Ellery Foutch

Assistant Professor of American Studies

 
 work802.443.5768
 by appointment

 

Courses

Course List: 

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

AMST 0209 / ENAM 0209 - Am. Lit. & Cult: origins-1830      

American Literature and Culture: Origins-1830
A study of literary and other cultural forms in early America, including gravestones, architecture, furniture and visual art. We will consider how writing and these other forms gave life to ideas about religion, diversity, civic obligation and individual rights that dominated not only colonial life but that continue to influence notions of "Americanness" into the present day. 3 hrs. lect./disc. LIT NOR

Fall 2015

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AMST 0214 - Capturing Nature      

Mastodons, Mermaids, and Dioramas: Capturing Nature in America
Why did 18th-century museums stuff and mount exotic and domestic animals? Why does the American Museum of Natural History still house dioramas of so-called native peoples hunting? How has the study and staging of nature transferred into various kinds of artistic expression? In this course we will examine the intertwining of art, science, and ecology in the United States from the 1700s to the present day. Objects of study will include museum dioramas, scientific models, artifacts and artworks collected during scientific expeditions, and the work of Walton Ford and Christy Rupp, contemporary artists whose work engages ecological issues. 3 hrs. lect. ART NOR

Fall 2014

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AMST 0243 - American Bodies      

American Bodies
In this course we will examine the material culture of the body and the body as material culture. Themes to be explored include skin (tattoos, tans, cosmetics), muscle (exercise and ideal bodies, historical and contemporary), adornment (fashion, jewelry, body modification practices), health crazes, performance, medical imaging, and enhancement (fictional and technological cyborgs, plastic surgery). We will explore practices that fragment the body and objects that were exchanged as tokens of affection, such as 19th century hairwork and eye miniatures. Historical figures to be discussed include cosmetics magnate Madame C.J. Walker, health enthusiasts Sylvester Graham and the Kellogg brothers, bodybuilder and exercise entrepreneur Eugen Sandow, dancer Josephine Baker, efficiency expert Frederick Winslow Taylor, and P.T. Barnum’s collaborations with performers such as Tom Thumb and the conjoined twins Chang and Eng. 3 hrs. lect. NOR

Fall 2014

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AMST 0324 / HARC 0324 - AmCiv War: Art&Visual Culture      

The American Civil War in Art and Visual Culture, Present
We will examine the art, artifacts, and material culture of the “War Between the States,” from flag and uniform design, periodical illustrations, and photography, to Sanitary Fairs, fundraisers, and keepsakes. History and genre paintings by Winslow Homer and Lilly Martin Spencer will illuminate both battlefield and homefront. We will also explore the legacy of the Civil War, analyzing monuments and memorials, anniversary commemorations (especially the 1960s Centennial and the Civil Rights Movement), reenactments, and contemporary artists’ engagement with the War’s visual imagery (Kara Walker, Glenn Ligon, Matthew Day Jackson). Several sessions will meet at the Middlebury College Museum of Art. 3 hrs. lect. ART HIS NOR

Spring 2015

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AMST 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

Fall 2014, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Spring 2016

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AMST 0710 - Honors Thesis      

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0705, and qualify to write two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

Spring 2015, Spring 2016

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FYSE 1447 - Capturing Nature      

Mastodons, Mermaids, and Dioramas: Capturing Nature in the Americas
Why did 18th-century museums stuff and mount exotic and domestic animals? Why does the American Museum of Natural History still house dioramas of so-called "native peoples" hunting? How has the study and staging of nature transferred into various kinds of artistic expression? In this seminar we will examine the intertwining of art, science, and ecology in the United States from the 1700s to the present day. Objects of study will include museum dioramas, scientific models, artifacts, and artworks collected during scientific expeditions, as well as the work of Walton Ford and Christy Rupp, contemporary artists whose works engage ecological issues. 3 hrs. sem. ART CW NOR

Fall 2015

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Program in American Studies

Axinn Center at Starr Library
15 Old Chapel Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753