Elizabeth Napier

Professor of English and American Literatures

 
 work802.443.5044
 Spring Term: Monday and Wednesday 12:15-1:15, Thursday 4:30-5:30, and by appointment
 Hesselgrave House 222

Elizabeth Napier has been teaching in the Department of English and American Literatures at Middlebury College since 1978.   Her research and writing focus on eighteenth-century English literature, with a special emphasis on the novel, and on literary translation, with a particular interest in the writings of painter-poets.  She teaches mainly in the areas of eighteenth-century literature and the novel.

Professor Napier received her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Virginia.

Selected Publications

Books

Defoe's Major Fiction: Accounting for the Self.  University of Delaware Press, 2016.

Falling Into Matter:  Problems of Embodiment in English Fiction from Defoe to Shelley. U Toronto P, 2011.

F. T. Marinetti: Selected Poems and Related Prose. Translation with Barbara R. Studholme; selected by Luce Marinetti; with an essay by Paolo Valesio. New Haven: Yale UP, 2002.

The Failure of Gothic: Problems of Disjunction in an Eighteenth-century Literary Form. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1987.

Sounds.  Translation, with introduction, of Wassily Kandinsky's Klänge.  New Haven: Yale UP, 1981.

Selected Articles

"The Grapes of Wrath: Steinbeck's Pilgrim's Progress."  Steinbeck Review 7: 1 (2010): 51-56.

“’Raining Cats and Dogs’: Swift’s ‘A Description of a City Shower’.” Explicator 65:4 (2007): 208-11.

"Mary Collyer." British Novelists 1660- 1800, I.  Ed. Martin C. Battestin. Dictionary of Literary Biography.   Detroit: BC Research, 1985. XXXIX, 113- 116.

"Elizabeth Griffith," 247- 251.

"Elizabeth Inchbald," 274- 280.

"Harriet Lee; Sophia Lee," 301- 306.

"Matthew Gregory Lewis," 313- 323.

"Ann Radcliffe," II, 37- 46.

"Clara Reeve," II, 46- 51.

"Elizabeth Rowe," II, 409- 413.

"Sarah Scott," II, 413- 418.

"Charlotte Smith," II, 433- 440.

"Horace Walpole," II, 525- 542.

"The Problem of Boundaries in Wuthering Heights." Philological Quarterly 63 (1984): 95-107.  Rpt. in Major Literary Characters: Heathcliff.  Ed. Harold Bloom.  New York: Chelsea House, 1993.  48-50.

"Swift, Kaempfer, and Psalmanaazaar: Further Remarks on 'Trampling upon the Crucifix'." Notes and Queries 226 (l98l): 226.

"Objects and Order in Robinson Crusoe." South Atlantic Quarterly 80 (l98l): 84- 94.

"Swift's 'Trampling upon the Crucifix': A Parallel." Notes and Queries 224 (l979): 544- 548.

"Aylmer as 'Scheidekünstler': The Pattern of Union and Separation in Hawthorne's 'The Birthmark'." South Atlantic Bulletin, 4l (l976): 32-35.

"'Tremble and Reform': The Inversion of Power in Richardson's Clarissa." ELH 42 (l975): 2l4- 223.

Translations from the poetry of Valie Export.  Dimension: Contemporary German Arts and Letters 8 (l975): 82- 85.

 

 

Courses

Course List: 

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

CRWR0560 - Special Project: Writing      

Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017

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CRWR0701 - Senior Thesis:Creative Writing      

Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2016, Spring 2017

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ENAM0103 - Reading Literature      

Reading Literature
Please refer to each section for specific course descriptions. CW LIT

Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2016

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ENAM0204 - Foundations of English Lit.      

Foundations of English Literature (I) (Pre-1800)
Students will study Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and Milton's Paradise Lost, as well as other foundational works of English literature that may include Shakespeare, non-Shakespearean Elizabethan drama, the poetry of Donne, and other 16th- and 17th-century poetry. 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR LIT

Spring 2015, Fall 2015

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ENAM0208 - Literary Landscapes, 1700-1900      

English Literary Landscapes, 1700-1900 (II) (Pre-1800)
In this course we will examine literary and related works that take as their focus the natural world and man's relationship to it. We will consider transformations of taste in representations of landscape in England in the 18th and 19th centuries. Works to be discussed will include poems, gardening tracts, philosophical treatises, notebooks, letters, travel accounts, natural histories, and novels. Pope, Crabbe, Wordsworth, Tennyson, Clare, Hopkins, and Hardy will be central figures in this course. EUR LIT

Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2015

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ENAM0220 - The Early English Novel      

Castaways, Courtesans, and Criminals: The Early English Novel (II)
The novel was a young and scandalous literary genre in the 18th century. The reading public found the novel to be confusing, unpredictable, racy, morally dangerous--and of course very exciting. In this course we will examine the rise of the novel as a controversial literary genre, tracing its development from Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe and Moll Flanders in the early part of the century, through Richardson’s didactic Pamela and Clarissa and Fielding’s lively Tom Jones in mid-century, to Sterne’s wildly experimental Tristram Shandy and the more familiar world of Jane Austen at the century’s end. We will also consider the ways in which this history has shaped the fiction of today by reading a 21st century novel, to be determined by the course participants. EUR LIT

Spring 2015, Fall 2016

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ENAM0225 - Eighteenth-Century Literature      

Travails of the Self: Eighteenth-Century Literature (II)
The 'long' 18th century opens with poems of affairs of state and ends with intensely private and often anguished meditations on the self. In this course we will examine the rich range and complexity of 18th century literary concerns through a loosely chronological look at major works of poetry, drama, and fiction of the period: poems of Gay, Pope, Swift, Cowper, and Gray; Congreve's The Way of the World and Sheridan's The School for Scandal; and Fielding's Joseph Andrews and Inchbald's A Simple Story. 3 hrs. lect./disc. LIT

Fall 2012

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ENAM0229 - Neoclassic/Romantic/Victorian      

Neoclassic, Romantic, Victorian: Changes in English Poetry, 1700-1900 (II)
In this course we will examine important shifts of style and sensibility in English poetry of the neoclassic, romantic, and Victorian periods. We will consider issues of poetic genre, structure, and diction, as well as transforming notions of knowledge, nature, and the self. Major poets will include Pope, Swift, Wordsworth, Keats, Tennyson, and Hardy. 3 hrs. lect. EUR LIT

Fall 2014

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ENAM0308 - Lit of the First World War      

The Literature of the First World War
In this course we will study literature generated by observers of the Great War (1914-18) and its aftermath. We will examine the writing of war poets such as Rupert Brooke, Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen, Isaac Rosenberg, and Robert Graves, and novelists such as Ernest Hemingway (A Farewell to Arms), Erich Maria Remarque (All Quiet on the Western Front), Kazuo Ishiguro (The Remains of the Day), and Pat Barker (Regeneration), as well as personal accounts and visual art that take as their subject the Great War. We will also consider protest, trauma, grief, and memory, as well as the technical and stylistic innovations that emerged during this period. 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR LIT

Fall 2016

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ENAM0425 - Booker Prize Fiction      

Booker Prize Fiction
The Man Booker Prize for Fiction is awarded annually to a writer from the British Commonwealth or the Republic of Ireland—and, since last year, to a writer of any nationality writing in English--for the best full-length novel published in the UK. In this seminar, we will study a selection of winners since the award was established in 1968. Readings will reflect a diversity of writers, settings, and styles, such as Penelope Lively’s Moon Tiger (1987), Peter Cary's Oscar and Lucinda (1988), Kazuo Ishiguro’s The Remains of the Day (1989), Michael Ondaatje’s The English Patient (1992), J. M. Coetzee's Disgrace (1997), Arundhati Roy's The God of Small Things (1999), Yann Martel’s Life of Pi/ (2001), Richard Flanagan’s The Narrow Road to the Deep North/ (2014) and the 2015 winner, to be announced in October. Topics of research and discussion will include literary innovation, authorial reputation, the politics of prizes, publicity, and film adaptation. 3 hrs. sem. EUR LIT

Spring 2016

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ENAM0455 - Problems in Narrative      

Problems in Narrative Analysis, 1814 to 2013
In this seminar we will examine issues of genre, theme, and style that pose particularly demanding problems of analysis in the novel as it develops into the 21st century. Among works to be discussed will be Austen's Mansfield Park, Joyce's Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and the 2013 Man Booker Prize winner (to be announced in October). We will scrutinize point of view, narrative style, authorial investment in or resistance to plot and/or character, and breadth of moral and political vision. 3 hrs sem. EUR LIT

Fall 2013

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ENAM0500 - Special Project: Lit      

Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017

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ENAM0700 - Senior Thesis:Critical Writing      

Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017

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ENAM0710 - Senior Thesis: Critical Writ.      

Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking two-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the thesis workshop (ENAM 710z) in both Fall and Spring terms.

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014

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ENAM1004 - Short Dickens      

Short Dickens
“Whatever the word ‘great’ means,” wrote Chesterton, “Dickens was what it means.” In this course we will study five of the shortest of Dickens’s fifteen novels, which appeared serially between 1837 and 1870: Oliver Twist, Hard Times, A Tale of Two Cities, Great Expectations, and the unfinished Mystery of Edwin Drood. We will discuss, in addition, Dickens’s rise to fame, Victorian London, serial publication, sentimentalism, the illustrations to Dickens’s novels, as well as various commercial enterprises based on the mania for Dickens—among them the ill-fated Dickens World in Kent. EUR LIT WTR

Winter 2014

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FYSE1163 - Letter of the Law      

Letter of the Law
In this seminar we will study the representation of law and lawyers in a selection of literary works from Sophocles’s Antigone to John Grisham’s A Time to Kill. We will be concerned with issues of justice, equity, the letter of the law, law and customs, law and politics, and punishment and retribution as they manifest themselves in some of the following works: Antigone, Billy Budd, The Lottery, The Trial, In Cold Blood, and A Time to Kill. We will also view some episodes of L.A. Law. Writing will emphasize the development of a strong critical stance, precise thinking and use of language, and effective implementation of evidence in supporting an argument. CW LIT

Fall 2012

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FYSE1416 - Talking the Talk      

Talking the Talk
In this seminar we will discuss literary works that show particular interest in dialogue or that explore difficulties of communication among characters of different cultural, educational, and linguistic backgrounds, and among figures who vie for dominance within conversational and related arenas. We will consider writers’ uses of regional dialects, cant, and slang, and gender (and other) differences in spoken language. Readings will include novels by James, Conrad, Lawrence, Forster; stories by O’Connor; and a play by Pinter. Writing will emphasize the development of a critical stance, precise thinking and use of language, and effective implementation of evidence in supporting an argument. 3 hrs. sem. CW LIT

Fall 2014

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LITS0701 - Independent Reading Course      

Independent Reading Course
Intended for majors in literary studies preparing for the senior comprehensive examinations. At the conclusion of this course, students will take a one-hour oral examination (part of the senior comprehensive examination) in a specialization of their choice. (Approval Required) (Staff)

Fall 2014

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Department of English & American Literatures

Axinn Center at Starr Library
15 Old Chapel Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753