Middlebury

 

Allison DiBianca

Visiting Scholar

Email: 
Phone: work802.443.2190

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

PSYC 0202 - Research Methods in Psychology      

Research Methods in Psychology
This course will provide students with an understanding of the research methodology used by psychologists. Students will learn to read psychological studies and other related research as informed consumers. Students will collect, analyze, and interpret data during lab assignments. They will also design an empirical study, review the related literature, and write a formal APA-style research proposal. (PSYC 0105 and PSYC 0201; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hr. lab

CW DED

Spring 2013, Fall 2013

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PSYC 0225 - Child Development      

Child Development
In this course, we will examine the nature of developmental change from the prenatal period through middle childhood. Our critical examination of developmental processes will invite us to consider various theoretical perspectives (e.g., learning, cognitive, biological, contextual) across various domains of development (i.e., physical, social-emotional, and cognitive). We will address major themes in developmental psychology, such as the interrelatedness of development across domains, the contributions of nature and nurture, and the relative continuity versus discontinuity of developmental change. Throughout, we will practice applying developmental principles to practical settings, policy issues, and topics of current interest. (PSYC 0105; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

SOC

Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013

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PSYC 0350 - Directed Research      

Directed Research in Psychology
Directed research provides opportunities for advanced students to become familiar with and participate in ongoing research projects under the direction of a faculty member. The student will first read background literature on the content area to be investigated and experimental methodologies to be used. Procedures involved in conducting psychological research will then be learned through firsthand experience. Potential activities include the design of research and the defining of conceptual variables and the gathering, analyzing, and interpretation of data. Finally, students will learn how to write technical articles in psychology by preparing a paper describing the project, using APA style. (Approval required; not open to first-year students) 3 hrs. lect.

Spring 2014

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PSYC 0500 - Advanced Research      

Advanced Research
A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced students majoring in psychology. (Approval required)

Spring 2014

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PSYC 1020 - Moral Minds      

Moral Minds: The Psychology of Morality
We have all “taken one for the team,” stood loyally by friends, overcome desires to cheat, and helped others before ourselves. We have also all stretched the truth to make ourselves look better, treated others intolerantly, and given preferential treatment to a friend. What motivates us to act in these moral and immoral ways? Are these actions guided by emotion or by reason? Are there moral limits of tolerance or helping others? What makes these actions “moral” in the first place? In this course, we will grapple with these issues by exploring moral psychology from developmental, evolutionary, and cultural perspectives. We will consider whether humans are innately selfish, how we come to have a sense of right and wrong, and whether our moral psychology is shaped by our culture. Is there one moral mind or many moral minds? We will apply theories and concepts of moral psychology to issues debated in Supreme Court cases, while also becoming attuned to the subtle, often unnoticed patterning of moral psychology in our everyday lives. Throughout this course, we will try to step outside our own moralities to consider the moral motives of people with whom we do not necessarily agree. This course counts as elective credit towards the Psychology major.

SOC WTR

Winter 2013

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