Middlebury

 

Pat Manley

Professor of Geology

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Phone: work802.443.5430
Office Hours: Tuesday & Wednesday 9 - 10 a.m.
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Pat Manley received her doctorate from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University in Marine Geology and Geophysics. She began teaching at Middlebury College in the Fall of 1989. Pat teaches courses from introductory geology courses (Ocean Floor, Dynamic Earth, Earthquakes & Volcanoes) and as well as upper division courses in Geophysics, Marine Geology and Sedimentology. She routinely involves students in her research on Lake Champlain sediments as well as Holocene paleoclimate research in the North Atlantic and along the bays and fjords of Antarctica.

 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

FYSE 1374 - The Champlain Basin      

The Champlain Basin
From the Green Mountains to the east and the Adirondacks Mountains to the west, the Champlain Basin is a natural laboratory in which to study many of the forces that shape the earth. In this seminar we will use the fundamentals of physical geology and limnology to develop an appreciation and understanding of the geologic landscape of Vermont and New York. We will investigate how these mountains were built, how rivers and glaciers erode them, and how the Champlain Basin came into its present shape. Excursions will include local field areas as well as work on Lake Champlain using Middlebury’s new research vessel the R/V Folger 3 hrs sem/3 hrs field each week

CW

Fall 2012

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GEOL 0142 - The Ocean Floor      

The Ocean Floor
Have you wanted to view the ocean floor from a submersible? It is a dark but dynamic place. The constant interchange between water and sediments has created sedimentary drifts and mudwaves over 500 feet high! Earthquakes cause underwater mud avalanches that travel over 60 m.p.h. Hydrothermal vents along the ocean ridges host a variety of unusual plant and animal life. This course will explore the ocean depths via the classroom and will introduce the development of ocean basins, their evolution, and processes occurring within them (Students who have completed GEOL 0170 are not permitted to register for GEOL 0142.) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

SCI

Spring 2010, Spring 2012, Spring 2014

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GEOL 0170 - The Dynamic Earth      

The Dynamic Earth
Sea-floor spreading and continental drift, earthquakes and volcanoes, origin and evolution of mountain systems, and concepts of plate tectonics are viewed in light of the geology of ocean basins and continents. Modern processes such as river, coastal, wind, and glaciers will be studied and their effect on shaping the geologic landscape. Laboratory: field problems in Vermont geology; interpretation of geologic maps, regional tectonic synthesis. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab/field trips

SCI

Fall 2011, Fall 2013

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GEOL 0241 - Sedimentary Rocks      

Sedimentary Rocks
This course will provide an overview of the tools used in determining depositional environments and tectonic settings of sedimentary rocks. Lectures will cover depositional systems and facies relationships, stratigraphic principles, origin of sedimentary structures and textures. Labs and field trips will include methods in sedimentary basin analysis, and sedimentary petrology. (formerly GEOL 0321) (Any 0100-level geology course or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab/field trips

SCI

Spring 2013

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GEOL 0342 - Marine Geology      

Marine Geology
The oceans cover over 70 percent of the Earth's surface, but only in the last few decades has extensive investigation of the geology of the Earth beneath the sea been possible. This course will present the results of these continuing investigations. Although the whole field of marine geology will be reviewed, the emphasis will be on marine sediments and sedimentary processes and paleoceangraphy. Laboratory: synthesis of geological and geophysical data concerning a selected region of the ocean, with special emphasis on the results of the Deep Sea Drilling Project. (GEOL 0161 or GEOL 0170) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab

Fall 2012, Fall 2014

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GEOL 0382 - Geophysics      

Geophysics
An introduction to the physical nature of the Earth from two perspectives: 1) Whole-Earth Geophysics: the large-scale properties of the planet, including formation, structure, gravity, orbital properties, and seismology, and 2) Geophysical Exploration: acquisition and interpretation of geophysical data derived from surface and satellite-based observation. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

Spring 2012, Spring 2014

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GEOL 0400 - Senior Thesis Research Seminar      

Senior Thesis Research Seminar
This seminar will focus on methods and strategies for completing advanced geological research and provides a springboard for senior thesis research. Topics will include field and laboratory techniques, primary literature review, and scientific writing. Students taking this course are expected to be simultaneously working on the early stages of their senior thesis research. During the semester students will present a thesis proposal and the seminar will culminate with each student completing a draft of the first chapter of their senior thesis. GEOL 0400 is required of all geology majors. 3 hrs. disc. or lab

Fall 2013

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GEOL 0500 - Readings And Research      

Readings and Research
Individual or group independent study, laboratory or field research projects, readings and discussion of timely topics in earth and environmental science. (Approval only)

Spring 2010, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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GEOL 0700 - Senior Thesis Research      

Upon completion of GEOL 0400, all senior geology majors will continue their independent senior thesis research by taking one unit of GEOL 0700. This research will culminate in a written thesis which must be orally defended. (Approval only)

Spring 2010, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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GEOL 1009 - Geology of National Parks      

Geology of National Parks
The collision of continents, the passage of glaciers, and time itself have sculpted our country, creating landscapes that have captivated humankind's attention for generations. In this course we will develop the sequence of events that have led to the formation of many such natural wonders found in our national parks. We will proceed through lectures focused on basic geology and plate tectonic theory; textbook readings about specific parks; in-class and homework exercises that develop familiarity with important geologic materials and methods; and a number of virtual excursions to the parks.

SCI WTR

Winter 2013

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IPOL 8568 - OceanPrspctiv:Enrgy&MineralRsc      

Continental margins are being exploited for their energy and mineral resources (oil, gas, and ore deposits). What are the necessary conditions needed for these resources to be present along continental margins and how safe is their extraction? Besides being a location for these resources, the coastline represents a highly variable and dynamic region between land and water; with periods of dynamic change from days to 100,000s of years (tides and storms to global sea level variations). In many parts of the world, mankind's present and/or desired use of these fragile and transitory boundaries often conflicts with how these regions should be managed. Though the use of various case studies, we will focus on the origins and extraction of energy and mineral resources as well as coastline structure, dynamic interaction between ocean and land, sea level rise, and past use and newer management practices.

Course meets Jan 10 – 14, Jan 17 – 21st from 9am – 4 pm with 1 hour lunch break. A few afternoon field trips are being planned. Course will have daily quizzes and a final presentation.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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Recent Publications

  1. Manley, P.L., T.O. Manley, K. Hayo and T.M. Cronin, (2011) Small-scale Lacustrine Drifts in Lake Champlain, Vermont, Journal of Great Lakes Research. doi:10.1016/j.jglr.2011.05.004
  2. Manley, P.L. and T.O. Manley, In a Slump, 2009, Professional Surveyors Magazine, 29: 18-20
  3. Michalchuk, B., J.B. Anderson, J.S. Wellner, P.L. Manley, W. Majewski, and S. Bohaty, 2009, Holocene climate and glacial history of the northeastern Antarctic Peninsula: The marine sedimentary record from a long SHALDRIL core, Quaternary Science Reviews, DOI: 10.1016/j.quascirev.2009.08.012
  4. Cronin, T.M., P. L. Manley, S. Brachfeld, T. O. Manley, D. A. Willard, J.P. Guilbault, J. A. Rayburn, R. Thunell, and M. Berke, 2008, Impacts of post-glacial lacustrine drainage events and revised chronology of the Champlain Sea episode 13-9 ka, Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 262, p. 46-60.