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Below are Fall, 2018 courses that faculty members or departments would like to bring to the attention of First Year Seminar advisors.  ADVISORS: PLEASE CHECK OR REFRESH THIS PAGE OFTEN, AS THE LISTINGS CHANGE CONTINUALLY.

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ART 200 - Animation: Analog Drawings Set to Sound and Motion

Instructor: Wallner

Class Times: 

Lecture--MW 1:30-4:15

CRN: 91784

Animated drawings trying to capture movement date back to the earliest drawings of mankind, but only in the 19th century did the “moving image” become possible and dramatically change our view of the world. In this course we will explore the history of animation, from ancient Egyptian murals to DaVinci, and from Duchamp to Pixar, and we will watch contemporary examples of high- and low-brow animations. After an introduction of basic drawing techniques - with a focus on drawing life models - we will set out to create individual drawing animations. In these animations all kinds of approaches are valid, and students will work as independently as possible. Although there are no prerequisites for this course, visual art experience and foundation drawing skills are recommended. 3 hrs. lect./lab ART

 

This class counts as a prerequisite for all other upper level classes in Studio Art!   Students must take a foundation level drawing course if they want to take upper level courses in Studio Art. You may contact the professor directly if you have questions regarding the content of this class.

This year only, students will take part in a week-long drawing marathon with visiting artist, Dasha Shishkin and also collaborate with an excellent musician from Vienna, Raumschiff Engelmayr.

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ENAM 0270 Postcolonial Literature from South Asia, Africa and the Caribbean

Instructor: Siddiqi

Class Times:

Lecture: MW 12:15-1:30

No discussion sections, labs, or screenings

CRN: 92631

In the last decades, writers from postcolonial South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean have come into their own, winning international prizes and garnering attention because of the literary quality of their work as well as their nuanced engagement with important issues of our age--issues such as imperialism, orientalism, colonial rule, political resistance, subaltern studies, nationalism, economic development, gender and sexuality, immigration, diaspora, and globalization. We will discuss a range of works by writers such as Chinua Achebe, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, J. M. Coetzee, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Assia Djebar, Frantz Fanon, Hanif Kureishi, Nadine Gordimer, C.L.R. James, Jamaica Kincaid, George Lamming, Ngugi Wa Thiong'o, Rohinton Mistry, Arundhati Roy, Salman Rushdie, Edward Said, Zadie Smith, and Wole Soyinka. Texts will vary from semester to semester. 3 hrs. lect/disc. CMP, LIT, SOA 

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HARC 248 Gold, Sex, and Death at the Museum

Instructor: Laursen

Class Times:

Lecture--TR 9:30-10:45

No discussion sections, labs, or screenings

CRN: 922206

Most visitors to museums notice the architecture, carefully chosen collections, and meticulously curated special exhibitions. However, behind this façade is a busy network of museum professionals coordinating every aspect of the institution’s life. Through readings and guest lectures, we will explore how directors, curators, and staff navigate the challenges facing the modern museum, such as establishing acquisitions policies in an increasingly uncertain art market, defining ethical standards for conservation, and addressing audiences with ever-changing needs. Speakers such as a curator, art critic, and conservator will contribute to our discussion, and attendance at a series of public talks is required.  AMR

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HARC 355 Digital Methodologies for Art Historians: Ancient Chinese Gold

Instructor: Laursen

Class Times: 

Seminar--M 1:30-4:15

No discussion sections, screenings, or labs

CRN: 92465

In this seminar we will learn new technologies and study old gold in preparation for an upcoming exhibition of ancient Chinese gold at the Middlebury Museum of Art. Gold objects produced in China during the nearly one thousand years from second century BCE to the mid-eighth century CE bear witness to China’s military expansion and the interconnectedness of the Eurasian continent at the height of the Silk Road. The distribution of these luxury items across the ancient world is mirrored in the modern period by the global trade in Chinese antiquities in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, which brought gold ornaments, horse trappings, and vessels into North American Museum collections. We will explore these captivating objects through readings about Chinese archaeology, goldsmithing, and the history of collecting, while at the same time learning about the latest digital tools for data management, analysis, mapping, and imaging used by curators and art historians. No prior experience with Asian art necessary. ART, NOA

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HEBM 0201 Intermediate Modern Hebrew I 

Instructor: Aloni

Class Times: MW 8:00-8:50, TR 8:00-9:15

CRN: 91023

This course is a continuation of HEBM 0103. Using authentic audio and visual materials, we will place emphasis on developing the skills required for intermediate-level written and communicative competence. In addition, students will gain a deeper understanding of the forms and style of Classical Hebrew, both of which are necessary for formal composition, interaction, and reading comprehension in Modern Hebrew. (HEBM 0103 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect/disc LNG

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HEBM 254 Rites and Rituals: Israel and its Neighbors

Instructor: Gazit

Class Times: MW 12:15-1:30

No discussion sections, labs, or screenings

CRN: 92502

In this course we will present and analyze a wide range of rites, festivities, ceremonies, and rituals that take place in Israeli society. By doing so we will shed light on core values, common and less prevalent norms, and social relations, as are represented, reproduced, and contested in ritualistic activities, between ethnic groups, people holding diverse beliefs, as well as those in power and those who may defy them. Based primarily on sociological and anthropological literature, the discussions will address the characteristics of various rituals, the manners in which rituals have been created, modified, and abandoned over the years, and the distinct cultural meanings they may hold for different groups and individuals. We will use theoretical literature, empirical case studies, and an abundance of cultural artifacts. In order to depict a broad picture, comparisons will be drawn between Israel and in its neighbors, in addition to an emphasis on past and present-day Jewish communities abroad. We will address similarities and differences in the ways rituals are performed in geographically proximate yet culturally distinct countries, and in the heterogeneous Israeli society.  3 hrs. lect. CMP, SOC

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HEBM 263/CMLT 0263 Representation in Modern Hebrew Literature: Nation and Identities

Instructor: Aloni

Class Times:

Lecture--TR 3:00-4:15

No discussion sections, labs, or screenings

CRN: 92516

Modern Hebrew literature, in its relatively short history, presents exceptional richness. In this course we will explore the theme of nation and identity in modern Hebrew literature: we will visit the personal lyricism of Bialik and his circle, the encyclopedic prose of Agnon, the troubled stream of consciousness of Gnessin, the stark realism of Brenner, the symbolism of Alterman, and the deliberately thin post-modern prose of Keret. We will meet modern Hebrew literature’s remarkable achievements as well as its points of crisis. We will also explore its deep historical roots which make modern Hebrew literature so unique. All readings in the course will be in English. 3 hrs. lect./disc CMP, LIT, MDE

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HEBM 0301 Advanced Intermediate Hebrew

Instructor: Aloni 

Class Times: MW 11:15-12:05, TR 11:00-12:15

CRN: 92515

This course will reinforce the acquired skills of speaking, listening comprehension,reading, and writing at the intermediate to mid/high level. We will focus primarily on contemporary cultural aspects, conversational Hebrew, reading of selections from Modern Literature: prose and poetry, skits, and newspaper articles. 3 hrs. lect./disc. LNG, MDE

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HIST 326 Histories of U.S. Radicalism, 1917-2017

Instructor: Povitz 

Class Times:

Lecture--W 7:30-10:25  

No discussion sections, labs, or screenings

CRN: 92636

From communism to libertarianism, Black Nationalism to radical feminism, this seminar examines the many facets of radical social movements in the United States during the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. In particular, we will draw on individual and collective biographies of radicals to explore chronological linkages and social connections between apparently discrete political tendencies. We will also consider the political, social, cultural, and economic contexts that catalyzed these movements, the various forms of backlash and repression they faced, and the changing political uses to which these historical movements have been put.  AMR, HIS, SOC

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HIST/GSFS 373 History of American Women, 1869-1999 

Instructor: Povitz

Class Times:

Lecture--TR 1:30-2:45 

No discussion sections, labs, or screenings

CRN: 92312

This course will examine women's social, political, cultural, and economic position in American society from 1869 through the late 20th century. We will explore the shifting ideological basis for gender roles, as well as the effects of race, class, ethnicity, and region on women's lives. Topics covered will include: women's political identity, women's work, sexuality, access to education, the limits of "sisterhood" across racial and economic boundaries, and the opportunities women used to expand their sphere of influence. AMR, CMP, HIS

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INTD 217 Intro to Finance

Instructor: van Gansbeke

Class Times:

Lecture--TR 8:00-9:15 AM

Lab--M 7:30-10:25 PM

In this introductory survey course we will cover the role of finance in society, the basic workings of the financial system, how funds are allocated within the economy, and how institutions raise money.  We will cover a range of topics, including: interest rates and the time value of money; uncertainty and the trade-off between risk and return; security market efficiency; stocks, bonds and optimal capital structure; financing decisions and capital budgeting; sovereign risk; foreign currencies; derivatives markets; and concerns about the role of finance in society.  The course will include discussions of current news events in global markets.  e hrs. lect. and 1 hr. lab. recommended INTD 116.  Students who have not take INTD 116 will be required to demonstrate basic proficiency in accounting.

Please contact Dave Colander or Prof. van Gansbeke if you are uncertain whether you qualify to take this course.

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RELI 0160 Jewish Traditions

Instructor: Schine

Class Times:

Lecture--TR 1:30-2:45

No discussion sections, labs, or screenings

CRN: 92420

“Traditions” are not static, but a constant interplay between continuity and creativity. What do classical Jewish texts (Bible, Rabbinic literature) tell us about Judaism’s origins? How have the core concepts and practices of Judaism morphed into a cluster of traditions that has endured over two millennia? With these questions in mind, we will study central ideas in Jewish thought, rituals, and their transformations, culminating in individual projects involving the investigation a contemporary movement, congregation or trend in contemporary Jewish life, e.g. Reform, Reconstructionism, mystical (neo-Kabbalistic) revivals, or “secular” Judaism. 3 hrs. lect./disc. HIS, PHL

Please note: The first class meeting will be on Thurs. 9/13.

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SOAN 344--Anthropology of Political Polarization

Instructor: Stoll

Class Times:

Lecture--MW 12:15-1:30

No discussion sections, labs, or screenings 

CRN: 92466

This course will apply the anthropology of evolution, religion and politics to analyze the operative mechanisms of political polarization.  Our framework will include natural selection for accountability, moralism and factionalism; how social groups define themselves through mimesis, othering and scapegoating; how scapegoating justifies aggression; how sacrifice and other forms of ritualizing victimhood generate sanctity, sacrilege and outrage; and how religious and political loyalty tests enforce social boundaries. Our case studies will include how antagonistic groups in contemporary U.S. society formulate conspiracy theories to justify mutual rejection (3 hrs. lect./disc.) AMR, SOC.

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THEA 106 Voices from Post Colonial World

Instructor: Medeiros

Class Times:

Lect. TR 1:30-2:45

No discussion sections, labs, or screenings

CRN: 92216

In this course we will study seminal 20th century plays from countries that do not belong to the so-called “dominant west.” While our primary focus will be close analysis of dramatic texts, we will occasionally read other kinds of writing (critical work, historical essays, primary documents) with a view to gaining insight into the historical and cultural context underlying each work. Our ultimate goal is to understand the plays as three-dimensional artistic interventions into the fabric of diverse societies. The reading list will include playwrights such as Aimé Césiare, Athol Fugard, Griselda Gambaro, David Henry Hwang, William Shakespeare and Derek Walcott. All readings in English. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, ART, LIT

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THEA 111 Scenic Design I: Beginning

Instructor: Evancho

Class Times:

Lecture--TR 11-12:15

Exploration and development of basic set design skills for theatre and dance. Class projects will introduce the student to sketching, sculpting, script analysis, and presentation skills. The design projects will challenge the student's imagination and creativity through historical and current theatrical literature, the study of artistic movements in theatre, concept development, and research. In addition, students will work on productions in order to understand better how theory relates to practice. 25 hours of production lab work will be assigned in class. 3 hrs. lect. ART

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THEA 119A Fall Production Studio: Design

Instructor: Evancho

Class Times: Lecture--M 1:30-4:15

CRN 90392

In preparing a fully produced theatrical production for the stage, students will participate in and be exposed to professional production practices in all areas of theatrical design, including sets, costumes, props, lights, and sound. Students will be involved in planning, building, painting, constructing, and running and striking of shows. More advanced students may speak to the professors about taking on special projects, but those with little or no experience backstage are very much encouraged to participate. 8 hrs. lab ART

NOTE:  This section pertains to sets, props, and tech.  See section B for costumes.

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THEA 119B Fall Production Studio: Design

Instructor: Ryer

Class Times--Lecture M 1:30-4:15

CRN: 91744

In preparing a fully produced theatrical production for the stage, students will participate in and be exposed to professional production practices in all areas of theatrical design, including sets, costumes, props, lights, and sound. Students will be involved in planning, building, painting, constructing, and running and striking of shows. More advanced students may speak to the professors about taking on special projects, but those with little or no experience backstage are very much encouraged to participate. 8 hrs. lab ART

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