Noah Graham

Professor of Physics

ngraham at middlebury dot edu

 work802.443.3423
 fax(802) 443-2072
 Spring 2016: Tues. 8:30-9:30 AM, Wed. 1:30-2:30 PM, Thurs. 1:30-2:30 PM, and by appointment.
 McCardell Bicentennial Hall 533
 B. A., Harvard 1994; Ph. D., MIT 1999
 since 2002

 

Please visit my webpage at http://community.middlebury.edu/~ngraham.

 
MiddTags:

Courses

Course List: 

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

FYSE1214 - Space, Time, & Measurement      

Space, Time, and Measurement
The ability to precisely measure time and distance is essential to modern science and technology. As measurement technologies developed, they led to scientific discoveries that redefined our fundamental understanding of space, time and measurement themselves. We will follow this process from Galileo’s pendulum through Einstein’s theory of relativity and modern applications in quantum mechanics and cosmology. We will use historical and scientific texts, analytic writing, and a few hands-on activities to understand these ideas and their impact on science and society. 3 hrs. sem. CW DED SCI

Fall 2013

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INTD0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
Approval Required

Winter 2013, Winter 2014, Winter 2015, Winter 2016

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PHYS0110 - Electricity & Magnetism      

Electricity and Magnetism
The physical principles of electricity and magnetism are developed and applied to the electrical structure of matter and the electromagnetic nature of light. Practical topics from electricity and magnetism include voltage, current, resistance, capacitance, inductance, and AC and DC circuits. Laboratory work includes an introduction to electronics and to important instruments such as the oscilloscope. (PHYS 0109; MATH 0122 concurrent or prior) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. DED SCI

Fall 2014, Fall 2015

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PHYS0212 - Applied Math For Phys. Science      

Applied Mathematics for the Physical Sciences
This course concentrates on the methods of applied mathematics used for treating the partial differential equations that commonly arise in physics, chemistry, and engineering. Topics include differential vector calculus, Fourier series, and other orthogonal function sets. Emphasis will be given to physical applications of the mathematics. Both analytic and numerical methods are employed. This course is a prerequisite for all 0300- and 0400-level physics courses. (MATH 0122; PHYS 0110 concurrent or prior) 4.5 hrs. lect. DED

Spring 2014, Spring 2015, Spring 2016

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PHYS0350 - Statistical Mechanics      

Statistical Mechanics
The course opens with a review of classical thermodynamics and continues with an examination of the fundamental concepts of probability, statistics, and distribution functions. These topics are followed by in-depth discussion of the concepts of energy, energy quantization, and the application of these concepts to the modeling of macroscopic systems. The remainder of the course is a study of statistical mechanics and its application to a variety of classical and quantum systems. Topics covered include statistical thermodynamics, Maxwellian distributions, imperfect gases, equipartition theorem, quantum statistics, heat capacities of solids, electromagnetic radiation, and ideal quantum gases. (PHYS 0202 and PHYS 0212) 3 hrs. lect.

Fall 2015

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PHYS0380 - General Relativity      

General Relativity
Among the forces of nature, gravity is both the most familiar and the least well-understood. A hundred years after it was formulated by Einstein, General Relativity remains our best fundamental theory of gravity. In this course we will see how gravity emerges from the geometry of curved spacetime and how this picture leads to phenomena such as black holes, gravitational waves, and the expansion of the universe. (MATH 0200, PHYS 0201, and PHYS 0212) 3 hrs. lect. DED SCI

Fall 2016

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PHYS0401 - Quantum Mechanics      

Quantum Mechanics
A fundamental course in quantum mechanics aimed at understanding the mathematical structure of the theory and its application to physical phenomena at the atomic and nuclear levels. Topics include the basic postulates of quantum mechanics, operator formalism, Schrödinger equation, one-dimensional and central potentials, angular momentum and spin, perturbation theory, and systems of identical particles. (PHYS 0202 and PHYS 0212; MATH 0200 recommended) 3 hrs. lect.

Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2016

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PHYS0500 - Ind. Study & Special Topic      

Independent Study and Special Topics
(Approval required)

Winter 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017

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PHYS0704 - Senior Project      

Senior Project
Independent research project culminating in both written and oral presentations.

Winter 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Spring 2016

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PHYS0705 - Senior Research & Thesis      

Senior Research and Thesis
Independent research in the fall, winter, and spring terms culminating in a written thesis (two units total). (Approval required)

Winter 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017

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Department of Physics

McCardell Bicentennial Hall
276 Bicentennial Way
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753