Middlebury

 

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ECON0150A-F12

CRN: 90492

Intro Macroeconomics

Introductory Macroeconomics
An introduction to macroeconomics: a consideration of macroeconomic problems such as unemployment and inflation. Theories and policy proposals of Keynesian and classical economists are contrasted. Topics considered include: banking, financial institutions, monetary policy, taxation, government spending, fiscal policy, tradeoffs between inflation and unemployment in both the short run and the long run, and wage-price spirals. 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0150B-F12

CRN: 90495

Intro Macroeconomics

Introductory Macroeconomics
An introduction to macroeconomics: a consideration of macroeconomic problems such as unemployment and inflation. Theories and policy proposals of Keynesian and classical economists are contrasted. Topics considered include: banking, financial institutions, monetary policy, taxation, government spending, fiscal policy, tradeoffs between inflation and unemployment in both the short run and the long run, and wage-price spirals. 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0150C-F12

CRN: 90493

Intro Macroeconomics

Introductory Macroeconomics
An introduction to macroeconomics: a consideration of macroeconomic problems such as unemployment and inflation. Theories and policy proposals of Keynesian and classical economists are contrasted. Topics considered include: banking, financial institutions, monetary policy, taxation, government spending, fiscal policy, tradeoffs between inflation and unemployment in both the short run and the long run, and wage-price spirals. 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0150D-F12

CRN: 90498

Intro Macroeconomics

Introductory Macroeconomics
An introduction to macroeconomics: a consideration of macroeconomic problems such as unemployment and inflation. Theories and policy proposals of Keynesian and classical economists are contrasted. Topics considered include: banking, financial institutions, monetary policy, taxation, government spending, fiscal policy, tradeoffs between inflation and unemployment in both the short run and the long run, and wage-price spirals. 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0155A-F12

CRN: 90501

Intro Microeconomics

Introductory Microeconomics
An introduction to the analysis of such microeconomic problems as price formation (the forces behind demand and supply), market structures from competitive to oligopolistic, distribution of income, and public policy options bearing on these problems. 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0155B-F12

CRN: 90502

Intro Microeconomics

Introductory Microeconomics
An introduction to the analysis of such microeconomic problems as price formation (the forces behind demand and supply), market structures from competitive to oligopolistic, distribution of income, and public policy options bearing on these problems. 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0155C-F12

CRN: 90503

Intro Microeconomics

Introductory Microeconomics
An introduction to the analysis of such microeconomic problems as price formation (the forces behind demand and supply), market structures from competitive to oligopolistic, distribution of income, and public policy options bearing on these problems. 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0155D-F12

CRN: 90507

Intro Microeconomics

Introductory Microeconomics
An introduction to the analysis of such microeconomic problems as price formation (the forces behind demand and supply), market structures from competitive to oligopolistic, distribution of income, and public policy options bearing on these problems. 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0155E-F12

CRN: 91603

Intro Microeconomics

Introductory Microeconomics
An introduction to the analysis of such microeconomic problems as price formation (the forces behind demand and supply), market structures from competitive to oligopolistic, distribution of income, and public policy options bearing on these problems. 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0210A-F12

CRN: 90512

Economic Statistics

Economic Statistics
Basic methods and concepts of statistical inference with an emphasis on economic applications. Topics include probability distributions, random variables, simple linear regression, estimation, hypothesis testing, and contingency table analysis. A weekly one-hour lab is part of this course in addition to three hours of class meetings per week. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) Credit is not given for ECON 0210 if the student has taken MATH 0116, MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0210B-F12

CRN: 90513

Economic Statistics

Economic Statistics
Basic methods and concepts of statistical inference with an emphasis on economic applications. Topics include probability distributions, random variables, simple linear regression, estimation, hypothesis testing, and contingency table analysis. A weekly one-hour lab is part of this course in addition to three hours of class meetings per week. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) Credit is not given for ECON 0210 if the student has taken MATH 0116, MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0210C-F12

CRN: 92810

Economic Statistics

Economic Statistics
Basic methods and concepts of statistical inference with an emphasis on economic applications. Topics include probability distributions, random variables, simple linear regression, estimation, hypothesis testing, and contingency table analysis. A weekly one-hour lab is part of this course in addition to three hours of class meetings per week. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) Credit is not given for ECON 0210 if the student has taken MATH 0116, MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0210V-F12

CRN: 92813

Economic Statistics
Econ Stats Lab-ECON 0210 C

Economic Statistics
Basic methods and concepts of statistical inference with an emphasis on economic applications. Topics include probability distributions, random variables, simple linear regression, estimation, hypothesis testing, and contingency table analysis. A weekly one-hour lab is part of this course in addition to three hours of class meetings per week. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) Credit is not given for ECON 0210 if the student has taken MATH 0116, MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0210W-F12

CRN: 90514

Economic Statistics
Econ Stats Lab-ECON 0210 C

Economic Statistics
Basic methods and concepts of statistical inference with an emphasis on economic applications. Topics include probability distributions, random variables, simple linear regression, estimation, hypothesis testing, and contingency table analysis. A weekly one-hour lab is part of this course in addition to three hours of class meetings per week. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) Credit is not given for ECON 0210 if the student has taken MATH 0116, MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0210X-F12

CRN: 90515

Economic Statistics
Econ Stat Lab-ECON 0210 A or B

Economic Statistics
Basic methods and concepts of statistical inference with an emphasis on economic applications. Topics include probability distributions, random variables, simple linear regression, estimation, hypothesis testing, and contingency table analysis. A weekly one-hour lab is part of this course in addition to three hours of class meetings per week. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) Credit is not given for ECON 0210 if the student has taken MATH 0116, MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0210Y-F12

CRN: 90516

Economic Statistics
Econ Stat Lab-ECON 0210 A or B

Economic Statistics
Basic methods and concepts of statistical inference with an emphasis on economic applications. Topics include probability distributions, random variables, simple linear regression, estimation, hypothesis testing, and contingency table analysis. A weekly one-hour lab is part of this course in addition to three hours of class meetings per week. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) Credit is not given for ECON 0210 if the student has taken MATH 0116, MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0210Z-F12

CRN: 90517

Economic Statistics
Econ Stat Lab-ECON 0210 A or B

Economic Statistics
Basic methods and concepts of statistical inference with an emphasis on economic applications. Topics include probability distributions, random variables, simple linear regression, estimation, hypothesis testing, and contingency table analysis. A weekly one-hour lab is part of this course in addition to three hours of class meetings per week. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) Credit is not given for ECON 0210 if the student has taken MATH 0116, MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0211A-F12

CRN: 90739

Regression Analysis

Introduction to Regression Analysis
In this course regression analysis is introduced. The major focus is on quantifying relationships between economic variables. Multiple regression identifies the effect of several exogenous variables on an endogenous variable. After exploring the classical regression model, fundamental assumptions underlying this model will be relaxed, and further new techniques will be introduced. Methods for testing hypotheses about the regression coefficients are developed throughout the course. Both theoretical principles and practical applications will be emphasized. The course goal is for each student to employ regression analysis as a research tool and to justify and defend the techniques used. (MATH 0121; and ECON 0150 or ECON 0155; and ECON 0210; or by approval) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0211B-F12

CRN: 90942

Regression Analysis

Introduction to Regression Analysis
In this course regression analysis is introduced. The major focus is on quantifying relationships between economic variables. Multiple regression identifies the effect of several exogenous variables on an endogenous variable. After exploring the classical regression model, fundamental assumptions underlying this model will be relaxed, and further new techniques will be introduced. Methods for testing hypotheses about the regression coefficients are developed throughout the course. Both theoretical principles and practical applications will be emphasized. The course goal is for each student to employ regression analysis as a research tool and to justify and defend the techniques used. (MATH 0121; and ECON 0150 or ECON 0155; and ECON 0210; or by approval) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0211W-F12

CRN: 91172

Regression Analysis
Lab

Introduction to Regression Analysis
In this course regression analysis is introduced. The major focus is on quantifying relationships between economic variables. Multiple regression identifies the effect of several exogenous variables on an endogenous variable. After exploring the classical regression model, fundamental assumptions underlying this model will be relaxed, and further new techniques will be introduced. Methods for testing hypotheses about the regression coefficients are developed throughout the course. Both theoretical principles and practical applications will be emphasized. The course goal is for each student to employ regression analysis as a research tool and to justify and defend the techniques used. (MATH 0121; and ECON 0150 or ECON 0155; and ECON 0210; or by approval) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0211X-F12

CRN: 90943

Regression Analysis
Lab

Introduction to Regression Analysis
In this course regression analysis is introduced. The major focus is on quantifying relationships between economic variables. Multiple regression identifies the effect of several exogenous variables on an endogenous variable. After exploring the classical regression model, fundamental assumptions underlying this model will be relaxed, and further new techniques will be introduced. Methods for testing hypotheses about the regression coefficients are developed throughout the course. Both theoretical principles and practical applications will be emphasized. The course goal is for each student to employ regression analysis as a research tool and to justify and defend the techniques used. (MATH 0121; and ECON 0150 or ECON 0155; and ECON 0210; or by approval) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0211Y-F12

CRN: 90742

Regression Analysis
Lab

Introduction to Regression Analysis
In this course regression analysis is introduced. The major focus is on quantifying relationships between economic variables. Multiple regression identifies the effect of several exogenous variables on an endogenous variable. After exploring the classical regression model, fundamental assumptions underlying this model will be relaxed, and further new techniques will be introduced. Methods for testing hypotheses about the regression coefficients are developed throughout the course. Both theoretical principles and practical applications will be emphasized. The course goal is for each student to employ regression analysis as a research tool and to justify and defend the techniques used. (MATH 0121; and ECON 0150 or ECON 0155; and ECON 0210; or by approval) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0211Z-F12

CRN: 90740

Regression Analysis
Lab

Introduction to Regression Analysis
In this course regression analysis is introduced. The major focus is on quantifying relationships between economic variables. Multiple regression identifies the effect of several exogenous variables on an endogenous variable. After exploring the classical regression model, fundamental assumptions underlying this model will be relaxed, and further new techniques will be introduced. Methods for testing hypotheses about the regression coefficients are developed throughout the course. Both theoretical principles and practical applications will be emphasized. The course goal is for each student to employ regression analysis as a research tool and to justify and defend the techniques used. (MATH 0121; and ECON 0150 or ECON 0155; and ECON 0210; or by approval) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0220A-F12

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0220A-F12

CRN: 91658

American Economic History

American Economic History since 1900
This course will provide an overview of the major themes in the growth and development of the modern American economy. Topics will include the economic history of railroads, automobiles, foreign trade, banks and financial markets. We will also examine the role of the courts and government policy in American economic development, with special emphasis on the rise and decline of Laissez-Faire as the dominant mode of economic regulation in the nation's labor and financial markets. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0228A-F12

CRN: 91763

Econ of Agricultural Transtion

Economics of Agricultural Transition
In 1860 farmers made up over half the population of this country and fed about 30 million people. Today they number 2% of the population and produce more than enough to feed 300 million people. In this course we will look at the history, causes, and results of this incredible transformation. While studying the economic forces behind the changing farming structure, we will examine farm production, resources, technology, and agricultural policy. Field trips to local farms and screenings of farm-related videos and movies will incorporate the viewpoint of those engaged in agriculture. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) 2hrs. lect., 2 hrs. lab

ECON0230A-F12

CRN: 91464

Transformation in Eurasia

Comparative Transformation in Eurasia
In this course we will explore the transformation over the past generation of Eurasia’s formerly socialist economies. We will focus on the experiences of the region’s two largest countries, Russia and China. Though the main focus is on economic aspects of the transformation, we will also pay attention to the political and historical forces that have influenced the process. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155; or by approval) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0250A-F12

CRN: 90467

Macro Theory

Macroeconomic Theory
Macroeconomic theory analyzes whether the market effectively coordinates individuals' decisions so that they lead to acceptable results. It considers the effectiveness of monetary, fiscal, and other policies in achieving desirable levels of unemployment, inflation, and growth. The theories held by various schools of economic thought such as Keynesians, monetarists, and new classicals are considered along with their proposed policies. (ECON 0150) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0250B-F12

CRN: 90469

Macro Theory

Macroeconomic Theory
Macroeconomic theory analyzes whether the market effectively coordinates individuals' decisions so that they lead to acceptable results. It considers the effectiveness of monetary, fiscal, and other policies in achieving desirable levels of unemployment, inflation, and growth. The theories held by various schools of economic thought such as Keynesians, monetarists, and new classicals are considered along with their proposed policies. (ECON 0150) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0250W-F12

CRN: 92814

Macro Theory
Discussion- ECON 0250 A or B

Macroeconomic Theory
Macroeconomic theory analyzes whether the market effectively coordinates individuals' decisions so that they lead to acceptable results. It considers the effectiveness of monetary, fiscal, and other policies in achieving desirable levels of unemployment, inflation, and growth. The theories held by various schools of economic thought such as Keynesians, monetarists, and new classicals are considered along with their proposed policies. (ECON 0150) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0250X-F12

CRN: 92815

Macro Theory
Discussion- ECON 0250 A or B

Macroeconomic Theory
Macroeconomic theory analyzes whether the market effectively coordinates individuals' decisions so that they lead to acceptable results. It considers the effectiveness of monetary, fiscal, and other policies in achieving desirable levels of unemployment, inflation, and growth. The theories held by various schools of economic thought such as Keynesians, monetarists, and new classicals are considered along with their proposed policies. (ECON 0150) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0250Y-F12

CRN: 92816

Macro Theory
Discussion- ECON 0250 A or B

Macroeconomic Theory
Macroeconomic theory analyzes whether the market effectively coordinates individuals' decisions so that they lead to acceptable results. It considers the effectiveness of monetary, fiscal, and other policies in achieving desirable levels of unemployment, inflation, and growth. The theories held by various schools of economic thought such as Keynesians, monetarists, and new classicals are considered along with their proposed policies. (ECON 0150) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0250Z-F12

CRN: 92817

Macro Theory
Discussion- ECON 0250 A or B

Macroeconomic Theory
Macroeconomic theory analyzes whether the market effectively coordinates individuals' decisions so that they lead to acceptable results. It considers the effectiveness of monetary, fiscal, and other policies in achieving desirable levels of unemployment, inflation, and growth. The theories held by various schools of economic thought such as Keynesians, monetarists, and new classicals are considered along with their proposed policies. (ECON 0150) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0255A-F12

CRN: 90432

Micro Theory

Microeconomic Theory
Microeconomic theory concentrates on the study of the determination of relative prices and their importance in shaping the allocation of resources and the distribution of income in an economy. We will study the optimizing behavior of households in a variety of settings: buying goods and services, saving, and labor supply decisions. We will also examine the behavior of firms in different market structures. Together, the theories of household and firm behavior help illumine contemporary economic issues (discrimination in labor markets, mergers in the corporate world, positive and negative externalities, for example). (MATH 0121 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0255B-F12

CRN: 90760

Micro Theory

Microeconomic Theory
Microeconomic theory concentrates on the study of the determination of relative prices and their importance in shaping the allocation of resources and the distribution of income in an economy. We will study the optimizing behavior of households in a variety of settings: buying goods and services, saving, and labor supply decisions. We will also examine the behavior of firms in different market structures. Together, the theories of household and firm behavior help illumine contemporary economic issues (discrimination in labor markets, mergers in the corporate world, positive and negative externalities, for example). (MATH 0121 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0255C-F12

CRN: 91659

Micro Theory

Microeconomic Theory
Microeconomic theory concentrates on the study of the determination of relative prices and their importance in shaping the allocation of resources and the distribution of income in an economy. We will study the optimizing behavior of households in a variety of settings: buying goods and services, saving, and labor supply decisions. We will also examine the behavior of firms in different market structures. Together, the theories of household and firm behavior help illumine contemporary economic issues (discrimination in labor markets, mergers in the corporate world, positive and negative externalities, for example). (MATH 0121 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0255X-F12

CRN: 92818

Micro Theory
Discussion- ECON 0255 A or B

Microeconomic Theory
Microeconomic theory concentrates on the study of the determination of relative prices and their importance in shaping the allocation of resources and the distribution of income in an economy. We will study the optimizing behavior of households in a variety of settings: buying goods and services, saving, and labor supply decisions. We will also examine the behavior of firms in different market structures. Together, the theories of household and firm behavior help illumine contemporary economic issues (discrimination in labor markets, mergers in the corporate world, positive and negative externalities, for example). (MATH 0121 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0255Y-F12

CRN: 92819

Micro Theory
Discussion- ECON 0255 A or B

Microeconomic Theory
Microeconomic theory concentrates on the study of the determination of relative prices and their importance in shaping the allocation of resources and the distribution of income in an economy. We will study the optimizing behavior of households in a variety of settings: buying goods and services, saving, and labor supply decisions. We will also examine the behavior of firms in different market structures. Together, the theories of household and firm behavior help illumine contemporary economic issues (discrimination in labor markets, mergers in the corporate world, positive and negative externalities, for example). (MATH 0121 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0255Z-F12

CRN: 92820

Micro Theory
Discussion- ECON 0255 A or B

Microeconomic Theory
Microeconomic theory concentrates on the study of the determination of relative prices and their importance in shaping the allocation of resources and the distribution of income in an economy. We will study the optimizing behavior of households in a variety of settings: buying goods and services, saving, and labor supply decisions. We will also examine the behavior of firms in different market structures. Together, the theories of household and firm behavior help illumine contemporary economic issues (discrimination in labor markets, mergers in the corporate world, positive and negative externalities, for example). (MATH 0121 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0265A-F12

CRN: 91472

Environmental Economics

Environmental Economics
This course is dedicated to the proposition that economic reasoning is critical for analyzing the persistence of environmental damage and for designing cost-effective environmental policies. The objectives of the course are that each student (a) understands the economic approach to the environment; (b) can use microeconomics to illustrate the theory of environmental policy; and (c) comprehends and can critically evaluate: alternative environmental standards, benefits and costs of environmental protection, incentive-based environmental policies, socially responsible business practices, the role of social capital in determining environmental outcomes, and challenges in the global commons. (ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0275A-F12

CRN: 91661

Urban Economics

Urban Economics
How and why do cities form? Why do people live in the suburbs and commute to the Central Business District? Why do tech industries want to locate right next to each other in Silicon Valley? Are toll roads just there to annoy us, or is there some economic rationale for them? This course combines economic theory and empirical evidence to provide an overview of the forces beyond our spatial organization as well as a survey of urban problems relating to land use, traffic, housing, and racial segregation. (ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0311A-F12

CRN: 92987

Theoretical Econometrics

Theoretical Econometrics
Theoretical Econometrics will introduce students to the theoretical reasoning underpinning regression analysis as covered in ECON 0211. The course will begin with regression analysis as a method of data summary, focusing on geometric properties that hold for all data sets. We will introduce progressively the assumptions of the classical linear regression model to provide clear relationships between probabilistic assumptions and statistical properties and the arguments that justify them. We will conclude by exploring generalizations to basic regression that are motivated by violations of the classical assumptions. Throughout the course, students will encounter the interaction between economic and econometric modeling. (ECON 0211) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0316A-F12

CRN: 90367

Corporate Finance
Corporate Finance & Accounting

Corporate Finance and Accounting
Finance has become an integral part of economics, as shown by the number of Nobel Prizes awarded in recent years to scholars who have made contributions to the field. This course focuses on the financial side of the modern corporation, for the stakeholders as well as the shareholders. We start with financial accounting as a means of measuring the health of a company and of discerning the transparency and accuracy of its financial statements. (As Enron and other companies showed, it pays to be skeptical.) We then move to strategic planning and the growth of the firm, and to decisions on how to finance that growth as between equity and debt. We conclude with valuation models based on cash flow. At the end we hold a buy-side sell-side competition, in which students work in teams to value real companies and present them to the class as attractive investments. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0316X-F12

CRN: 91191

Corporate Finance
Lab

Corporate Finance and Accounting
Finance has become an integral part of economics, as shown by the number of Nobel Prizes awarded in recent years to scholars who have made contributions to the field. This course focuses on the financial side of the modern corporation, for the stakeholders as well as the shareholders. We start with financial accounting as a means of measuring the health of a company and of discerning the transparency and accuracy of its financial statements. (As Enron and other companies showed, it pays to be skeptical.) We then move to strategic planning and the growth of the firm, and to decisions on how to finance that growth as between equity and debt. We conclude with valuation models based on cash flow. At the end we hold a buy-side sell-side competition, in which students work in teams to value real companies and present them to the class as attractive investments. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0316Y-F12

CRN: 90370

Corporate Finance
Lab

Corporate Finance and Accounting
Finance has become an integral part of economics, as shown by the number of Nobel Prizes awarded in recent years to scholars who have made contributions to the field. This course focuses on the financial side of the modern corporation, for the stakeholders as well as the shareholders. We start with financial accounting as a means of measuring the health of a company and of discerning the transparency and accuracy of its financial statements. (As Enron and other companies showed, it pays to be skeptical.) We then move to strategic planning and the growth of the firm, and to decisions on how to finance that growth as between equity and debt. We conclude with valuation models based on cash flow. At the end we hold a buy-side sell-side competition, in which students work in teams to value real companies and present them to the class as attractive investments. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0316Z-F12

CRN: 90358

Corporate Finance
Lab

Corporate Finance and Accounting
Finance has become an integral part of economics, as shown by the number of Nobel Prizes awarded in recent years to scholars who have made contributions to the field. This course focuses on the financial side of the modern corporation, for the stakeholders as well as the shareholders. We start with financial accounting as a means of measuring the health of a company and of discerning the transparency and accuracy of its financial statements. (As Enron and other companies showed, it pays to be skeptical.) We then move to strategic planning and the growth of the firm, and to decisions on how to finance that growth as between equity and debt. We conclude with valuation models based on cash flow. At the end we hold a buy-side sell-side competition, in which students work in teams to value real companies and present them to the class as attractive investments. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

ECON0328A-F12

CRN: 92855

Economics of Global Health

Economics of Global Health
In this course we will examine global health from an economics perspective while attempting to understand it from both the demand and supply sides. We will review the current economic research relevant to these topics. Microeconomic theory will be used to explain why individuals might make what are seemingly poor health decisions. In addition, we will be using data from the Demographic Health Surveys to examine the health and well-being of individuals living in poor countries. Topics will include the effects of HIV/AIDS, malaria, and poor sanitation. (ECON 0210 and ECON 0255) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0340A-F12

CRN: 90241

Int'l Econ: A Policy Approach

International Economics: A Policy Approach
This course provides an overview of international trade and finance. We will discuss why countries trade, the concepts of absolute and comparative advantage, and gains from trade. We will explore commercial policies, arguments for and against tariffs, non-tariff barriers, dumping and subsidies, the role of the WTO, as well as the pros and cons of regional free trade associations. In the second part of the course we will primarily concentrate on international macroeconomics, focusing on foreign exchange rates, balance of payments, origins of and solutions to financial crises and the history and architecture of the international monetary system. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0362A-F12

CRN: 92990

Public Finance

Public Finance
In this course we will analyze the role of government in our economy and address questions such as: When is government intervention appropriate? What is the most effective form of this intervention? How does it affect consumers and producers? Topics will include public goods, externalities, income transfer, and social insurance programs. We will study the equity and efficiency considerations in the design of tax systems, as well as the incentive effects of taxes by examining personal and corporate income taxes, consumption, and wealth taxes. (ECON 0255) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0375A-F12

CRN: 91662

Monetary Theory and Policy

Monetary Theory and Policy
This course will cover the determination of interest rates, portfolio theory, the demand for money, and the supply of money process. Emphasis will be on the difficulties faced by the Federal Reserve in its goals of achieving a steady growth in aggregate demand while doing its best to ensure that monetary disorder, such as that which characterized the Great Depression, does not reoccur. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0380A-F12

CRN: 92505

Game Theory

Game Theory I
Game theory is general in scope and has been used to provide theoretical foundations for phenomena in most of the social and behavioral sciences. Economic examples include market organization, bargaining, and the provision of public goods. Examples from other behavioral sciences include social dilemmas and population dynamics. In this course students learn the basics of what constitutes a game and how games are solved. This course is meant to be a broad introduction; students with advanced training in economics (or math) are encouraged to enroll directly in ECON 0390. (ECON 0155 and MATH 0121 required; ECON 0255 recommended) 3 hrs. sem.

ECON0390A-F12

CRN: 92506

Game Theory II

Game Theory II
This course is a more or less self-contained sequel to ECON 0380. The focus is on games with asymmetric information, and the list of topics includes games of moral hazard with hidden action or hidden knowledge, adverse selection games, mechanism design and contract theory, games of screening and signaling, and auctions. We shall also consider their application to such diverse fields as labor economics, finance, industrial organization and political economy. (ECON 0255 required; ECON 0380 recommended) 3 hrs. sem.

ECON0399A-F12

CRN: 92864

Experimental Economics

Experimental Economics
How do economic incentives influence people’s behavior? In this course students will learn how to test economic models of behavior (e.g., consumption, investment, production) using the experimental lab. Topics include: How and why do markets work? Do people act collectively to provide public goods? What are the determinants of bargaining outcomes? (ECON 0255 required; ECON 0380 or ECON 0390 recommended) 3 hrs. lect.

ECON0428A-F12

CRN: 90006

Population Growth...

Population Growth and the Global Future
This course will show how economic analysis can be used to assess the impact of rapid population growth on economic development, the environment, and economic inequality. It will analyze the rapid "graying" of the industrialized countries and their struggle to cope with international migration. It will assess the causes of urban decay in the North and the explosive growth of cities in the South. The course will consider household-level decision-making processes; the effects of changing family structures; and the need to improve the status of women. (ECON 0250 or ECON 0255) 3 hrs. sem.

ECON0429A-F12

CRN: 92507

Trade & For. Aid in Latin Amer

Trade and Foreign Aid in Latin America
This course is designed to provide an in-depth examination of a number of critical issues that currently confront policymakers in Latin America. The topics of development, regionalization and free trade, and the efficacy of foreign aid will be analyzed in the context of Latin American economic development. (ECON 0250 or ECON 0255) 3 hrs. sem.

ECON0429B-F12

CRN: 92508

Trade & For. Aid in Latin Amer

Trade and Foreign Aid in Latin America
This course is designed to provide an in-depth examination of a number of critical issues that currently confront policymakers in Latin America. The topics of development, regionalization and free trade, and the efficacy of foreign aid will be analyzed in the context of Latin American economic development. (ECON 0250 or ECON 0255) 3 hrs. sem.

ECON0444A-F12

CRN: 91980

International Trade

International Trade
We will study a variety of theories relating to trade between nations in goods, services, and assets. Effects and desirability of commercial policy, tariffs, and other controls on trade will be examined. Issues of export promotion, import substitution, strategic trade policy, foreign direct investment, role of multinationals, outsourcing, and economic integration will be analyzed in depth. We will also explore the relationship between increased capital flows, financial crises, and trade flows in the world economy. Particular attention will be paid to trade and economic development linkages in the context of the current debates on globalization. (ECON 0250 required; ECON 0340 recommended; or by approval) 3 hrs. sem.

ECON0444B-F12

CRN: 92509

International Trade

International Trade
We will study a variety of theories relating to trade between nations in goods, services, and assets. Effects and desirability of commercial policy, tariffs, and other controls on trade will be examined. Issues of export promotion, import substitution, strategic trade policy, foreign direct investment, role of multinationals, outsourcing, and economic integration will be analyzed in depth. We will also explore the relationship between increased capital flows, financial crises, and trade flows in the world economy. Particular attention will be paid to trade and economic development linkages in the context of the current debates on globalization. (ECON 0250 required; ECON 0340 recommended; or by approval) 3 hrs. sem.

ECON0445A-F12

CRN: 91981

International Finance

International Finance
An analysis of the world's financial system and the consequences for open economies of macroeconomic interdependence. Particular topics include: exchange rate determination, balance of payments adjustments, and monetary and fiscal policies in open economies. Special attention is paid to the issues and problems of the European Economic Community and European integration and debt in developing countries. (ECON 0250) 3 hrs. sem.

ECON0475A-F12

CRN: 90050

Monetary Theory/Financial Inst

Monetary Theory and Financial Institutions
This seminar provides the student with the basic knowledge and analytical tools to operate in today's money and financial markets. We start with the markets themselves, how they are structured and how prices are determined, such as interest rates and foreign exchange rates. We then study private sector institutions, including banks, securities houses, insurance companies, and fund management companies, and the challenges they face in the Age of the Internet. And we close with a study of how the Federal Reserve and other central banks determine monetary policy. (ECON 0250) 3 hrs. sem., 1 hr. lab

ECON0475Y-F12

CRN: 91262

Monetary Theory/Financial Inst
Lab

Monetary Theory and Financial Institutions
This seminar provides the student with the basic knowledge and analytical tools to operate in today's money and financial markets. We start with the markets themselves, how they are structured and how prices are determined, such as interest rates and foreign exchange rates. We then study private sector institutions, including banks, securities houses, insurance companies, and fund management companies, and the challenges they face in the Age of the Internet. And we close with a study of how the Federal Reserve and other central banks determine monetary policy. (ECON 0250) 3 hrs. sem., 1 hr. lab

ECON0475Z-F12

CRN: 90474

Monetary Theory/Financial Inst
Lab

Monetary Theory and Financial Institutions
This seminar provides the student with the basic knowledge and analytical tools to operate in today's money and financial markets. We start with the markets themselves, how they are structured and how prices are determined, such as interest rates and foreign exchange rates. We then study private sector institutions, including banks, securities houses, insurance companies, and fund management companies, and the challenges they face in the Age of the Internet. And we close with a study of how the Federal Reserve and other central banks determine monetary policy. (ECON 0250) 3 hrs. sem., 1 hr. lab

ECON0480A-F12

CRN: 92510

Labor Economics

Labor Economics
This seminar will explore the economics of labor markets from both theoretical and empirical perspectives. Topics covered include: labor force participation, wage determination, welfare and minimum wage policies, education and on-the-job training, compensating differentials, dual labor markets, inequality and discrimination, unions, immigration, employment relations, and household bargaining. (ECON 0255 required; ECON 0211 strongly recommended)

ECON0500A-F12

CRN: 90203

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500B-F12

CRN: 90762

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500C-F12

CRN: 90665

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500D-F12

CRN: 90668

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500E-F12

CRN: 90946

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500F-F12

CRN: 90947

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500G-F12

CRN: 90948

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500H-F12

CRN: 90949

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500I-F12

CRN: 90950

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500J-F12

CRN: 90951

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500K-F12

CRN: 90952

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500L-F12

CRN: 90953

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500M-F12

CRN: 90954

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500N-F12

CRN: 90955

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500O-F12

CRN: 90956

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500P-F12

CRN: 90957

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500Q-F12

CRN: 90958

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500R-F12

CRN: 91096

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500S-F12

CRN: 91097

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500T-F12

CRN: 91098

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500U-F12

CRN: 91099

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0500V-F12

CRN: 91100

Individual Special Project

Individual Special Project
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards one of the 10 courses for the major.

ECON0700A-F12

CRN: 91290

Senior Research
Senior Research Workshop

Senior Research Workshop
Prior to enrolling in ECON 0700, students must have taken a minimum of 6 economics courses at Middlebury approved to count towards the major requirements. These senior workshops will be composed of no more than eight students who will work independently on a project in a specific area for two semesters (fall/winter or winter/spring) and will meet to collectively discuss and present their research. Students who have prearranged a research topic with the professor will be given priority in admission to the seminar. Also, because of limited resources for guiding senior work, students with a single major in economics will be given priority over double majors who will do senior work in other departments. Students interested in pursuing departmental honors must take a Senior Research Workshop (ECON 0700) during their senior year. To receive departmental honors the student must receive a minimum grade of A- in the Senior Research Workshop project and have a 3.5 or higher GPA in all economics courses taken at Middlebury approved to count towards the major requirements. High Honors requires an A in the Senior Research Seminar and a 3.75 or higher economics GPA, and Highest Honors an A in the seminar and a 3.9 or higher economics GPA. (Approval required)

ECON0700B-F12

CRN: 92511

Senior Research

Senior Research Workshop
Prior to enrolling in ECON 0700, students must have taken a minimum of 6 economics courses at Middlebury approved to count towards the major requirements. These senior workshops will be composed of no more than eight students who will work independently on a project in a specific area for two semesters (fall/winter or winter/spring) and will meet to collectively discuss and present their research. Students who have prearranged a research topic with the professor will be given priority in admission to the seminar. Also, because of limited resources for guiding senior work, students with a single major in economics will be given priority over double majors who will do senior work in other departments. Students interested in pursuing departmental honors must take a Senior Research Workshop (ECON 0700) during their senior year. To receive departmental honors the student must receive a minimum grade of A- in the Senior Research Workshop project and have a 3.5 or higher GPA in all economics courses taken at Middlebury approved to count towards the major requirements. High Honors requires an A in the Senior Research Seminar and a 3.75 or higher economics GPA, and Highest Honors an A in the seminar and a 3.9 or higher economics GPA. (Approval required)