Sections

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HEBM0103A-S16

CRN: 21053

Intro Modern Hebrew III
Introductory Modern Hebrew III
This course is a continuation of Modern Hebrew 0102 which will be offered during winter term. Students will further develop their skills in written and oral communication, and will expand their knowledge of the cultures of modern Israel through both audio and visual media. (HEBM 0102 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect.

HEBM0202A-S16

CRN: 22488

Intermediate Modern Hebrew II
Intermediate Modern Hebrew II
This is the fifth in the sequence of Modern Hebrew courses that focus on the acquisition of reading, listening, writing, and speaking skills. This course will further increase the students' fluency in spoken Hebrew, as well as their facility in reading authentic texts dealing with both secular and religious Jewish cultures, the literature of modern-day Israel, Israeli history, and current events. By the end of the semester, students should attain the level of educated, non-native speakers of Modern Hebrew, in terms of knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, composition, and communicative competence. (HEBM 0201 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect/disc.

HEBM0236A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0236A-S16 HEBM0236B-S16 GSFS0236B-S16

CRN: 21881

Israel from the Margins
Israel from the Margins: Culture and Politics
How does Israeli culture negotiate the diversity of Israeli society? How does it represent the internal tensions complicating this society? And how do marginal subjects claim their place in Israeli culture? In this course we will explore the literary and cinematic production of Israeli women, LGBT people, Mizrahim, and Palestinians. Course materials (in translation) will range from the provocative poetry of Yona Volach, to the work of Palestinian Hebrew authors Anton Shammas and Sayed Kashua, and Mizrahi authors Ronit Matalon, Amira Hess, and Albert Swissa. We will also watch several Israeli and Palestinian films that foreground question of nationality, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. 3 hrs lect./disc.

HEBM0236B-S16

Cross-Listed As:
HEBM0236A-S16 GSFS0236A-S16 GSFS0236B-S16

CRN: 22491

Israel from the Margins
Israel from the Margins: Culture and Politics
How does Israeli culture negotiate the diversity of Israeli society? How does it represent the internal tensions complicating this society? And how do marginal subjects claim their place in Israeli culture? In this course we will explore the literary and cinematic production of Israeli women, LGBT people, Mizrahim, and Palestinians. Course materials (in translation) will range from the provocative poetry of Yona Volach, to the work of Palestinian Hebrew authors Anton Shammas and Sayed Kashua, and Mizrahi authors Ronit Matalon, Amira Hess, and Albert Swissa. We will also watch several Israeli and Palestinian films that foreground question of nationality, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. 3 hrs lect./disc.

HEBM0253A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0253A-S16 HEBM0253B-S16 SOAN0253B-S16

CRN: 22397

Anthro of Israeli Food
Hummus, Chips and Salad: The Anthropology of Israeli Food
What is Israeli Food? How do Israelis eat? And what can we learn from these culinary practices about "Israeliness"? In this course we will explore nationalism, ethnicity, religion, gender and class in Israel from the unusual and intimate culinary perspective. While reviewing the theoretical literature on the social and cultural study of food, we will follow the history of dishes such as hummus and falafel, discuss the cultural meanings of religious dietary laws and learn about unique Israeli foodways such as its Independence Day BBQ. We will also deal with the strained culinary relations between Israelis and Palestinians and between Jews and Arabs. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HEBM0253B-S16

Cross-Listed As:
HEBM0253A-S16 SOAN0253A-S16 SOAN0253B-S16

CRN: 22489

Anthro of Israeli Food
Hummus, Chips and Salad: The Anthropology of Israeli Food
What is Israeli Food? How do Israelis eat? And what can we learn from these culinary practices about "Israeliness"? In this course we will explore nationalism, ethnicity, religion, gender and class in Israel from the unusual and intimate culinary perspective. While reviewing the theoretical literature on the social and cultural study of food, we will follow the history of dishes such as hummus and falafel, discuss the cultural meanings of religious dietary laws and learn about unique Israeli foodways such as its Independence Day BBQ. We will also deal with the strained culinary relations between Israelis and Palestinians and between Jews and Arabs. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HEBM0311A-S16

CRN: 22433

Hebrew: Ideology and Politics
Modern Hebrew: Ideology, Politics, and the Miracle of Revival
The focus of this course is to introduce students to the history of Hebrew as a modern language. This will be achieved by reading academic and literary texts and examining other media, such as films and plays. We will focus on the revival of the language, paying close attention to the centrality of language ideology in Israeli society and culture. The conflicting historical narratives of the revival period play a role in Israel's political life up to this day, almost 150 years after the revival of spoken Hebrew. We will examine conflicting interpretations of the historical facts: Was the revival an unparalleled miracle? A unique case of diglossia elimination? Or a natural process of creolization? (HEBM 0301 or equivalent)

HEBM0500A-S16

CRN: 21081

Independent Project
Independent Project
(Approval Required)

HEBM0500B-S16

CRN: 21082

Independent Project
Independent Project
(Approval Required)

JWST0264A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0264A-S16

CRN: 22390

Jewish-Christian Interactions
Please register via RELI 0264A
Conflict and Identity: Jewish-Christian Interactions
“Urging a Jew to convert to Christianity is like advising a person to move upstairs while demolishing the ground floor.” This quip by Moses Mendelssohn epitomizes Christianity’s conflicted attitude to its Jewish origin, affirming it while rejecting it. Yet the relationship is not symmetrical, for the very reason that Judaism precedes Christianity. In this course we will examine the troubled history of the relationship between Christians and Jews from antiquity to the present. Readings include Church Fathers, rabbinic texts, medieval polemics, law codes regulating Jewish-Christian interactions (particularly governing food and table fellowship) and modern interfaith dialogue. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

JWST0280A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0280A-S16

CRN: 22544

Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
Please register via RELI 0280A
Studies in Hebrew Bible/Old Testament WT
Studies in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament is an introductory course that focuses on a major religious text in the Western tradition. We will closely read diverse selections from the Pentateuch, the Prophets, and the Writings in English translation; no familiarity with the Bible or background is presumed. Special attention will be paid to matters of genre and methods of modern biblical scholarship, as well as Jewish and Christian traditions of interpretation. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

Program in Jewish Studies

Munroe Hall 
427 College St.
Middlebury College

MiddleburyVT 05753