Middlebury

 

Tom Manley

Visiting Assistant Professor of Geology

Email: 
Phone: work802.443.3114
Office Hours: By appointment
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Tom Manley received his doctorate from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University in physical oceanography of mesoscale dynamics in the Arctic Ocean and Greenland Sea. He began teaching at Middlebury College in the Fall of 1990. Tom teaches Oceanography, Coastal Processes and multi-dimensional visualization courses. His work is in the hydrodynamics of Lake Champlain and the Buffalo River. This work has management implications and is often used by municipalities in how best to preserve and keep Lake Champlain healthy.

 

 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

GEOL 0161 - Elements of Oceanography      

Elements of Oceanography
Oceanographic exploration is introduced through study of ocean basins and continental margins. The multidisciplinary nature of oceanography is emphasized by using principles of marine geology, geophysics, geochemistry, and biology to address contemporary problems. Techniques of data collection and analysis are taught aboard the College's research vessel, R/V Folger, located on Lake Champlain. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab/field trips

DED SCI

Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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GEOL 0500 - Readings And Research      

Readings and Research
Individual or group independent study, laboratory or field research projects, readings and discussion of timely topics in earth and environmental science. (Approval only)

Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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GEOL 0700 - Senior Thesis Research      

Upon completion of GEOL 0400, all senior geology majors will continue their independent senior thesis research by taking one unit of GEOL 0700. This research will culminate in a written thesis which must be orally defended. (Approval only)

Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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GEOL 1023 - Coastal Processes      

Coastal Processes
The coastline represents a highly variable and dynamic region between land and water, with periods of dynamic change from days (tides and storms) to hundreds of thousands of years (global sea level variations). In many parts of the world, mankind's present and/or desired use of these fragile and transitory boundaries often conflicts with how these regions should be managed. Though the use of various case studies, this course will focus on coastline structure, dynamic interaction between ocean and land, sea level rise, as well as past use and newer management practices.

SCI WTR

Winter 2014

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GEOL 1052 - Scientific Visualization      

Multi-Dimensional Scientific Visualization
There is an increasing requirement for sophisticated visualization tools to help solve spatially complex systems (n parameters in 2D or 3D). This course will provide hands-on experience with a commercially available multi-dimensional software package. Students are encouraged to provide their own data sets if at all possible, but will be provided data sets otherwise. Classroom instruction will concentrate on the aspects of learning how to transform observational data into multi-dimensional visual imagery, validation of the results, and subsequent manipulation of the imagery. A final project will be orally presented.

SCI WTR

Winter 2013

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IPOL 8568 - OceanPrspctiv:Enrgy&MineralRsc      

Continental margins are being exploited for their energy and mineral resources (oil, gas, and ore deposits). What are the necessary conditions needed for these resources to be present along continental margins and how safe is their extraction? Besides being a location for these resources, the coastline represents a highly variable and dynamic region between land and water; with periods of dynamic change from days to 100,000s of years (tides and storms to global sea level variations). In many parts of the world, mankind's present and/or desired use of these fragile and transitory boundaries often conflicts with how these regions should be managed. Though the use of various case studies, we will focus on the origins and extraction of energy and mineral resources as well as coastline structure, dynamic interaction between ocean and land, sea level rise, and past use and newer management practices.

Course meets Jan 10 – 14, Jan 17 – 21st from 9am – 4 pm with 1 hour lunch break. A few afternoon field trips are being planned. Course will have daily quizzes and a final presentation.

Spring 2011 - MIIS

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Recent Publications

  1. Manley, P.L., T.O. Manley, K. Hayo and T.M. Cronin, (2011) Small-scale Lacustrine Drifts in Lake Champlain, Vermont, Journal of Great Lakes Research. doi:10.1016/j.jglr.2011.05.004
  2. Manley, T.O., M. McCormick, J-C. Gascard, P. Tillier; K. L Hunkins, P. L. Manley (2011) An Initial View of Subsurface Lagrangian Observations in Lake Champlain; General Patterns, Cross-lake Flow and Coastal Currents. Journal of Great Lakes Research.
  3. Manley, T.O., (2010) Drifters, Drogues, and Circulation, Oceanography, December 2010, p. 165-171.
  4. Manley, P.L.  and T.O. Manley, In a Slump, 2009, Professional Surveyors Magazine, vol. 29, p. 18-20