Middlebury

 

Jessica Teets

Assistant Professor of Political Science

Email: 
Phone: work802.443.5528
Office Hours: Monday 9:00 - 10:00; Wednesday 10:00 - 12:00 and by appt.
Download Contact Information

Jessica C. Teets is an Assistant Professor in the Political Science Department at Middlebury College, and Associate Editor of the Journal of Chinese Political Science.  Her research focuses on governance and policy diffusion in authoritarian regimes, specifically the role of civil society.  She is the author of Civil Society Under Authoritarianism: The China Model (Cambridge University Press, 2014) and editor (with William Hurst) of Local Governance Innovation in China: Experimentation, Diffusion, and Defiance (Routledge Contemporary China Series, 2014).  Dr. Teets was recently selected to participate in the Public Intellectuals Program created by the National Committee on United States-China Relations (NCUSCR), and is currently researching policy experimentation by local governments in China.

 

Courses


indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IGST 0403 / PSCI 0403 / INTL 0403 - India and China Compared      

India and China: 21st Century Superpowers?
In this course we will look at recent political and economic developments in India and China. We will examine the economic rise of India and China in contrast to their earlier economic stagnation. We will contrast political evolution into India's democracy and China's one-party autocracy, and we will study relations between the two states and their relations with the U.S. and the world. This course is equivalent to PSCI 0403. (PSCI 0103 or waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)

AAL CMP SOC

Fall 2011, Spring 2013

More Information »

IGST 0704 / INTL 0704 - EAS Senior Thesis      

Latin American Studies Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Winter 2012, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

More Information »

INTL 0500 - EAS Independent Research      

East Asian Studies Independent Project
(Approval Required)

Fall 2011

More Information »

IPEC 0500 - Independent Project      

Independent Project
(Approval Required)

Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

More Information »

IPEC 0700 - Intl.Pol.&Economics SR. Thesis      

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Winter 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

More Information »

PSCI 0103 - Intro to Comparative Politics      

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

CMP SOC

Fall 2011, Spring 2013, Spring 2015

More Information »

PSCI 0221 - Contemporary Chinese Politics      

Contemporary Chinese Politics
This introductory course provides students with a background on major political events in modern China beginning with the end of the Qing dynasty, and then investigates the major political issues in China today-—civil society activity, problems and benefits associated with deepening economic liberalization, and discourse from within the CCP on political reform. This course focuses first on economic reform issues, such as income inequality, the floating population, and changes in the socialist welfare model, and then on political reform issues, such as the liberalization of news media, NGO and civil society activity, protest and social movements, environmental protection, and legal reform. Course readings range from selections by Marx and Lenin to recent works in political science and sociology on the transformation of state and society under Communist Party rule. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

AAL SOC

Spring 2012, Spring 2015

More Information »

PSCI 0280 - Politics of Policy Innovation      

The Politics of Policy Innovation
Why do policymakers engage in policy innovation and experimentation? In this course we will explore the incentive structure facing policymakers to understand why they create new policies even if the outcome of experimentation is uncertain and perhaps risky. We will examine case studies from around the world, including countries at different levels of development and different regime types, to understand the conditions under which policymakers innovate. Finally, in this course, we will analyze the effectiveness of policy innovation and experimentation in generating positive outcomes such as economic growth and social welfare. 3 hrs. lect. (Comparative Politics)/

CMP SOC

Fall 2014

More Information »

PSCI 0330 - Comp Development Strategies      

Comparative Development Strategies
Why have some countries developed more rapidly than others? What do we mean by "development?" How can governments help or hinder development prospects? These broad questions are addressed by analyzing the development experiences of Asian, Latin American, and African countries. The course focuses particularly on what governments have done to try to accelerate the development process. To gain a historical perspective, the course begins with a brief consideration of the experiences of the now "developed" countries, followed by an examination of how difference countries have confronted the dilemmas of development of the 20th century. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

CMP SOC

Spring 2011, Fall 2014

More Information »

PSCI 0336 / ECON 0336 / ECON 1027 / PSCI 1027 - Political Econ of Development      

The Political Economy of Development
Why have some countries developed more rapidly than others? How can governments help or hinder the development process? In this course we will address these broad questions by analyzing the development of Asian, Latin American, and African countries. To gain a historical perspective we will begin with the experiences of the now "developed" countries, followed by an examination of how countries have confronted the dilemmas of development, such as corruption, income inequality, and environmental degradation. By studying development through a political economy lens, we will present the intersections between a political and economic understanding of the complex process of development. (Not open to students who have taken PSCI/ECON 1027) (Comparative Politics)/

AAL CMP SOC

Winter 2011, Spring 2012

More Information »

PSCI 0449 - Chinese Foreign Policy      

China's grand strategy is "peaceful rise," meaning that soft power is used to accomplish policy goals. In this course we will examine China's foreign policy at three levels. At the neighbor-state level, we will focus on territorial conflicts like Taiwan and Tibet, nuclear proliferation in North Korea, and security alliances between Japan and the US. At the regional level, we will analyze economic and environmental issues involving Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) states. At the international level, we will focus on oil diplomacy and China’s role in the UN. In addition to international factors, we will examine domestic explanations of policy such as legitimacy, culture, and ideology. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

AAL SOC

Spring 2011

More Information »

PSCI 0500 - Independent Project      

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Winter 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

More Information »

PSCI 0700 - Honors Thesis      

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Winter 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

More Information »

Curriculum Vitae 2014_cv_teets2014_cv_teets

 
Selected Publications

Teets, Jessica and William Hurst, eds. Local Governance Innovation in China: Experimentation, Diffusion, and Defiance. Routledge Contemporary China Series. October 2014.

Teets, Jessica. Civil Society under Authoritarianism: the China Model. Cambridge University Press. May 2014.

Teets, Jessica. “The Emergence of Consultative Authoritarianism in China: Contending Models of Civil Society Management in Yunnan and Beijing.” Forthcoming Journal of Contemporary China 24. January 2015.

Fitzgerald, Jennifer, David Leblang, and Jessica C. Teets. "Defying the Law of Gravity: The Political Economy of International Migration." World Politics 66, no. 03 (2014): 406-445.

Teets, Jessica. “Let Many Civil Societies Bloom: Regional Ideational Variation in China.” The China Quarterly. January 2013. http://journals.cambridge.org/repo_A88RJVV3