Middlebury

 

Murray Dry

Charles A. Dana Professor of Political Science

Email: 
Phone: work802.443.5305
Office Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 4:30 - 6:00 and by appointment
Download Contact Information

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

FYSE 1030 - Love & Friendship      

Love and Friendship
We will start with Plato's Phaedrus, to learn about love and its relationship to speaking and writing, and then turn to Aristotle's Ethics, to consider friendship in relation to politics. Then we will read: Jane Austen’s Persuasion; Shakespeare Sonnets; Montaigne's essay, "Of Friendship"; Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra, and A Midsummer Night’s Dream; Flaubert’s Madame Bovary;
Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina; and Plato’s Symposium. We will also study The Trivium: The Liberal Arts of Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric, by Sister Miriam Joseph, and we will watch two movies: The Philadelphia Story and Anna Karenina.

CW EUR LIT PHL

Fall 2011

More Information »

PSCI 0101 - Intro to Political Philosophy      

Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)

EUR PHL SOC

Spring 2012, Fall 2014

More Information »

PSCI 0102 - American Political Regime      

The American Political Regime
This is a course in American political and constitutional thought. The theme, taken from de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, is the problem of freedom. The first half covers the American founding up through the Civil War and the "refounding." This includes de Tocqueville, Madison's Notes on the Debates in the Federal Convention, the Federalist-Anti-Federalist ratification debate, Supreme Court decisions (Marbury, McCulloch), writings of Jefferson, Calhoun, and Lincoln. The second half considers basic problems in American politics, such as race, gender, foreign policy, and education. Readings include a novel, de Tocqueville, and Supreme Court decisions (Brown, Frontiero, Roe, Casey, Grutter, Lawrence). 4 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

NOR SOC

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014

More Information »

PSCI 0305 - American Constitutional Law      

American Constitutional Law: The Federal System
This course examines the development of American constitutionalism through study of Supreme Court decisions. Every major topic but the bill of rights (see PSCI 0306) is covered. Using the Sullivan and Gunther Constitutional Law casebook, we begin with judicial review and then study the development of legal doctrines surrounding the commerce clause, the due process and equal protection clauses of the fourteenth amendment, and the separation of powers. Recent cases focus on affirmative action and federal protection of civil rights. Interpretive books and essays are considered, as time permits. A mock court exercise is anticipated. (Juniors and seniors with PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or PSCI 0306) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

NOR

Fall 2011, Fall 2013

More Information »

PSCI 0306 - American Constitutional Law      

American Constitutional Law: Individual Rights
This course focuses on the Supreme Court's interpretation of the first amendment freedoms of speech, press, and religion, and, to a lesser extent, the rights of the accused, as reflected in amendments four through eight. It includes consideration of philosophic arguments regarding speech and religion (Mill, Locke), the framing of the original bill of rights, and the constitutional history of free speech in America (Levy). Sullivan and Gunther's Constitutional Lawis the text; written work includes three or four essays, a mock court exercise, and a final exam. (Sophomores, juniors, and seniors with PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or PSCI 0205 or PSCI 0206 or PSCI 0305 or waiver) 4.5 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

NOR PHL

Fall 2010, Fall 2012, Fall 2014

More Information »

PSCI 0317 - Ancient & Med. Pol. Philosophy      

Ancient and Medieval Political Philosophy
We will study some classic works in ancient and medieval political philosophy: Plato (Laws, Republic); Aristotle (Ethics, Politics); Cicero (Republic, Laws), Maimonides (Guide to the Perplexed), Aquinas (Summa Theologica, Summa Contra Gentiles), Alfarabi (The Political Regime). (PSCI 0101 or PSCI 0107 or by waiver) 4 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)/

PHL SOC

Fall 2012, Fall 2013

More Information »

PSCI 0318 - Modern Political Philosophy      

Modern Political Philosophy
In this course. we will study: Machiavelli (Prince, Discourses); Bacon
(Advancement of Learning); Hobbes (Leviathan); Locke (Second Treatise);
Spinoza (Theological-Political Treatise); Montesquieu (Spirit of the Laws);
Rousseau (Social Contract); Burke (Reflections); Kant (Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals, Perpetual Peace); Hegel (Introduction to Philosophy of History); Marx (Communist Manifesto, German Ideology, Capital); Nietzsche
(Beyond Good and Evil); Heidegger (Question Concerning Technology).
We will examine modernity's rejection of ancient thought, its later replacement of nature by history as the standard for right, and its subsequent rejection of any standard of right. Other topics include religion, freedom ofspeech, and the separation of powers. (PSCI 0101 or PSCI 0107 or PSCI 0317, or PSCI 0333, or waiver) 4.5 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)/

EUR PHL SOC

Fall 2010, Spring 2013

More Information »

PSCI 0344 - Race, Sex, & the Constitution      

Race, Sex, and the Constitution
In this course we will examine how courts in America have framed and decided cases involving sex and race. We will consider issues such as sex discrimination, birth control and abortion, and sexual orientation, as well as the Court's doctrine concerning heightened levels of scrutiny for suspect classifications and fundamental rights. Course readings will consist of Supreme Court decisions, relevant state supreme court and lower federal court decisions on same sex marriage, and scholarly commentary. We will examine both the legitimacy and the efficacy of judicial power in these areas. Seniors needing to fulfill a political science seminar requirement may arrange with the instructor to do so. (PSCI 0102) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

NOR SOC

Spring 2011, Spring 2014

More Information »

PSCI 0500 - Independent Project      

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

PSCI 0700 - Honors Thesis      

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

PSCI 1010 - Same Sex Marriage and the Law      

Same Sex Marriage and Law
What are, or should be, the constitutional rights of same sex couples in the United States? The United States Supreme Court has struck down laws criminally punishing homosexual acts and it has held marriage to be a fundamental right, but it has not struck down traditional marriage laws. After a decade in which state courts have grappled with the subject under state constitutional law, celebrity lawyers Ted Olsen and David Boies have persuaded plaintiffs in California to make a "federal case out of it.” We will study same sex marriage from the perspectives of philosophy and law.

NOR SOC WTR

Winter 2011

More Information »

PSCI 1033 - Reading Adam Smith      

Reading Adam Smith
In this course we will read Adam Smith’s two great works, The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759) and The Wealth of Nations (1776). Smith’s The Wealth of Nations is known for its elaboration of the principles of liberal capitalism. However, understanding Smith’s full teaching requires a study of The Theory of Moral Sentiments, which contains a full discussion of the human passions, especially sympathy. Both works contain Smith’s famous “invisible hand” metaphor. As both Jefferson and Hamilton admired Smith’s work, and as Americans continue to debate the relationship between politics and economics, we will conclude by considering the application of Smith's principles to America. (Political Theory)

NOR PHL SOC WTR

Winter 2013

More Information »

Curriculum Vitae

 

 

Research Interests

American Constitutional Law
Political Philosophy
American Political Thought
Freeedom of Speech and Religious Liberty
Federalism
The Separation of Powers
The American Founding

Work in Progress

Same Sex Marriage and the Constitution (book)