Schedule

« Spring 2017 Summer 2017 Language Schools

ARBC3101A-L17

CRN: 60025

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3101B-L17

CRN: 60033

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3101C-L17

CRN: 60482

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3102A-L17

CRN: 60034

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3102B-L17

CRN: 60035

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3102C-L17

CRN: 60483

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3103A-L17

CRN: 60037

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3103B-L17

CRN: 60038

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3103C-L17

CRN: 60484

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3104A-L17

CRN: 60040

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3104B-L17

CRN: 60041

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3104C-L17

CRN: 60485

Elementary Arabic
The beginning level is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. During the first week, elementary level students sign a modified pledge allowing them to interact with their instructor in English while in class. In all other aspects of their daily life in the school, beginning level students abide by the full Language Pledge. From the first day of classes, students are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials. They engage in functional activities, often in small groups, necessary to their survival in the school community and later on in an Arab setting. Students at the elementary level are introduced to the use of Arabic computer software and to listening materials in digitized form and on the Internet. Reading assignments from Arabic sources on the Internet are also a feature of this level. Students write long compositions and make oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process and helps students at this level blend in with students from higher levels. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Alif Baa: An Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds/, Third Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2010. ISBN 9781589016323

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3197A-L17

CRN: 60036

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3197B-L17

CRN: 60246

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3197C-L17

CRN: 60486

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3198A-L17

CRN: 60039

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3198B-L17

CRN: 60247

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3198C-L17

CRN: 60487

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3199A-L17

CRN: 60042

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3199B-L17

CRN: 60248

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3199C-L17

CRN: 60488

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3200A-L17

CRN: 60047

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3200B-L17

CRN: 60249

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3200C-L17

CRN: 60489

High Elementary Arabic
This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic/, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

ARBC3201A-L17

CRN: 60049

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3201B-L17

CRN: 60052

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3201C-L17

CRN: 60250

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3201D-L17

CRN: 60303

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3201E-L17

CRN: 60593

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3202A-L17

CRN: 60054

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3202B-L17

CRN: 60056

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3202C-L17

CRN: 60251

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3202D-L17

CRN: 60304

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3202E-L17

CRN: 60594

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3203A-L17

CRN: 60059

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3203B-L17

CRN: 60060

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3203C-L17

CRN: 60252

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3203D-L17

CRN: 60305

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3203E-L17

CRN: 60595

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3204A-L17

CRN: 60063

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3204B-L17

CRN: 60065

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3204C-L17

CRN: 60253

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3204D-L17

CRN: 60306

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3204E-L17

CRN: 60596

Intermediate Arabic
Students placed in Level 2 normally have taken two or three semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and have knowledge of the basic grammatical and lexical features of Arabic. Sometimes a "lower intermediate" class is created to accommodate those students whose proficiency and language skills require that they go at a slower speed than regular intermediate students. Typically, students in the lower intermediate class have finished only two semesters of college Arabic, or more than two semesters but have been away from the language for some time. The objectives of Intermediate Arabic are, in general, to solidify knowledge of the basic rules of Arabic grammar, to expand vocabulary in terms of complexity, and to increase the acquisition of words for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of authentic reading and listening materials, and on communicative writing and speaking tasks. Students at the intermediate level are required to go to all Arabic lectures and movies. Usually, there are homework assignments designed to enhance each student's benefit from the cultural activities. At the end of the course, students at the intermediate level are expected to write a long composition of at least 1,200 words. Oral presentations of 15 to 20 minutes are regular activities at this level. In addition, work outside of class requires an average of four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/, by Brustad, Al-Batal and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition, by Brustad, Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 2006.

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

ARBC3297A-L17

CRN: 60171

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3297B-L17

CRN: 60201

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3297C-L17

CRN: 60286

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3298A-L17

CRN: 60172

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3298B-L17

CRN: 60202

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3298C-L17

CRN: 60287

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3299A-L17

CRN: 60173

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3299B-L17

CRN: 60203

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3299C-L17

CRN: 60288

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3300A-L17

CRN: 60174

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3300B-L17

CRN: 60204

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3300C-L17

CRN: 60289

Intermediate Arabic II
This course enables students at the intermediate proficiency level to further strengthen the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic and to understand key aspects of the Arab world and the Arab culture. Typically, students in this level have finished three or four semesters of Arabic. Students will acquire a broad range of intermediate level vocabulary, learn higher level rules of Arabic grammar, and increase the acquisition of phrases for active use in a wide variety of topics and settings. Students write lengthy paragraphs in their daily assignments and give oral presentations in class in a way that makes the use of Arabic a natural process. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
/Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition/. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

ARBC3301A-L17

CRN: 60490

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3301B-L17

CRN: 60069

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3301C-L17

CRN: 60233

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3301D-L17

CRN: 60387

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3301E-L17

CRN: 60491

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3302A-L17

CRN: 60492

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3302B-L17

CRN: 60068

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3302C-L17

CRN: 60234

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3302D-L17

CRN: 60388

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3302E-L17

CRN: 60493

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3303A-L17

CRN: 60494

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3303B-L17

CRN: 60062

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3303C-L17

CRN: 60235

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3303D-L17

CRN: 60389

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3303E-L17

CRN: 60495

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3304A-L17

CRN: 60496

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3304B-L17

CRN: 60058

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3304C-L17

CRN: 60236

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3304D-L17

CRN: 60390

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3304E-L17

CRN: 60497

High Intermediate Arabic
Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547
Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

ARBC3397A-L17

CRN: 60193

High Intermediate Arabic II
This level builds on the writing and conversational skills the students already have in order to take them up to the advanced proficiency level. The students study literary discourse and news reports, along with listening to authentic interviews and talks, write lengthy assignments, and give short oral presentations. In addition, they review some advanced grammatical rules on daily basis. They also choose one of the dialects offered in the School to acquire the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in a meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Text:
/Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic/. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

Additional texts selected by the instructors

ARBC3397B-L17

CRN: 60307

High Intermediate Arabic II
This level builds on the writing and conversational skills the students already have in order to take them up to the advanced proficiency level. The students study literary discourse and news reports, along with listening to authentic interviews and talks, write lengthy assignments, and give short oral presentations. In addition, they review some advanced grammatical rules on daily basis. They also choose one of the dialects offered in the School to acquire the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in a meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Text:
/Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic/. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

Additional texts selected by the instructors

ARBC3398A-L17

CRN: 60194

High Intermediate Arabic II
This level builds on the writing and conversational skills the students already have in order to take them up to the advanced proficiency level. The students study literary discourse and news reports, along with listening to authentic interviews and talks, write lengthy assignments, and give short oral presentations. In addition, they review some advanced grammatical rules on daily basis. They also choose one of the dialects offered in the School to acquire the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in a meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Text:
/Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic/. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

Additional texts selected by the instructors

ARBC3398B-L17

CRN: 60308

High Intermediate Arabic II
This level builds on the writing and conversational skills the students already have in order to take them up to the advanced proficiency level. The students study literary discourse and news reports, along with listening to authentic interviews and talks, write lengthy assignments, and give short oral presentations. In addition, they review some advanced grammatical rules on daily basis. They also choose one of the dialects offered in the School to acquire the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in a meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Text:
/Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic/. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

Additional texts selected by the instructors

ARBC3399A-L17

CRN: 60195

High Intermediate Arabic II
This level builds on the writing and conversational skills the students already have in order to take them up to the advanced proficiency level. The students study literary discourse and news reports, along with listening to authentic interviews and talks, write lengthy assignments, and give short oral presentations. In addition, they review some advanced grammatical rules on daily basis. They also choose one of the dialects offered in the School to acquire the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in a meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Text:
/Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic/. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

Additional texts selected by the instructors

ARBC3399B-L17

CRN: 60309

High Intermediate Arabic II
This level builds on the writing and conversational skills the students already have in order to take them up to the advanced proficiency level. The students study literary discourse and news reports, along with listening to authentic interviews and talks, write lengthy assignments, and give short oral presentations. In addition, they review some advanced grammatical rules on daily basis. They also choose one of the dialects offered in the School to acquire the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in a meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Text:
/Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic/. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

Additional texts selected by the instructors

ARBC3400A-L17

CRN: 60196

High Intermediate Arabic II
This level builds on the writing and conversational skills the students already have in order to take them up to the advanced proficiency level. The students study literary discourse and news reports, along with listening to authentic interviews and talks, write lengthy assignments, and give short oral presentations. In addition, they review some advanced grammatical rules on daily basis. They also choose one of the dialects offered in the School to acquire the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in a meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Text:
/Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic/. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

Additional texts selected by the instructors

ARBC3400B-L17

CRN: 60310

High Intermediate Arabic II
This level builds on the writing and conversational skills the students already have in order to take them up to the advanced proficiency level. The students study literary discourse and news reports, along with listening to authentic interviews and talks, write lengthy assignments, and give short oral presentations. In addition, they review some advanced grammatical rules on daily basis. They also choose one of the dialects offered in the School to acquire the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in a meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Text:
/Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic/. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

Additional texts selected by the instructors

ARBC3401A-L17

CRN: 60051

Advanced Arabic I
Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (4 units)

Required Texts:
/Media Arabic/, by Elgibali et al, AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

A variety of additional texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

ARBC3401B-L17

CRN: 60398

Advanced Arabic I
Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (4 units)

Required Texts:
/Media Arabic/, by Elgibali et al, AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

A variety of additional texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

ARBC3402A-L17

CRN: 60048

Advanced Arabic I
Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (4 units)

Required Texts:
/Media Arabic/, by Elgibali et al, AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

A variety of additional texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

ARBC3402B-L17

CRN: 60399

Advanced Arabic I
Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (4 units)

Required Texts:
/Media Arabic/, by Elgibali et al, AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

A variety of additional texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

ARBC3403A-L17

CRN: 60045

Advanced Arabic I
Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (4 units)

Required Texts:
/Media Arabic/, by Elgibali et al, AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

A variety of additional texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

ARBC3403B-L17

CRN: 60400

Advanced Arabic I
Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (4 units)

Required Texts:
/Media Arabic/, by Elgibali et al, AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

A variety of additional texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

ARBC3404A-L17

CRN: 60043

Advanced Arabic I
Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (4 units)

Required Texts:
/Media Arabic/, by Elgibali et al, AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

A variety of additional texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

ARBC3404B-L17

CRN: 60401

Advanced Arabic I
Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (4 units)

Required Texts:
/Media Arabic/, by Elgibali et al, AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

A variety of additional texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

ARBC6613A-L17

CRN: 60591

Themes in Lit & Lang Pedagogy
Themes in Arabic Literature and language Pedagogy

This course will provide an overview of a wide range of literary genres from the Arabic literary canon, and will include texts drawn from both the Arabo-Islamic tradition (al-turaath or “cultural heritage” texts), as well as from the modern period. The starting point for discussion will include some recurrent themes found in the Arabic literary tradition (such as “loss,” “memory,” and “desire”), and will include additional discussion on ways of integrating literary works into language pedagogy at various levels. Through a careful reading of a wide variety of texts, students in this course will develop both an appreciation of some canonical works in the Arabic tradition, as well as an understanding of how they might be used to impart cultural and aesthetic awareness in the L2 classroom.

ARBC6616A-L17

CRN: 60592

Arab Sociolinguistics
Arabic Sociolinguistics focuses on the various aspects of human behavior that influence language use, learning and acquisition. Inter-relationships between language use and the social contexts that shape it will be examined. Topics of Arabic sociolinguistics that will be discussed include diglossia and the dichotomy between Modern Standard Arabic and the dialeccts, code-switching, gendered discourse and language identity, geographical and social variation, language education, language policy and politics. Students will read articles, and case studies that manifest language use on the various aspects of these topics and will be required to reflect on such readings in writing and orally drawing on their personal experiences and how these topics function within their own communities in comparison to what is prevalent in Arab societies.

ARBC6617A-L17

CRN: 60597

Classical Arabic Prose
This course is an in-depth study of classical Arabic prose. It will focus on central questions involved in the interpretation of classical Arabic prose, in addition to key authors such as Ibn al-Muqaffa, Al-Jahiz and Al Tawhidi and the significance of their works.
At the end of the course, students will be familiar with the history, development, and critical assessment of classical Arabic prose. Students will read and analyze literary texts of various genres -- including Maqama, Khutbah, Amthal, and Risala -- and hone their ability to comment on both the literary and the historical, cultural, and political dimensions represented in these texts.

ARBC6670A-L17

CRN: 60600

Contemporary Arab Society
Contemporary Arab Society

This course aims at introducing an analysis of the contemporary Arab society to deepen the students’ understanding of the Arab World. Topics include the Arab identity, role and status of women, socio-economic aspects, role of religion, Islamist movements, changes that took place after the Arab spring. The course will feature group discussions, debates, presentations, and reflection papers. Students will also read articles and book chapters as well as watch and discuss documentaries and media coverage of the recent events in Middle East and North Africa

ARBC6675A-L17

CRN: 60391

Cinema East & West
Cultural Topics in Arabic: Cinema East & West

This course will examine the role that cinema has played in the cultural politics of both the Arab World as well as the West (Europe and America). Through a careful and critical viewing of a wide variety of cinematic texts/films from a wide variety of traditions (Hollywood, popular Egyptian, Arab “art films”, European), students enrolled in this course will explore such notions as genre, gender, the role of the audience, identification potential, popular vs. art films, dominance of Hollywood, globalization effects, among other issues. The course will review the role that such cinematic works have played in cross-cultural representation, understanding and misunderstanding, as well as reflecting issues of modernity and the modern.

ARBC6694A-L17

CRN: 60481

Assessmt Foreign Lang Classrm
Assessment in Foreign Language Classroom

The course will introduce students to the theoretical issues of testing, assessment and evaluation in the field of foreign language classroom. Students will also be exposed to valid and reliable assessment tools in task, content, and performance-based foreign language classrooms. The course will expose students to basic statistical procedures used in measuring the validity and reliability of tests. Students will explore the different types of tests created for the different skill areas of foreign language teaching.

ARBC6698A-L17

CRN: 60355

Language Practicum
This is a one unit course which is designed to give graduate students an opportunity to reflect on Arabic pedagogical theories and become familiar with a range of teaching strategies and techniques. The course includes class observation, lesson planning, a micro-teaching component and actual teaching demonstrations of the language skills. Students are required to conduct interviews with professional instructors during which they discuss the best practices as well as problems encountered in teaching the beginning, intermediate and advanced college level Arabic classes. To address the linguistic phenomenon of diglossia, students will practice teaching Arab dialect(s) alongside the formal varieties of the language. The course is offer in the last summer session towards the completion of the Master’s degree.

The Arabic School

Sunderland Language Center
Middlebury College
P: 802.443.5230
F: 802.443.2075

Mailing address
Arabic School
14 Old Chapel Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT  05753

Barbara Walter, Coordinator
arabicschool@middlebury.edu