Cates Baldridge

Professor of English and American Literatures

 
 work802.443.5330
 Spring Term: Tuesday and Thursday 1:00-3:00 and by appointment
 Axinn Center at Starr Library 308

 

ARTICLES

"Voyeuristic Rebellion: Lockwood's Dream and the Reader of Wuthering Heights," Studies in the Novel, Fall, 1988.

"The Problems of Worldliness in Pendennis," Nineteenth- Century Literature., December, 1989.

"Alternatives to Bourgeois Individualism in A Tale of Two Cities," Studies in English Literature, Autumn, 1990.

"Observation and Domination in Hardy's The Woodlanders," Victorian Literature and Culture, Spring 1993.

"The Instabilities of Inheritance in Oliver Twist, Studies in the Novel, Summer, 1993.

"Agnes Grey: Brontë's Bildungsroman That Isn't," The Journal of Narrative Tchnique, Winter 1993.

"Antinomian Reviewers:  Hogg's Critique of Romantic-Era Magazine Culture in The Confessions of a Justified Sinner," Studies in the Novel, Vol. 43, No. 4 (Winter, 2011), pp. 385-405.

"The White Hotel's Scandalous Finale:  An Allegory of Reading"  The Journal of Modern Literature 37.2 (Winter, 2014)

 

BOOKS

The Dialogics of Dissent in the English Novel, University Press of New England, 1994.

Graham Greene's Fictions: The Virtues of Extremity, University of Missouri Press, 2000.

Prisoners of Prester John:  The Portuguese Mission in Ethiopia in Search of the Mythical King, 1520-1526, McFarland and Co., 2012.

 

 

Courses

Course List: 

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

CRWR0560 - Special Project: Writing      

Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017

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CRWR0701 - Senior Thesis:Creative Writing      

Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2015, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017

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CRWR0711 - Senior Thesis: Creative Writ.      

Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking two-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction. (Formerly ENAM 0711)

Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014

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ENAM0103 - Reading Literature      

Reading Literature
Please refer to each section for specific course descriptions. CW LIT

Fall 2013, Fall 2015

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ENAM0205 / CMLT0205 - Intro:Contemporary Lit. Theory      

Introduction to Contemporary Literary Theory
This course will introduce several major schools of contemporary literary theory. By reading theoretical texts in close conjunction with works of literature, we will illuminate the ways in which these theoretical stances can produce various interpretations of a given poem, novel, or play. The approaches covered will include New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Marxism and Cultural Criticism, Feminism, and Post-Structuralism. These theories will be applied to works by Shakespeare, Wordsworth, The Brontës, Conrad, Joyce, and others. The goal will be to make students critically aware of the fundamental literary, cultural, political, and moral assumptions underlying every act of interpretation they perform. 3 hrs. lect/disc. EUR LIT

Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2015, Fall 2016

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ENAM0213 - Modernist Movement      

The Modernist Moment
British Modernism is the literary movement that dominated the first half of the 20th century and whose aftershocks are still strongly felt today. By engaging with major authors of the period such as James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, and D. H. Lawrence, we will explore the aspirations and accomplishments of this revolutionary band of writers. We will then read some contemporary works in order to determine whether Modernist methods have become the default setting of 21st century literary fiction, or whether we can justly claim that we are all now thoroughly “post-modern” writers and readers. 3 hrs. lect. EUR LIT

Fall 2013

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ENAM0250 - The Romantic Revolution      

The Romantic Revolution (II)
he generation of British poets and novelists known collectively as the Romantics decisively rebelled against earlier conceptions of what literature could speak about, how it could best describe a rapidly changing world, and who was fit to be its reader. Arguably the first environmentalists, the Romantics also initiated our modern discussions of gender, class, race, and nationalism. To encounter the Romantics is to witness intellectual courage taking up arms against habit, prejudice, and tyranny. We will trace their genius and daring (and follow their personal attachments for, and rivalries with, each other) through the poetry of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats, and the novels of Mary Shelley and Emily Brönte. 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR LIT

Fall 2012, Spring 2016

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ENAM0285 / CMLT0285 - Magical Realism(s)      

Magical Realism(s)
Novels that juxtapose the marvelous with the everyday have shadowed (and mocked) mainstream realism for the better part of two centuries, and have proliferated in recent years to the point where they may constitute the predominant genre of our globalized culture. Why should such strange mélanges of the quotidian and the supernatural strike so many authors as the perfect vehicle to express 20th and 21st century anxieties and possibilities? We will explore examples of these boundary-defying fictions across several decades and various national literatures. Authors to be studied will include Woolf, Kafka, Calvino, Morrison, Pynchon, Rushdie, and Garcia-Marquez. CMP LIT

Spring 2014, Spring 2016

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ENAM0402 - The Modernist Moment      

The Modernist Moment
High Modernism can be defined as the unlikely attempt to faithfully depict the fragmentation and randomness of modernity while remaining committed to the notion that art can construct a vision of coherence and beauty that might explain, reconcile, and even heal. Does this enterprise result in a dramatic break with traditional realism, or merely refine and interiorize it? Does its fine-grained psychology mark a retreat from engagement with political issues, or mount a daring challenge to the powers that be? We will press Conrad, Joyce, Woolf, Faulkner, T. S, Eliot, and others for answers to these defining questions. EUR LIT

Fall 2013

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ENAM0443 - Literature's Body      

Writing in Blood: Literature’s Body
To what extent is our condition defined and our destiny determined by the physical bodies that envelop us? In this seminar we will accompany poets, playwrights, and novelists as they investigate the ecstasies, agonies, ambiguities, and transformations that flesh imposes upon our daily lives. Simultaneously, we will consider their various attempts to transcend our bodily limitations, whether by means of religion, imagination, sexuality, or pharmaceuticals. Along the way, we will collaborate with our writers as they scrutinize the human form as a biological fact, social segregator, philosophical conundrum, and undiscovered country. Authors will include Dickinson, Yeats, Shakespeare, Beckett, Ondaatje, and Coetzee. 3 hrs. sem. EUR LIT

Spring 2013

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ENAM0500 - Special Project: Lit      

Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017

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ENAM0700 - Senior Thesis:Critical Writing      

Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2015, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017

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ENAM0710 - Senior Thesis: Critical Writ.      

Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking two-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the thesis workshop (ENAM 710z) in both Fall and Spring terms.

Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014

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ENAM1001 - Fictional Fictions      

Fictional Fictions
In this course we will engage with novels whose primary focus is the novel itself—how the genre is imagined, structured, written, sold, read, celebrated, and denounced. Our chosen meta-fictions will variously focus on the psychology of artistic production, on the philosophical issues surrounding the telling of “true lies,” on the social function of novels in our culture, and on what is at stake in the supposedly private act of reading. Our texts will include works such as Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, McEwan’s Atonement, Graham Greene’s The End of the Affair, Cunningham’s The Hours, and DeLillo’s Mao II. This course counts as an ENAM elective. LIT WTR

Winter 2014

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FYSE1366 - Literature's Seven Deadly Sins      

Literature's Seven Deadly Sins
Because sin is the indispensable engine of most stories worth telling, this seminar will introduce students to the critical analysis of poetry, drama, and fiction through an encounter with literary representations of each of the Seven Deadly Sins. While our main business will be to investigate how literature invites us to understand—and perhaps even love—the sinner, we will also take time to consider both the traditional (religious, moral, philosophical) and modern (psychological, political) understanding of these moral lapses, and to speculate about why different observers perceive one or the other of them as being especially heinous or, conversely and perversely, a virtue in disguise. Readings will include Dickinson, Yeats, Shakespeare, Pinter, Coetzee, and Dickens. CW LIT

Fall 2012

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FYSE1477 - FYSE 1477      

Anti-Heroes
How do works of literature persuade us to undertake the difficult work of opening our closed minds, softening our hard hearts, and questioning our deepest unexamined assumptions? Sometimes by presenting us with protagonists whose flaws seem to far outnumber their virtues, and who resemble people we have been taught to avoid and disdain in our actual lives. Keeping our eyes open as we begin to empathize with various monsters, failures, and lunatics, we will engage fundamental questions concerning literature’s persuasive techniques, psychological effects, and social responsibilities. Our syllabus will include novels, poems, and plays from the Elizabethan era to the present day. 3 hrs. sem. CW LIT

Fall 2016

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Department of English & American Literatures

Axinn Center at Starr Library
15 Old Chapel Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753