Middlebury

 

Gensler Symposium 2014

Below is information regarding this year’s Gensler Symposium: This conference explores how institutions embedded in patriarchy and racial hierarchies- like marriage, the military and science—are not necessarily a path to freedom, but a kind of sexual straitjacket.

The 2014 Gensler Family Symposium on Feminism in A Global Context: Sexual Straightjackets & Queer Escapes

 April 14, Crossroads Café, 7 p.m.

“MiddQUEER.”
Student-led discussion about sexual desire, sexual/gender identity and sexuality at Middlebury.
Sponsored by the Gensler Family Fund, the Program in Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies, Queer Studies House, and Queers and Allies.

April 15, 4:30 p.m., Robert A. Jones ’59 Conference Room
“I am NOT that Hungry: Creative Resistance, Black Queers, and Family.”
Lecture by Nikki Young, Assistant Professor of Women’s & Gender Studies & Religion, Bucknell University.  Capitalism, as an economic system, creates and maintains capitalist family values which operate through private/nuclear ownership and dominion, (singular) male leadership, inherent inequality within relationships, and the moral subjugation of dependents. This value system, in concert with the oppressive social constructions of race, gender, and sexuality, works to deprive black queers of a recognizable moral subjectivity. Through creative resistance, many black queers disrupt the disciplinary power within the capitalist family and imagine new relational possibilities.
Sponsored by the Gensler Family Fund, the Program in Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies, the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity, and the American Studies Spiegel Family Fund.

April 16, 9:00-10:00 p.m., Dana Auditorium
“Sister Outsider.”
In their poetry, Denice Frohman and Dominique Christina of Sister Outsider explored the legacy of the Civil Rights Movement and the in-between-ness in all of us. Student poets opened this event.
Sponsored by the Innovation and Collaboration Fund, the Office of the Dean of the College, the Program in Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies, Chellis House, the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity, Wonnacott Commons, Ross Commons, and the Department of English and American Literatures.

April 17, 4:30-6 p.m., Robert A. Jones '59 Conference Room
“The Tolerance Trap: How God, Genes and Good Intentions Are Sabotaging Gay Equality.”
Lecture by Suzanna Walters, Director of Women & Gender Studies and Professor of Sociology, Northeastern University.  In her talk, Professor Walters challenged received wisdom about gay identities and gay rights, arguing that we are not “almost there,” but on the contrary have settled for a watered-down goal of tolerance and acceptance rather than a robust claim to full civil rights. Drawing on a vast array of sources both popular and more scholarly, Professor Walters demonstrated how the low bar of tolerance demeans rather than ennobles both gays and straights alike. 

Sponsored by the Gensler Family Fund, the Program in Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies, the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity,and the American Studies Spiegel Family Fund.

April 17, 7 p.m., Dance Theater, Mahaney Center for the Arts
“Guerrilla Girls: Art in Action.”
Guerrilla Girl Frida Kahlo speaks about the exhibition, Guerrilla Girls: Art in Action.
Sponsored by the Museum of Art, Student Friends of the Art Museum, the Program in Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies, the Department of History of Art and Architecture,the Director of the Arts, and Academic Affairs.

April 18, 12:15 p.m., Robert A. Jones '59 Conference Room
“What’s in a Name? Identity, Marriage and Family Law in Japan.” 
Lecture by Linda White, Assistant Professor of Japanese Studies.
This  was part of the International and Global Studies Colloquium.