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PHIL0151A-F12

CRN: 91168

Intro Phil: Mortal Question

Introduction to Philosophy: Mortal Questions
This course is an issue-based introduction to core philosophical questions such as the following: What is the nature of reality, and can we ever know it? What is the relation between mind and body, and could computers ever think? What is the nature of the self? Do humans have free will? Is there such a thing as an objective right and wrong? Can we say God exists in the face of all the evil in the world? Readings will be drawn from both traditional philosophers (e.g., Descartes, Hume, Locke, Russell) and contemporary reflections on the issues (e.g., Nagel, Searle, Williams). Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0150. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0151Y-F12

CRN: 92876

Intro Phil: Mortal Question
Discussion

Introduction to Philosophy: Mortal Questions
This course is an issue-based introduction to core philosophical questions such as the following: What is the nature of reality, and can we ever know it? What is the relation between mind and body, and could computers ever think? What is the nature of the self? Do humans have free will? Is there such a thing as an objective right and wrong? Can we say God exists in the face of all the evil in the world? Readings will be drawn from both traditional philosophers (e.g., Descartes, Hume, Locke, Russell) and contemporary reflections on the issues (e.g., Nagel, Searle, Williams). Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0150. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0151Z-F12

CRN: 92877

Intro Phil: Mortal Question
Discussion

Introduction to Philosophy: Mortal Questions
This course is an issue-based introduction to core philosophical questions such as the following: What is the nature of reality, and can we ever know it? What is the relation between mind and body, and could computers ever think? What is the nature of the self? Do humans have free will? Is there such a thing as an objective right and wrong? Can we say God exists in the face of all the evil in the world? Readings will be drawn from both traditional philosophers (e.g., Descartes, Hume, Locke, Russell) and contemporary reflections on the issues (e.g., Nagel, Searle, Williams). Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0150. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180A-F12

CRN: 91641

Introduction to Modern Logic

Introduction to Modern Logic
Logic is concerned with good reasoning; as such, it stands at the core of the liberal arts. In this course, we will develop our reasoning skills by identifying, analyzing, and criticizing arguments found in philosophical, legal, and other texts, and also by formulating our own arguments. We will then use the formal techniques of modern propositional and predicate logic to codify and regiment various reasoning strategies. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180X-F12

CRN: 91642

Introduction to Modern Logic
Discussion

Introduction to Modern Logic
Logic is concerned with good reasoning; as such, it stands at the core of the liberal arts. In this course, we will develop our reasoning skills by identifying, analyzing, and criticizing arguments found in philosophical, legal, and other texts, and also by formulating our own arguments. We will then use the formal techniques of modern propositional and predicate logic to codify and regiment various reasoning strategies. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180Y-F12

CRN: 91643

Introduction to Modern Logic
Discussion

Introduction to Modern Logic
Logic is concerned with good reasoning; as such, it stands at the core of the liberal arts. In this course, we will develop our reasoning skills by identifying, analyzing, and criticizing arguments found in philosophical, legal, and other texts, and also by formulating our own arguments. We will then use the formal techniques of modern propositional and predicate logic to codify and regiment various reasoning strategies. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180Z-F12

CRN: 91644

Introduction to Modern Logic
Discussion

Introduction to Modern Logic
Logic is concerned with good reasoning; as such, it stands at the core of the liberal arts. In this course, we will develop our reasoning skills by identifying, analyzing, and criticizing arguments found in philosophical, legal, and other texts, and also by formulating our own arguments. We will then use the formal techniques of modern propositional and predicate logic to codify and regiment various reasoning strategies. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0201A-F12

CRN: 91334

Ancient Greek Philosophy

Ancient Greek Philosophy
This class introduces students to the range and power of Greek thought, which initiated the Western philosophical tradition. We will begin by exploring the origins of philosophy as found in myth (primarily Hesiod) and in the highly original speculation of the Pre-Socratic thinkers (such as Heraclitus and Parmenides). We will then focus on Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, examining their transformations of these earlier traditions and their own divergent approaches to ethics and education. We will also consider the influences of Greek philosophy on later thought. 3 hrs. lect.

PHIL0206A-F12

CRN: 90057

Contemporary Moral Issues

Contemporary Moral Issues
We will examine a selection of pressing moral problems of our day, seeking to understand the substance of the issues and learning how moral arguments work. We will focus on developing our analytical skills, which we can then use to present and criticize arguments on difficult moral issues. Selected topics may include world poverty, animal rights, abortion, euthanasia, human rights, just and unjust wars, capital punishment, and racial and gender issues. You will be encouraged to question your own beliefs on these issues, and in the process to explore the limit and extent to which ethical theory can play a role in everyday ethical decision making. 2 hrs.lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0206X-F12

CRN: 90696

Contemporary Moral Issues
Discussion

Contemporary Moral Issues
We will examine a selection of pressing moral problems of our day, seeking to understand the substance of the issues and learning how moral arguments work. We will focus on developing our analytical skills, which we can then use to present and criticize arguments on difficult moral issues. Selected topics may include world poverty, animal rights, abortion, euthanasia, human rights, just and unjust wars, capital punishment, and racial and gender issues. You will be encouraged to question your own beliefs on these issues, and in the process to explore the limit and extent to which ethical theory can play a role in everyday ethical decision making. 2 hrs.lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0206Y-F12

CRN: 90697

Contemporary Moral Issues
Discussion

Contemporary Moral Issues
We will examine a selection of pressing moral problems of our day, seeking to understand the substance of the issues and learning how moral arguments work. We will focus on developing our analytical skills, which we can then use to present and criticize arguments on difficult moral issues. Selected topics may include world poverty, animal rights, abortion, euthanasia, human rights, just and unjust wars, capital punishment, and racial and gender issues. You will be encouraged to question your own beliefs on these issues, and in the process to explore the limit and extent to which ethical theory can play a role in everyday ethical decision making. 2 hrs.lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0206Z-F12

CRN: 90698

Contemporary Moral Issues
Discussion

Contemporary Moral Issues
We will examine a selection of pressing moral problems of our day, seeking to understand the substance of the issues and learning how moral arguments work. We will focus on developing our analytical skills, which we can then use to present and criticize arguments on difficult moral issues. Selected topics may include world poverty, animal rights, abortion, euthanasia, human rights, just and unjust wars, capital punishment, and racial and gender issues. You will be encouraged to question your own beliefs on these issues, and in the process to explore the limit and extent to which ethical theory can play a role in everyday ethical decision making. 2 hrs.lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0210A-F12

CRN: 92500

Contemporary Ethical Theory

Contemporary Ethical Theory
In this course, we will explore some of the major texts on moral and political philosophy of the past 40 years. We will begin with John Rawls's A Theory of Justice, which attempts to develop a substantive theory of justice, and continue to Robert Nozick's libertarian critique of Rawls in Anarchy, State, and Utopia. Finally, we will study a series of works that consider whether substantive moral and political theory is still possible: Bernard Williams's Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy, Alasdair MacIntyre's After Virtue, and Richard Rorty's Contingency, Irony and Solidarity. (Previous PHIL course or PSCI 0101 recommended, but not required.) 3 hrs. lect.

PHIL0214A-F12

CRN: 91646

Science and Society

Science and Society
Scientific theories are not developed in a vacuum. Social circumstances influence the practice of science, and science, in turn, influences how we organize ourselves as a society. This course will investigate both directions of the relationship between science and society. We will ask such questions as: how do the values of society drive scientific research? What do we mean when we claim that science is 'objective' and what do we expect of an objective science? Can there be 'good' politically-motivated science, or does this conflict with the norms of 'good' science? How important is science as a way of bettering society? Do scientists bear an extra burden of responsibility when they generate scientific results of particular social significance (such as the development of the atomic bomb, or the development of techniques of cloning)? We will examine particular cases of socially significant scientific research, and we will consider larger philosophical questions concerning the status of science, given its interconnections with society. 3 hrs. lect.

PHIL0232A-F12

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0232A-F12

CRN: 92501

Philosophy of Religion

Philosophy of Religion
In the first part of this course we will focus on philosophical reflections on the existence of God, the relation between religion and morality, the existence of evil, arguments for and against religious belief, and religious experience. We will read texts by Pascal, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, William James, and Freud. In the second part we will focus on the place of religion in society, considering what it means to live in a secular society, the relation between secularism and modernity, and the resulting modern forms of religious experience and practice. 3 hrs. lect.

PHIL0237A-F12

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0237A-F12

CRN: 91697

Chinese Philosophy
Please register via HIST 0237A

Chinese Philosophy
A survey of the dominant philosophies of China, beginning with the establishment of the earliest intellectual orientations, moving to the emergence of the competing schools of the fifth century B.C., and concluding with the modern adoption and adaptation of Marxist thought. Early native alternatives to Confucian philosophy (such as Mohism, Daoism, and Legalism) and later foreign ones (such as Buddhism and Marxism) will be stressed. We will scrutinize individual thinkers with reference to their philosophical contributions and assess the implications of their ideas with reference to their historical contexts and comparative significance. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

PHIL0418A-F12

CRN: 92502

Nietzsche & Greek Thought

Nietzsche and Greek Thought: Tragedy and Philosophy
This seminar explores the profound influence Greek thought wielded upon Nietzsche. We will focus on Nietzsche's understanding of the complex relation between tragedy and philosophy: Greek tragedy is born out of the spirit of music and the twin deities of Apollo and Dionysus; it dies under attack from Socratic rationalism; but it reemerges when philosophy reaches its limits and yields to a tragic insight, as exemplified by the "music-making Socrates." We will ask how this artistic Socrates relates to Nietzsche's own tragic hero, Zarathustra, and why tragedy affirms life and overcomes pessimism. Readings selected from Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, and Nietzsche. 3 hrs. sem.

PHIL0500A-F12

CRN: 90218

Resrch In Philosophy

Supervised independent research in philosophy. Admission by approval.

PHIL0500B-F12

CRN: 90220

Resrch In Philosophy

Supervised independent research in philosophy. Admission by approval.

PHIL0500C-F12

CRN: 90221

Resrch In Philosophy

Supervised independent research in philosophy. Admission by approval.

PHIL0500D-F12

CRN: 91000

Resrch In Philosophy

Supervised independent research in philosophy. Admission by approval.

PHIL0500F-F12

CRN: 90631

Resrch In Philosophy

Supervised independent research in philosophy. Admission by approval.

PHIL0500G-F12

CRN: 90636

Resrch In Philosophy

Supervised independent research in philosophy. Admission by approval.

PHIL0500I-F12

CRN: 91371

Resrch In Philosophy

Supervised independent research in philosophy. Admission by approval.

PHIL0700A-F12

CRN: 90225

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700B-F12

CRN: 90671

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700C-F12

CRN: 90699

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700D-F12

CRN: 91001

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700F-F12

CRN: 90701

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700G-F12

CRN: 90799

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700I-F12

CRN: 91372

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700J-F12

CRN: 91651

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)