412Z-S12

CRN: 20739

Investments/Financial Markets
Lab

Investments and Financial Markets
As wealth has grown in importance as an economic variable, professional economists and practitioners alike have studied the behavior of financial markets, and the behavior of people in those markets. The markets for equities, bonds, commodities, and foreign exchange are each quite independent, and yet prices in several markets may suddenly correlate, especially in a crisis. This course presents a wide range of techniques to analyze markets. In equities, we study valuation models and portfolio diversification. In bonds, we study the yield curve and concepts such as duration and convexity. In commodities, we study both fundamental analysis and technical analysis. In foreign exchange, we study interest rate parity and purchasing power parity. And, we study derivatives and options pricing models. The management of wealth ultimately depends on the management of risk, and we conclude with a study of risk management techniques. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155 and ECON 0210) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0336A-S12

Cross-Listed As:
PSCI0336A-S12

CRN: 22220

Political Econ of Development
Please register via PSCI 0336A

The Political Economy of Development
Why have some countries developed more rapidly than others? How can governments help or hinder the development process? In this course we will address these broad questions by analyzing the development of Asian, Latin American, and African countries. To gain a historical perspective we will begin with the experiences of the now "developed" countries, followed by an examination of how countries have confronted the dilemmas of development, such as corruption, income inequality, and environmental degradation. By studying development through a political economy lens, we will present the intersections between a political and economic understanding of the complex process of development. (Not open to students who have taken PSCI/ECON 1027)

ECON0336X-S12

Cross-Listed As:
PSCI0336X-S12

CRN: 22318

Political Econ of Development
Please register via PSCI 0336X

The Political Economy of Development
Why have some countries developed more rapidly than others? How can governments help or hinder the development process? In this course we will address these broad questions by analyzing the development of Asian, Latin American, and African countries. To gain a historical perspective we will begin with the experiences of the now "developed" countries, followed by an examination of how countries have confronted the dilemmas of development, such as corruption, income inequality, and environmental degradation. By studying development through a political economy lens, we will present the intersections between a political and economic understanding of the complex process of development. (Not open to students who have taken PSCI/ECON 1027)

ECON0336Y-S12

Cross-Listed As:
PSCI0336Y-S12

CRN: 22319

Political Econ of Development
Please register via PSCI 0336Y

The Political Economy of Development
Why have some countries developed more rapidly than others? How can governments help or hinder the development process? In this course we will address these broad questions by analyzing the development of Asian, Latin American, and African countries. To gain a historical perspective we will begin with the experiences of the now "developed" countries, followed by an examination of how countries have confronted the dilemmas of development, such as corruption, income inequality, and environmental degradation. By studying development through a political economy lens, we will present the intersections between a political and economic understanding of the complex process of development. (Not open to students who have taken PSCI/ECON 1027)

ECON0338A-S12

CRN: 22337

The Japanese Economy

The Japanese Economy
The Japanese economy offers not only some interesting and idiosyncratic features, but also key insights into current economic issues in China and the United States. In this course we will start with the devastation of postwar Japan and then ask how the Japanese addressed pressing economic issues. We will analyze the Japanese fiscal, monetary, and trade policies adopted within Japan and explore how these policies reflected and influenced the financial, business, and labor sectors. We will also trace how Japan's success in constructing a low risk, middle-class society eventually precipitated the problems in the 1990’s that remain unresolved. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0338B-S12

CRN: 22338

The Japanese Economy

The Japanese Economy
The Japanese economy offers not only some interesting and idiosyncratic features, but also key insights into current economic issues in China and the United States. In this course we will start with the devastation of postwar Japan and then ask how the Japanese addressed pressing economic issues. We will analyze the Japanese fiscal, monetary, and trade policies adopted within Japan and explore how these policies reflected and influenced the financial, business, and labor sectors. We will also trace how Japan's success in constructing a low risk, middle-class society eventually precipitated the problems in the 1990’s that remain unresolved. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0340A-S12

CRN: 20102

Int'l Econ: A Policy Approach

International Economics: A Policy Approach
This course provides an overview of international trade and finance. We will discuss why countries trade, the concepts of absolute and comparative advantage, and gains from trade. We will explore commercial policies, arguments for and against tariffs, non-tariff barriers, dumping and subsidies, the role of the WTO, as well as the pros and cons of regional free trade associations. In the second part of the course we will primarily concentrate on international macroeconomics, focusing on foreign exchange rates, balance of payments, origins of and solutions to financial crises and the history and architecture of the international monetary system. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0360A-S12

CRN: 21961

Econ of Imperfect Competition

Industrial Organization: Economics of Imperfect Competition
Industrial organization is the study of how industries function and how firms interact within an industry. While this is part of the general agenda of microeconomics, industrial organization distinguishes itself by its emphasis on the study of firm behavior in imperfectly competitive markets. The primary objective of this course is to investigate how firms acquire market power, that is, the ability to influence price, and how this power is used in practice. The major themes of exploration will be the sources and limits of market power; the strategic behavior of firms that possess market power; and the effect of policy intervention in industries with market power. We will be particularly interested in the role of limited information; advertising expenditure; barriers to entry; and investment in research and development. (ECON 0255) 3 hrs. sem.

ECON0375A-S12

CRN: 21962

Monetary Theory and Policy

Monetary Theory and Policy
This course will cover the determination of interest rates, portfolio theory, the demand for money, and the supply of money process. Emphasis will be on the difficulties faced by the Federal Reserve in its goals of achieving a steady growth in aggregate demand while doing its best to ensure that monetary disorder, such as that which characterized the Great Depression, does not reoccur. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155) (Two sections will be offered.) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0380A-S12

CRN: 21483

Game Theory
Game Theory I

Game Theory I
Game theory is general in scope and has been used to provide theoretical foundations for phenomena in most of the social and behavioral sciences. Economic examples include market organization, bargaining, and the provision of public goods. Examples from other behavioral sciences include social dilemmas and population dynamics. In this course students learn the basics of what constitutes a game and how games are solved. This course is meant to be a broad introduction; students with advanced training in economics (or math) are encouraged to enroll directly in ECON 0390. (ECON 0155 and MATH 0121 required; ECON 0255 recommended) 3 hrs. sem.

ECON0412A-S12

CRN: 20582

Empirical Finance

Empirical Finance
How do hi-tech firms decide to launch new products? How do portfolio managers decide to invest in stocks of hi-tech companies? These are the kinds of practical issues we will cover in this course. Modern financial theory and practice revolve around quantitative techniques for estimating expected returns on investments, whether the launch of a new product or the creation of a new mutual fund, and for measuring the performance of those investments over time. In the first part of the course, you will delve into cash flow analysis as it can be applied to a wide range of situations. In the second part, you will study financial markets and techniques for trading and investing in those markets. At the end you will create an investment portfolio based on your own areas of expertise and your own style of investing. (ECON 0211 and ECON 0316) 3 hrs. sem., 1 hr. lab

ECON0412B-S12

CRN: 20584

Empirical Finance

Empirical Finance
How do hi-tech firms decide to launch new products? How do portfolio managers decide to invest in stocks of hi-tech companies? These are the kinds of practical issues we will cover in this course. Modern financial theory and practice revolve around quantitative techniques for estimating expected returns on investments, whether the launch of a new product or the creation of a new mutual fund, and for measuring the performance of those investments over time. In the first part of the course, you will delve into cash flow analysis as it can be applied to a wide range of situations. In the second part, you will study financial markets and techniques for trading and investing in those markets. At the end you will create an investment portfolio based on your own areas of expertise and your own style of investing. (ECON 0211 and ECON 0316) 3 hrs. sem., 1 hr. lab

ECON0412Y-S12

Cross-Listed As:
ECON0317Y-S12

CRN: 20742

Empirical Finance
Lab

Empirical Finance
How do hi-tech firms decide to launch new products? How do portfolio managers decide to invest in stocks of hi-tech companies? These are the kinds of practical issues we will cover in this course. Modern financial theory and practice revolve around quantitative techniques for estimating expected returns on investments, whether the launch of a new product or the creation of a new mutual fund, and for measuring the performance of those investments over time. In the first part of the course, you will delve into cash flow analysis as it can be applied to a wide range of situations. In the second part, you will study financial markets and techniques for trading and investing in those markets. At the end you will create an investment portfolio based on your own areas of expertise and your own style of investing. (ECON 0211 and ECON 0316) 3 hrs. sem., 1 hr. lab

ECON0412Z-S12

Cross-Listed As:
ECON0317Z-S12

CRN: 20741

Empirical Finance
Lab

Empirical Finance
How do hi-tech firms decide to launch new products? How do portfolio managers decide to invest in stocks of hi-tech companies? These are the kinds of practical issues we will cover in this course. Modern financial theory and practice revolve around quantitative techniques for estimating expected returns on investments, whether the launch of a new product or the creation of a new mutual fund, and for measuring the performance of those investments over time. In the first part of the course, you will delve into cash flow analysis as it can be applied to a wide range of situations. In the second part, you will study financial markets and techniques for trading and investing in those markets. At the end you will create an investment portfolio based on your own areas of expertise and your own style of investing. (ECON 0211 and ECON 0316) 3 hrs. sem., 1 hr. lab

ECON0424A-S12

CRN: 21963

Econ Prosperity Global Economy

Economic Prosperity in the Global Economy
The forces of globalization have powerful and controversial effects today, but this phenomenon has deep historical roots. At the center of the globalization debate is whether prosperity is delivered to developing countries. In this course we will study the transformation to the global economy by exploring commodity, labor, and capital markets from a historical perspective. We will analyze the links among the economic dimensions of globalization, development, and growth. Our objective will be to examine the characteristics and evolution of globalization and its impact on overall growth, education, health, inequality, and poverty. (ECON 0250 or ECON 0255) 3 hrs. sem.

ECON0430A-S12

CRN: 22272

Post-Communist Econ Transition

The Post-Communist Economic Transition
This seminar will use the “natural experiment” of the post-communist transition to better understand the origin and consequences of various economic and political institutions. Drawing on research related to China and Russia as well as other formerly communist economies in Europe and Asia, we will explore such themes as property rights reform, the finance-growth nexus, contract enforcement institutions, and the economic consequences of corruption and different political regimes. (ECON 0210 or MATH 0310 or MATH 0311 or by approval)

ECON0445A-S12

CRN: 21225

International Finance

International Finance
An analysis of the world's financial system and the consequences for open economies of macroeconomic interdependence. Particular topics include: exchange rate determination, balance of payments adjustments, and monetary and fiscal policies in open economies. Special attention is paid to the issues and problems of the European Economic Community and European integration and debt in developing countries. (ECON 0250) 3 hrs. sem.

ECON0465A-S12

CRN: 21492

Environmental Economics Topics

Special Topics in Environmental Economics
The objective of this seminar is that each student achieves fluency in a set of advanced concepts in environmental economics. The seminar is divided into two main sections. First, we introduce the core theory and policy implications of environmental economics. These include the theory of externalities and public goods; the Coase theorem; and policy instrument choice. Empirical methods used to measure the costs and benefits of environmental policies are also introduced. Second, we study some selected topics: the economics of local air pollution and greenhouse gases; the design of market-based environmental policies; the economics of non-renewable resources, including fossil fuels and old-growth forests; and the management of renewable resources, including fisheries and second-growth forest resources. (ECON 0255) (There will be two sections offered.) 3 hrs. sem.

ECON0495A-S12

CRN: 21836

Behavioral Economics

Behavioral Economics
In this seminar we will study a range of psychological phenomena that affect economic behavior in individual and social settings. Particular emphasis will be placed on the relationship between psychology and economic theory, and the extent to which the study of economics can be improved by incorporating research on human emotions and bounded cognitive ability. A second point of emphasis will concern what the psychological-economic view of human motivation and behavior implies for debates over public policy. (ECON 0255 required; ECON 0380 strongly recommended) 3 hrs. sem.

ECON0499A-S12

CRN: 21898

Experimental Economics

Experimental Economics
We examine how people actually behave given economic incentives. Rather than learning economic models of behavior (e.g., consumption, investment, production) students in this class learn how to test these and other models using the experimental lab. Topics include: How and why do markets work? Do people act collectively to provide public goods? What are the determinants of bargaining outcomes? (ECON 0255 required; ECON 0380 strongly recommended) 3 hrs. sem.

ECON0500A-S12

CRN: 20081

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500B-S12

CRN: 20779

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500C-S12

CRN: 20924

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500E-S12

CRN: 20972

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500J-S12

CRN: 20977

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500K-S12

CRN: 20978

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500L-S12

CRN: 20979

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500N-S12

CRN: 20981

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500Q-S12

CRN: 20984

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500U-S12

CRN: 20988

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0700A-S12

CRN: 21290

Senior Research

Senior Research Workshop
Prior to enrolling in ECON 0700, students must have taken a minimum of 6 economics courses at Middlebury approved to count towards the major requirements. These senior workshops will be composed of no more than eight students who will work independently on a project in a specific area for two semesters (fall/winter or winter/spring) and will meet to collectively discuss and present their research. Students who have prearranged a research topic with the professor will be given priority in admission to the seminar. Also, because of limited resources for guiding senior work, students with a single major in economics will be given priority over double majors who will do senior work in other departments. Students interested in pursuing departmental honors must take a Senior Research Workshop (ECON 0700) during their senior year. To receive departmental honors the student must receive a minimum grade of A- in the Senior Research Workshop project and have a 3.5 or higher GPA in all economics courses taken at Middlebury approved to count towards the major requirements. High Honors requires an A in the Senior Research Seminar and a 3.75 or higher economics GPA, and Highest Honors an A in the seminar and a 3.9 or higher economics GPA. (Approval required)

ECON0700B-S12

CRN: 21291

Senior Research

Senior Research Workshop
Prior to enrolling in ECON 0700, students must have taken a minimum of 6 economics courses at Middlebury approved to count towards the major requirements. These senior workshops will be composed of no more than eight students who will work independently on a project in a specific area for two semesters (fall/winter or winter/spring) and will meet to collectively discuss and present their research. Students who have prearranged a research topic with the professor will be given priority in admission to the seminar. Also, because of limited resources for guiding senior work, students with a single major in economics will be given priority over double majors who will do senior work in other departments. Students interested in pursuing departmental honors must take a Senior Research Workshop (ECON 0700) during their senior year. To receive departmental honors the student must receive a minimum grade of A- in the Senior Research Workshop project and have a 3.5 or higher GPA in all economics courses taken at Middlebury approved to count towards the major requirements. High Honors requires an A in the Senior Research Seminar and a 3.75 or higher economics GPA, and Highest Honors an A in the seminar and a 3.9 or higher economics GPA. (Approval required)

ECON0700C-S12

CRN: 21837

Senior Research

Senior Research Workshop
Prior to enrolling in ECON 0700, students must have taken a minimum of 6 economics courses at Middlebury approved to count towards the major requirements. These senior workshops will be composed of no more than eight students who will work independently on a project in a specific area for two semesters (fall/winter or winter/spring) and will meet to collectively discuss and present their research. Students who have prearranged a research topic with the professor will be given priority in admission to the seminar. Also, because of limited resources for guiding senior work, students with a single major in economics will be given priority over double majors who will do senior work in other departments. Students interested in pursuing departmental honors must take a Senior Research Workshop (ECON 0700) during their senior year. To receive departmental honors the student must receive a minimum grade of A- in the Senior Research Workshop project and have a 3.5 or higher GPA in all economics courses taken at Middlebury approved to count towards the major requirements. High Honors requires an A in the Senior Research Seminar and a 3.75 or higher economics GPA, and Highest Honors an A in the seminar and a 3.9 or higher economics GPA. (Approval required)