The 2017 Course Schedule will be available in the spring of 2017.

Schedule

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ARBC3101A-L16

CRN: 60025

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3101B-L16

CRN: 60033

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3101C-L16

CRN: 60595

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3102A-L16

CRN: 60034

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3102B-L16

CRN: 60035

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3102C-L16

CRN: 60596

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3103A-L16

CRN: 60037

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3103B-L16

CRN: 60038

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3103C-L16

CRN: 60597

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3104A-L16

CRN: 60040

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3104B-L16

CRN: 60041

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3104C-L16

CRN: 60598

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3197A-L16

CRN: 60036

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3197B-L16

CRN: 60252

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3197C-L16

CRN: 60599

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3198A-L16

CRN: 60039

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3198B-L16

CRN: 60253

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3198C-L16

CRN: 60600

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3199A-L16

CRN: 60042

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3199B-L16

CRN: 60254

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3199C-L16

CRN: 60601

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3200A-L16

CRN: 60047

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3200B-L16

CRN: 60255

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3200C-L16

CRN: 60602

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3201A-L16

CRN: 60049

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3201B-L16

CRN: 60052

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3201C-L16

CRN: 60256

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3201D-L16

CRN: 60324

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3202A-L16

CRN: 60054

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3202B-L16

CRN: 60056

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3202C-L16

CRN: 60257

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3202D-L16

CRN: 60325

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3203A-L16

CRN: 60059

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3203B-L16

CRN: 60060

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3203C-L16

CRN: 60258

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3203D-L16

CRN: 60326

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3204A-L16

CRN: 60063

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3204B-L16

CRN: 60065

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3204C-L16

CRN: 60259

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3204D-L16

CRN: 60327

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3297A-L16

CRN: 60174

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3297B-L16

CRN: 60204

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3297C-L16

CRN: 60295

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3298A-L16

CRN: 60175

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3298B-L16

CRN: 60205

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3298C-L16

CRN: 60296

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3299A-L16

CRN: 60176

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3299B-L16

CRN: 60206

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3299C-L16

CRN: 60297

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3300A-L16

CRN: 60177

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3300B-L16

CRN: 60207

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3300C-L16

CRN: 60298

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3301A-L16

CRN: 60603

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3301B-L16

CRN: 60069

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3301C-L16

CRN: 60237

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3301D-L16

CRN: 60470

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3301E-L16

CRN: 60604

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3302A-L16

CRN: 60605

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3302B-L16

CRN: 60068

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3302C-L16

CRN: 60238

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3302D-L16

CRN: 60471

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3302E-L16

CRN: 60606

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3303A-L16

CRN: 60607

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3303B-L16

CRN: 60062

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3303C-L16

CRN: 60239

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3303D-L16

CRN: 60472

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3303E-L16

CRN: 60608

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3304A-L16

CRN: 60609

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3304B-L16

CRN: 60058

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3304C-L16

CRN: 60240

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3304D-L16

CRN: 60473

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3304E-L16

CRN: 60610

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3397A-L16

CRN: 60196

High Intermediate Arabic II
This level builds on the writing and conversational skills the students already have in order to take them up to the advanced proficiency level. The students study literary discourse and news reports, along with listening to authentic interviews and talks, write lengthy assignments, and give short oral presentations. In addition, they review some advanced grammatical rules on daily basis. They also choose one of the dialects offered in the School to acquire the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in a meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Text:
/Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic/. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

Additional texts selected by the instructors

ARBC3397B-L16

CRN: 60328

High Intermediate Arabic II
This level builds on the writing and conversational skills the students already have in order to take them up to the advanced proficiency level. The students study literary discourse and news reports, along with listening to authentic interviews and talks, write lengthy assignments, and give short oral presentations. In addition, they review some advanced grammatical rules on daily basis. They also choose one of the dialects offered in the School to acquire the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in a meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Text:
/Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic/. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

Additional texts selected by the instructors

ARBC3398A-L16

CRN: 60197

High Intermediate Arabic II
This level builds on the writing and conversational skills the students already have in order to take them up to the advanced proficiency level. The students study literary discourse and news reports, along with listening to authentic interviews and talks, write lengthy assignments, and give short oral presentations. In addition, they review some advanced grammatical rules on daily basis. They also choose one of the dialects offered in the School to acquire the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in a meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Text:
/Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic/. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

Additional texts selected by the instructors

ARBC3398B-L16

CRN: 60329

High Intermediate Arabic II
This level builds on the writing and conversational skills the students already have in order to take them up to the advanced proficiency level. The students study literary discourse and news reports, along with listening to authentic interviews and talks, write lengthy assignments, and give short oral presentations. In addition, they review some advanced grammatical rules on daily basis. They also choose one of the dialects offered in the School to acquire the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in a meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Text:
/Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic/. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

Additional texts selected by the instructors

ARBC3399A-L16

CRN: 60198

High Intermediate Arabic II
This level builds on the writing and conversational skills the students already have in order to take them up to the advanced proficiency level. The students study literary discourse and news reports, along with listening to authentic interviews and talks, write lengthy assignments, and give short oral presentations. In addition, they review some advanced grammatical rules on daily basis. They also choose one of the dialects offered in the School to acquire the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in a meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Text:
/Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic/. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

Additional texts selected by the instructors

ARBC3399B-L16

CRN: 60330

High Intermediate Arabic II
This level builds on the writing and conversational skills the students already have in order to take them up to the advanced proficiency level. The students study literary discourse and news reports, along with listening to authentic interviews and talks, write lengthy assignments, and give short oral presentations. In addition, they review some advanced grammatical rules on daily basis. They also choose one of the dialects offered in the School to acquire the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in a meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Text:
/Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic/. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

Additional texts selected by the instructors

ARBC3400A-L16

CRN: 60199

High Intermediate Arabic II
This level builds on the writing and conversational skills the students already have in order to take them up to the advanced proficiency level. The students study literary discourse and news reports, along with listening to authentic interviews and talks, write lengthy assignments, and give short oral presentations. In addition, they review some advanced grammatical rules on daily basis. They also choose one of the dialects offered in the School to acquire the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in a meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Text:
/Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic/. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

Additional texts selected by the instructors

ARBC3400B-L16

CRN: 60331

High Intermediate Arabic II
This level builds on the writing and conversational skills the students already have in order to take them up to the advanced proficiency level. The students study literary discourse and news reports, along with listening to authentic interviews and talks, write lengthy assignments, and give short oral presentations. In addition, they review some advanced grammatical rules on daily basis. They also choose one of the dialects offered in the School to acquire the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in a meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Text:
/Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic/. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

Additional texts selected by the instructors

ARBC3401A-L16

CRN: 60051

Advanced Arabic I
Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (4 units)

Required Texts:
/Media Arabic/, by Elgibali et al, AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

A variety of additional texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

ARBC3401B-L16

CRN: 60487

Advanced Arabic I
Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (4 units)

Required Texts:
/Media Arabic/, by Elgibali et al, AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

A variety of additional texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

ARBC3402A-L16

CRN: 60048

Advanced Arabic I
Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (4 units)

Required Texts:
/Media Arabic/, by Elgibali et al, AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

A variety of additional texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

ARBC3402B-L16

CRN: 60488

Advanced Arabic I
Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (4 units)

Required Texts:
/Media Arabic/, by Elgibali et al, AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

A variety of additional texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

ARBC3403A-L16

CRN: 60045

Advanced Arabic I
Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (4 units)

Required Texts:
/Media Arabic/, by Elgibali et al, AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

A variety of additional texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

ARBC3403B-L16

CRN: 60489

Advanced Arabic I
Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (4 units)

Required Texts:
/Media Arabic/, by Elgibali et al, AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

A variety of additional texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

ARBC3404A-L16

CRN: 60043

Advanced Arabic I
Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (4 units)

Required Texts:
/Media Arabic/, by Elgibali et al, AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

A variety of additional texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

ARBC3404B-L16

CRN: 60490

Advanced Arabic I
Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (4 units)

Required Texts:
/Media Arabic/, by Elgibali et al, AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

A variety of additional texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

ARBC3497A-L16

CRN: 60389

Advanced Arabic II
This course helps advanced-high students refine and practice their listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students learn how to use and extend their advanced vocabulary, grammar, and communication skills more consciously and effectively. Emphasis is on speaking extemporaneously, use of idioms and special expressions, and identifying intent and emotions by recognizing tone, content, and word usage. An increased focus on reading a novel, short stories, and media analysis, along with listening to authentic interviews, debates and talks, serves as the basis for dynamic oral communicative practice. Students engage in class discussions and have the opportunity to express their opinions about contemporary issues in the Arab world. They are to write a research paper and give lengthy presentations. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
A variety of texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

ARBC3498A-L16

CRN: 60390

Advanced Arabic II
This course helps advanced-high students refine and practice their listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students learn how to use and extend their advanced vocabulary, grammar, and communication skills more consciously and effectively. Emphasis is on speaking extemporaneously, use of idioms and special expressions, and identifying intent and emotions by recognizing tone, content, and word usage. An increased focus on reading a novel, short stories, and media analysis, along with listening to authentic interviews, debates and talks, serves as the basis for dynamic oral communicative practice. Students engage in class discussions and have the opportunity to express their opinions about contemporary issues in the Arab world. They are to write a research paper and give lengthy presentations. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
A variety of texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

ARBC3499A-L16

CRN: 60391

Advanced Arabic II
This course helps advanced-high students refine and practice their listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students learn how to use and extend their advanced vocabulary, grammar, and communication skills more consciously and effectively. Emphasis is on speaking extemporaneously, use of idioms and special expressions, and identifying intent and emotions by recognizing tone, content, and word usage. An increased focus on reading a novel, short stories, and media analysis, along with listening to authentic interviews, debates and talks, serves as the basis for dynamic oral communicative practice. Students engage in class discussions and have the opportunity to express their opinions about contemporary issues in the Arab world. They are to write a research paper and give lengthy presentations. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
A variety of texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

ARBC3500A-L16

CRN: 60392

Advanced Arabic II
This course helps advanced-high students refine and practice their listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students learn how to use and extend their advanced vocabulary, grammar, and communication skills more consciously and effectively. Emphasis is on speaking extemporaneously, use of idioms and special expressions, and identifying intent and emotions by recognizing tone, content, and word usage. An increased focus on reading a novel, short stories, and media analysis, along with listening to authentic interviews, debates and talks, serves as the basis for dynamic oral communicative practice. Students engage in class discussions and have the opportunity to express their opinions about contemporary issues in the Arab world. They are to write a research paper and give lengthy presentations. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
A variety of texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

ARBC6606A-L16

CRN: 60593

Lang Attitudes & Perspectives
This course will examine “language attitudes,” or the way that people view a particular language or languages, whether their own or another, whether as a first or second language, etc. It will touch on research in the areas of sociolinguistics, second language learning and acquisition, and language cultural studies, with the goal of clarifying the terms and procedures which may be useful in determining the language attitudes of individuals, groups, and societies, and will consider the implications of such research for foreign language teachers.

ARBC6609A-L16

CRN: 60476

Dialect Acquisition &Variation
Dialect Acquisition and Arabic Dialect Variation

This course will introduce the students to the theoretical and practical basics of studying the Arabic dialects and its social and geographical variation. Through the reading of a variety of articles and studies that examine the status of Arabic regional dialects, students will not only develop an understanding of main issues in conducting fieldwork research in the area study of dialectology, but they will also gain knowledge and understand the different linguistic structures of various Arabic dialects and the use of colloquial language in Arab mass media. The course mainly focuses on the pedagogical aspect of the learning and teaching of colloquial language and its integration in the Arabic language curriculum. Examples from daily life situations and transcribed data from interviews and talk shows either conducted by the students or recorded through the media will be discussed and analyzed. Students are also required to design sample lesson plans which highlights the learning of dialects in the Arabic language classroom.

ARBC6675A-L16

CRN: 60474

Cinema East & West
Cultural Topics in Arabic: Cinema East & West

This course will examine the role that cinema has played in the cultural politics of both the Arab World as well as the West (Europe and America). Through a careful and critical viewing of a wide variety of cinematic texts/films from a wide variety of traditions (Hollywood, popular Egyptian, Arab “art films”, European), students enrolled in this course will explore such notions as genre, gender, the role of the audience, identification potential, popular vs. art films, dominance of Hollywood, globalization effects, among other issues. The course will review the role that such cinematic works have played in cross-cultural representation, understanding and misunderstanding, as well as reflecting issues of modernity and the modern.

ARBC6694A-L16

CRN: 60594

Assessmt Foreign Lang Classrm
Assessment in Foreign Language Classroom

The course will introduce students to the theoretical issues of testing, assessment and evaluation in the field of foreign language classroom. Students will also be exposed to valid and reliable assessment tools in task, content, and performance-based foreign language classrooms. The course will expose students to basic statistical procedures used in measuring the validity and reliability of tests. Students will explore the different types of tests created for the different skill areas of foreign language teaching.

ARBC6696A-L16

CRN: 60592

Issues Teach/Learn ARBC 2nd/FL
Seminar on Issues on Teaching and Learning Arabic as a Second/and Foreign Language

The course aims to familiarize (Teaching Arabic as a Foreign language: TAFL) students with the theoretical, research and instructional issues that occupy practitioners and explore approaches that support learning of Arabic as a second/foreign language. The course will gain in-depth knowledge through focusing on one particular topic within one of the three areas of theory, research and instruction. A project will be developed in consultation with the professor, presented to the class, and prepare it as a final paper. Possible areas include theoretical as well as practical issues that arise from discussing the following themes such as the history of the teaching of Arabic language, the contexts in which the teaching occurs, Arabic learners’ motivations, the testing and assessment in Arabic, the development of teaching materials and second language acquisition. The course will also address the role of feedback and interaction with the classroom, and advanced learning in Arabic.

ARBC6698A-L16

CRN: 60395

Language Practicum
This is a one unit course which is designed to give graduate students an opportunity to reflect on Arabic pedagogical theories and become familiar with a range of teaching strategies and techniques. The course includes class observation, lesson planning, a micro-teaching component and actual teaching demonstrations of the language skills. Students are required to conduct interviews with professional instructors during which they discuss the best practices as well as problems encountered in teaching the beginning, intermediate and advanced college level Arabic classes. To address the linguistic phenomenon of diglossia, students will practice teaching Arab dialect(s) alongside the formal varieties of the language. The course is offer in the last summer session towards the completion of the Master’s degree.

The Arabic School

Sunderland Language Center
Middlebury College
P: 802.443.5230
F: 802.443.2075

Mailing address
Arabic School
14 Old Chapel Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT  05753

Barbara Walter, Coordinator
arabicschool@middlebury.edu