Kim Cronise

Associate Professor of Psychology

 
 work802.443.5252
 Tuesdays 1:00-2:30; Thursdays 1:00-2:30
 McCardell Bicentennial Hall 278

Kim joined the Middlebury faculty in 2004.  She received her BS, MA and PhD in psychology and behavioral neuroscience from USC and completed her post-doctoral fellowship at the Portland Alcohol Research Center at Oregon Health and Sciences University.  

Kim was trained as a behavioral neuroscientist and psychopharmacologist.  Her expertise draws from several domains of neuroscience including developmental neuroscience, learning and memory, social neuroscience and addiction. She has spent most of her career investigating the neural mechanisms of fetal alcohol syndrome and alcohol addiction in a rodent model, but has recently changed direction. While her previous lines of research focused on how neuroplasticity could lead to adverse outcomes, her current research explores just the opposite: Kim is investigating how contemplative practices capitalize on neuroplasticity to promote well-being.  In fact, learning to practice mindfulness positively affects clinical outcomes for addiction, depression and anxiety disorders. The practices appear to shift brain function in ways that enhance attention, emotion and stress regulation, executive functioning and somatoform awareness. Though changes to functional outcomes occur, the specifics have not yet been identified (i.e. what changes, how the changes occur over time, and the neural correlates of change). To help answer some of these questions, Kim’s research program focuses on how mindfulness practices impact emotion regulation and interpersonal dynamics including aggressive and compassionate behaviors.   Her studies enlist both behavioral measures and neurophysiological measures including electrodermal response (EDR), neuroendocrine assays, and electroencephalograph (EEG) brain wave activity.  

Kim currently teaches the following courses: Mindfulness and Psychology, Physiological Psychology, Condition and Learning, Neurotoxicology and Teratology, Neuropsychology of Addiction, and Introductory Psychology. She will soon teach Behavioral Neuroscience and, hopefully, Social Neuroscience in the near future.

Kim also serves as a Faculty Advisor the undergraduate neuroscience journal: Impulse (http://impulse.appstate.edu/). This journal is run by undergraduate students at institutions throughout the U.S. and internationally. A goal of Impulse is to provide students a venue to write-up and publish their independent research projects for dissemination to the scientific community.  All articles are evaluated by student reviewers for scientific integrity and then recommended for publication or revision. Middlebury has a very accomplished team of student reviewers led by a student Associate Editor and the team works hard to ensure that Impulse articles meet the highest scientific standards.  Impulse’s scientific review process mirrors that of professional journals and provides students first-hand training in the peer-review process.  Student Associate Editors also have the privilege of attending and advocating for Impulse at national neuroscience conferences such as the Society for Neuroscience and the Federation for European Neuroscience Societies.   Participation is a great way to make an impact! Please feel free to inquire about getting involved!

 

Courses

Course List: 

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

NSCI0100 - Introduction to Neuroscience      

Introduction to Neuroscience
Neuroscience is the interdisciplinary, scientific study of the nervous system. In this course we will investigate basic nervous system structure and function while tracking the history and methodology of neuroscience. We will study examples of neurons, sensation, behavior, memory, thought, language, consciousness, the mind, and disorders of the nervous system. Through lectures, discussions, exercises, electronic sources, and guest lecturers we will examine the working principles of nervous systems, modern neuroscientific methods, and topical issues. We will appreciate why an interdisciplinary approach is best suited for understanding our brain and mind. (Open only to first and second year students) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SCI

Fall 2013

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NSCI0500 - Independent Research      

Independent Research
Students enrolled in NSCI 0500 complete individual research projects involving laboratory or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and approved in advance by a NSCI faculty advisor. This course is not open to seniors; seniors should enroll in NSCI 0700. (Approval required)

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017

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NSCI0700 - Senior Research      

Senior Research
This course is for senior NSCI majors who plan to conduct one or more semesters of independent research, or who plan to complete preparatory work toward a senior thesis, such as researching and writing a thesis proposal as well as, if appropriate, collecting data that will form the basis for a senior thesis. Senior NSCI majors who plan to complete a senior thesis should register initially for NSCI 0700. Additional requirements may include participation in weekly meetings with advisors and/or lab groups and attending neuroscience seminars. (Approval required, open to seniors only)

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017

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NSCI0701 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis
Senior NSCI majors who have completed one or more terms of NSCI 0700, who have a GPA of 3.3 in their major courses, and who plan to complete a senior thesis should register for NSCI 0701 for the final semester of the senior thesis process. Students enrolled in NSCI 0701 write a thesis, give a public presentation of their research, and present an oral defense of the thesis before a committee of at least two Neuroscience faculty members. Faculty may recommend High honors in Neuroscience after considering the quality of these components of a student’s thesis and the student’s GPA in major courses. Additional requirements may include participation in weekly meetings with advisors and/or lab groups and attending neuroscience seminars. (NSCI 0700, Approval required)

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017

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PSYC0105 - Introduction To Psychology      

Introduction to Psychology
This course will provide a general introduction to the field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, psychological disorders, and social behavior. (Open to Juniors and Seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs lect./1 hr. disc. SOC

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Fall 2016

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PSYC0301 / NSCI0301 - Physiological Psychology      

Physiological Psychology
This course concerns the biological basis of human behavior. The course will consider the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological bases of processes such as language, sensation, emotion, aggression, sleep, learning, and memory. In the laboratory the student will conduct experiments using standard (surgical, anatomical, biochemical, behavioral) techniques to investigate central nervous system function. (PSYC 0105 or any biology course; not open to first-year students; open to psychology majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. SCI

Fall 2012, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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PSYC0350 - Directed Research      

Directed Research in Psychology
Directed research provides opportunities for advanced students to become familiar with and participate in ongoing research projects under the direction of a faculty member. The student will first read background literature on the content area to be investigated and experimental methodologies to be used. Procedures involved in conducting psychological research will then be learned through firsthand experience. Potential activities include the design of research and the defining of conceptual variables and the gathering, analyzing, and interpretation of data. Finally, students will learn how to write technical articles in psychology by preparing a paper describing the project, using APA style. (Approval required; not open to first-year students) 3 hrs. lect.

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017

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PSYC0500 - Advanced Research      

Advanced Research
A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced students majoring in psychology. (Approval required)

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017

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PSYC0700 - Senior Research      

Senior Research
A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced senior majors in psychology. (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202; Approval required)

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017

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PSYC0701 - Senior Thesis Proposal      

Senior Thesis Proposal
Students hoping to be considered as candidates for departmental honors must enroll in PSYC 0701 under the sponsorship of a department faculty member and submit a formal, written research proposal to the department by 5 p.m. on the Wednesday during the final week of fall classes in their senior year. If the proposal is approved, the student will enroll in PSYC 0702 during the winter term and PSYC 0703 during the spring term of their senior year. (Feb graduates should consult with their advisors about the appropriate semester in which to begin a thesis.) (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202; Approval required)

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017

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PSYC0702 - Senior Thesis Second Semester      

Senior Thesis Second Semester
Students whose honors thesis proposal (PSYC 0701) has been approved will collect, analyze, and interpret their data. This is the second semester of the 3-semester senior thesis. (PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, and PSYC 0701; Approval required)

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017

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PSYC0703 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis*
This is the third and final semester of the senior thesis. Students will finish analyzing, and interpreting their data. This process culminates in a written thesis to be submitted by 4 p.m. on the Monday BEFORE the final week of spring classes, a presentation, and an oral defense. The decision about awarding departmental honors will be made after the student submits the thesis. (PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, and PSYC 0702; Approval required)

Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017

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RELI0209 / PSYC0209 - Mindfulness and Psychology      

Religion and Science: Mindfulness and Modern Psychology
Mindfulness meditation is now widely embraced as a way to enhance personal wellbeing. To better understand this ancient practice, we will explore its traditional Buddhist background alongside its application and study in modern psychology and neuroscience. We will first study mindfulness in its historical context and examine how a traditionally religious practice was adapted for modern individualistic and therapeutic purposes. We will learn basic neural and psychological foundations of emotion, cognition, social behavior, and psychological disorders and raise theoretical and methodological issues in the scientific study of mindfulness. As an experiential component, students will also receive meditation training throughout the semester. (Open to psychology, religion, and neuroscience majors) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

Spring 2015

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Presentations and publications (* indicates Middlebury student)

*Cullen, B., *Bruns, M., *Paritsky, A., *McGuirk, E., *Ogle, T., Kimble, M., & Cronise, K. (October, 2015). Neurophysiological correlates of self-referential activity in meditators and non-meditators. Poster presentation at Advances in Meditation Research, New York Academy of Sciences, New York City, NY. September 2015.  

*Cullen, B., *Bruns, M., *McGuirk, E., *Paritsky, A., *Ogle, T., Kimble, M. and Cronise, K. (June, 2015). Neurophysiological correlates of self-referential activity in meditators and non-meditators.  Poster session at the Mind and Life Summer Research Symposium, Garrison, NY.

*Cullen, B.; *Stallworthy, I., *Lesenskyj, A., *Boles, L., *Weinert-Stein, M., *Percelay, R., *McGuirk, E., Sellers, J. and Cronise, K. (Jan, 2015).  Do experienced meditators differ from non-meditators in emotion recognition, competitive reactions or compassionate responses? Poster session at University of Vermont Chapter for the Society for Neuroscience; Neuroscience, Behavior and Health Research Forum;  Burlington, VT.

*Cullen, B.; *Stallworthy, I., *Lesenskyj, A., *Boles, L., *Weinert-Stein, M., *Percelay, R., *McGuirk, E., Sellers, J. and Cronise, K. (Nov, 2014).  Do experienced meditators differ from non-meditators in emotion recognition, competitive reactions or compassionate responses? Poster session at Stanford CCARE, Science of Compassion Conference, San Francisco, CA.

*Kahn, H., *Raghunath, R., *Calhoun, C., *Lesenskyj, A., *Weinert-Stein, M., Cronise, K., & Sellers, J.  (January, 2014).  Can establishing a regular meditation practice reduce college students’ physiological responses to stressful testing situations and impact their social cognition?  Poster session at University of Vermont Chapter for the Society for Neuroscience; Neuroscience, Behavior and Health Research Forum;  Burlington, VT.

*Aye, M.F., *McNally, A., *Brown, K., *DuPre, N.,A., *Henschen, C., *Hudziak, V., *Lee, K., *Morrison, A., *Saeed, F., *Sullivan, A.K., *Williams, K., & Cronise, K. (2010).  Sex differences in alcohol tolerance and consumption in C57BL/6J mice.  Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, online.

*Maletsky, K., *Rose-Baker, M., *Aye, M., *Morrison, A. & Cronise, K. (2010).  An assessment of the effects of pregnenolone sulfate and intoxicated practice on alcohol tolerance and consumption in swiss webster mice.  Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, online.

Kelly, S. J., Leggett, D., and Cronise, K. (2009) Sexually dimorphic effects of alcohol exposure during development on processing of social cues.  Alcohol and Alcoholism, 44(6):555-560.

Cronise, K., *Stefanik, M., *Sethi, L.,  & *Bowen, T. (2009).   Blocking or facilitating ethanol tolerance with neurosteroids:  A means to assess the impact of tolerance on ethanol consumption in mice. Research Society on Alcoholism, 33(1):p323.

*Lee, K., *Sethi, L., *Bowen, T., *Maletsky, K., *Brown, K., *Saeed, F., & Cronise, K. (2009).   The impact of ethanol tolerance on consumption:  does tolerance provide a preference or an ability to consume ethanol?  Society for NeuroscienceAbstracts, online.

Cronise, K. &  *Gandhi, M.(2008). Co-administration of ketamine with ethanol does not alter the development of tolerance to ethanol or ethanol consumption C57BL/6J mice. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, online.

Cronise, K., *Guarnier, M., *Blackman, L., &  *Cook, A.  (2007). Ethanol tolerance may enhance ethanol consumption in a modified drinking in the dark paradigm.  Research Society on Alcoholism Abstracts, Supp. 31(6):24A.

*Sindel, C., *Blackman, L. & Cronise, K. (2006)  Expression of sensitization to the locomotor stimulating effect of ethanol is dependent on contextually conditioned cues in DBA/2J mice.  Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, online.

Cronise, K. & Crabbe, J.C. (2005).  Murine models of substance and alcohol dependence:  unraveling genetic complexities.  Computational genetics and genomics:  tools for understanding complex disease.  Peltz (Ed.), Humana Press, Inc., Totowa, NJ.

Cronise, K., Finn, D.A., Metten, P. & Crabbe, J.C. (2005).  Scheduled access to ethanol results in motor impairment and tolerance in female C57BL/6J mice.  Psychopharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior, 81:943-953. 

Finn, D.A., Belknap, J.K., Cronise, K., Yoneyama, N., Murillo, A., & Crabbe, J.C. (2005).  A procedure to produce high alcohol intake in mice.  Psychopharmacology, 178:471-480.

Kleithermes, C.L., Cronise, K. & Crabbe, J.C. (2005).  Home cage activity and ingestive behaviors in mice following chronic ethanol vapor inhalation.  Physiology and Behavior, 85:479-488.

Kleithermes, C.L., Cronise, K. & Crabbe, J.C. (2004).  Anxiety-like behavior in mice in two apparatus during withdrawal from chronic ethanol vapor inhalation. Alcoholism:  Clinical and Experimental Research, 28(7):1012-1019.

Marino M.D., Cronise K., Lugo Jr. J.N., and Kelly, S.J. (2002) Ultrasonic vocalizations and maternal-infant interactions in a rat model of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. Developmental Psychobiology, 41(4):241-351.

Lugo, Jr,. J.N., Marino, M., Cronise, K., and Kelly, S.J. (2002) Effects of alcohol exposure during development on social behavior in rats. Physiology & Behavior, 78(2):185-194.

Cronise, K., Marino, M.D., Tran, T.D. & Kelly, S.J. (2000). Critical periods for the effects of alcohol on learning in rats. Behavioral Neuroscience, 115(1):138-45.

Cronise, K. & Kelly, S.J. (2000). Maternal urinary tract infection alters water maze performance in the offspring. Neurotoxicology & Teratology, 23(4):373-9.

Department of Psychology

McCardell Bicentennial Hall
276 Bicentennial Way
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753