Emad El-Genidy

Faculty

 
 work802.443.5230

Emad El-Genidy holds an M.A. in Teaching English as a Foreign Language from the American University in Cairo, Egypt, and a Ph.D. in applied linguistics from Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt. He also holds an English-Arabic Translation Diploma from Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt. He first taught at the Middlebury College Arabic School in 2007. Currently, he heads the Graduate Studies Unit at the English Language Institute, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. His research interests include syntax, contrastive analysis, sociolinguistics, and testing.

 

 

 
MiddTags:

Courses

Course List: 

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

ARBC 3401 - Advanced Arabic I      

Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Text:

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2007. ISBN 9789774161087

Additional texts selected by the instructors

Summer 2013, Summer 2014 Language Schools, Summer 2015 Language Schools

More Information »

ARBC 3402 - Advanced Arabic I      

Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Text:

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2007. ISBN 9789774161087

Additional texts selected by the instructors

A variety of additional texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

Summer 2013, Summer 2014 Language Schools, Summer 2015 Language Schools

More Information »

ARBC 3403 - Advanced Arabic I      

Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Text:

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2007. ISBN 9789774161087

Additional texts selected by the instructors

Summer 2013, Summer 2014 Language Schools, Summer 2015 Language Schools

More Information »

ARBC 3404 - Advanced Arabic I      

Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Text:

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2007. ISBN 9789774161087

Additional texts selected by the instructors

Summer 2013, Summer 2014 Language Schools, Summer 2015 Language Schools

More Information »

ARBC 6508 - Contemp Arab Literature      

Contemporary Arab Literature (Graduate Level)

This course is designed for very advanced students who have completed at least four years of Arabic. It is especially suited to graduate students, junior scholars, and those whose primary teaching and research are conducted in Arabic. Students explore various aspects of contemporary Arab societies including art, literature, media, and culture. They study classical and modern poetry, short stories, novels, and contemporary political discourses. Students in this course have regular and frequent opportunities to expand their vocabulary in a broad range of debates and discussions surrounding these disciplines, and in the context of the Middlebury College's Arabic-only environment. Classes feature daily discussions as well as meetings with visiting scholars that work together to provide unparalleled exposure to high level Arabic. In addition, students review grammar and hone their writing skills by completing short daily essays, papers and final research projects. (2 units)

Summer 2011

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ARBC 6690 - Teaching Arabic as a FL      

Current Issues in Teaching Arabic as a Foreign Language

The course provides an overview of the history of teaching Arabic as a second/foreign language and the current approaches adopted in Arabic language programs and classrooms. Students will be acquainted with a variety of methods, techniques and activities for teaching the four skills, grammar, vocabulary and culture. Training also includes the use of textbooks, preparation of materials as well as learner strategies. Arabic specific issues such as the use of dialect and the place of media Arabic in the curriculum will be explored. Pedagogy

Summer 2012

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ARBC 6698 - Language Practicum      

This is a one unit course which is designed to give graduate students an opportunity to reflect on Arabic pedagogical theories and become familiar with a range of teaching strategies and techniques. The course includes class observation, lesson planning, a micro-teaching component and actual teaching demonstrations of the language skills. Students are required to conduct interviews with professional instructors during which they discuss the best practices as well as problems encountered in teaching the beginning, intermediate and advanced college level Arabic classes. To address the linguistic phenomenon of diglossia, students will practice teaching Arab dialect(s) alongside the formal varieties of the language. The course is offer in the last summer session towards the completion of the Master’s degree.

Summer 2015 Language Schools

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The Arabic School

Sunderland Language Center 
Middlebury College 
P: 802.443.5230
F: 802.443.2075

Mailing address
Arabic School
14 Old Chapel Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT  05753

Barbara Walter, Coordinator
arabicschool@middlebury.edu