Carol Rifelj Faculty Lecture Series 2018-2019

Join faculty, staff, and community members at the Carol Rifelj Faculty Lecture Series to hear faculty members discuss their research.

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This lecture series is named for the late Carol de Dobay Rifelj, who came to Middlebury in 1972 as an Assistant Professor, serving also at that time as Director of the Château, and of the French House. Carol received tenure in 1979, was promoted to the rank of Full Professor in 1985, and was named Jean Thomson Fulton Professor of French in 1993. She retired from Middlebury in spring 2010 after 38 years on the faculty. An energetic scholar, Carol was the author of several books and numerous articles and essays. She was also active and innovative in electronic publication, producing a significant website, Le Lexique, that won a prize in 1996 from the American Association of Teachers of French and has continued to be an influential resource for French teachers worldwide.

During her time on the faculty, Carol served on all of the College’s major committees, and she held numerous administrative posts, serving as Dean of the French School from 1985 to 1987, as Dean of the Faculty from 1991 to 1993, and as the Dean for Faculty Development and Research from 2004 to 2007. Carol was an unstinting supporter and advocate for the faculty and their professional development. It is thus richly appropriate that this lecture series, which features Middlebury's own faculty, bears her name.

All are welcome to attend

Lectures will be held in The Orchard (Room 103), The Franklin Environmental Center at Hillcrest. Please note that a class is in session in this room until 4:15 p.m.

*Wednesday, March 6 will be held in Mead Chapel.

 

Wednesday, September 26, 4:30 p.m.

Pat Manley, Department of Geology; Director of the Sciences, “Seismic Triggered Lacustrine Landslides and Lake Tsunamis in Lake Champlain”

Wednesday, October 24, 4:30 p.m.

Christal Brown, Department of Dance; Director of MiddCORE, “Art and Innovation: Understanding Transferrable Skills”

Wednesday, November 7, 4:30 p.m.

David Stoll, Department of Sociology/Anthropology, “‘My daughter is looking for a better future’: How Central American Asylum Claims could affect the 2020 Presidential Race”

Wednesday, November 14, 4:30 p.m.

Pieter Broucke, Department of History of Art and Architecture; Director of Arts, “Two Temples and a Portico: the Ptolemaic structures on Yeronisos, Cyprus”

Wednesday, November 28, 4:30 p.m.

Caitlin Myers, Department of Economics, “Measuring the Burden: An Empirical Approach to Understanding how Abortion Policy Shapes Women’s Lives”

Wednesday, January 16, 4:30 p.m.

Gary Margolis, Executive Director Emeritus, College Mental Health Services; Department of English and American Literatures, “The Poetry of Sport, The Sport in Poetry” 

Wednesday, February 20, 4:30 p.m.

Amit Prakash, First Year Seminar Program, “The French Connection: The French Wars of Empire and Contemporary American Police Practices”

Wednesday, February 27, 4:30 p.m.

Frank van Gansbeke, Enterprise and Business Program, “Blockchain in the Liberal Arts?: Emerging Opportunities for a Sustainable Society”

Wednesday, March 6, 4:30 p.m. *(Will be held in Mead Chapel)

Emory Fanning, Professor Emeritus of Music, “Bach Publishes: The Six Schübler Chorale Preludes of Johann Sebastian Bach”

Wednesday, March 13, 4:30 p.m.

Christopher Andrews, Department of Computer Science, “Where’s the Artist? Explorations in Generative Art”

Wednesday, April 3, 4:30 p.m.

Michelle McCauley, Department of Psychology, “Small Changes in Word Choice make Big Differences for Environmental Support”

Wednesday, April 10, 4:30 p.m.

Michael Kramer, Acting Director, Digital Liberal Arts, “The Republic of Rock: Music & Citizenship in the Global Sixties Counterculture”