Middlebury Language Schools. 100 years of Language.

Ahmad Sharafeldin

Faculty

 
 work802.443.5230

Dr. Ahmad Abdel Tawwab Sharaf Eldin earned a BA in Simultaneous Interpretation, and both MA and PhD degrees in Linguistics. While his MA handles the power of humor in interpreting meaning in visual discourse, his PhD covers the notion of language, power, and ideology, and its relation with racism in critical discourse analysis. Dr. Sharaf Eldin obtained a Fulbright Grant to teach and study at State University of New York.

Dr. Sharaf Eldin has taught the Arabic and English languages at universities in Egypt and the United States. His previous post was as visiting assistant professor of Arabic Language at the College of William and Mary. In addition, he taught at the American University in Cairo and Amideast. He worked as a television presenter in English language for teaching Arabic for non-Arabic speaker. He is also working as a professional simultaneous interpreter from Arabic into English and vice versa in international conferences in Turkey.

He has published two books about the relationship between language, political cartoons, and ideology. Dr. Ahmad's current research covers the area of religious discourse, meaning and pragmatics, language and culture. He was recently appointed as a new Lecturer of Arabic Language and Culture, at the University of Dayton in Ohio, to begin in the fall of 2014.

 

Courses

Course List: 

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

ARBC 3197 - High Elementary Arabic      

This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

Summer 2014 Language Schools

More Information »

ARBC 3198 - High Elementary Arabic      

This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

Summer 2014 Language Schools

More Information »

ARBC 3199 - High Elementary Arabic      

This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

Summer 2014 Language Schools

More Information »

ARBC 3200 - High Elementary Arabic      

This course of study is designed for students who have had some exposure to Arabic through an academic institution, through living for a period of time in an Arab country, or through private tutoring in the language. Students at this level typically come from different backgrounds, have studied using different textbooks, and have different levels of proficiency. Students are expected to use Arabic exclusively from the outset and all instruction is conducted in Arabic. Students in this level are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Level 1. The speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than Level 1 assignments. Students at this level are required to write and edit their compositions using Arabic word-processing software available at the School, in addition to other technological features such as digitized sound for Al-Kitaab lessons and reading and listening assignments from the Internet. Students are expected to spend between four and five hours a day outside of class working on assignments and preparing for next day's class. (1 unit)

Required Texts:
Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part I, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2004. ISBN 9781589011045

Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya, Part II, Second Edition. Brustad et al. Georgetown University Press, 2006. ISBN 9781589010963

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic. Spoken Languages Services. ISBN 9780879500030

Summer 2014 Language Schools

More Information »

ARBC 3301 - High Intermediate Arabic      

Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2007. ISBN 9789774161087

Summer 2015 Language Schools

More Information »

ARBC 3302 - High Intermediate Arabic      

Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2007. ISBN 9789774161087

Summer 2015 Language Schools

More Information »

ARBC 3303 - High Intermediate Arabic      

Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2007. ISBN 9789774161087

Summer 2015 Language Schools

More Information »

ARBC 3304 - High Intermediate Arabic      

Students at this level have a broader range of vocabulary, more fluency in speaking, and more advanced skills in Arabic than students at the regular Intermediate Arabic level. The main objective of this course is to move students in a short period of time across the threshold of the high intermediate level of proficiency and provide opportunities and learning strategies towards the advanced level of proficiency. This level is characterized by extensive readings and discussions on a multitude of political, social, cultural, and literary topics. Writing assignments are geared toward stylistic and aesthetic aspects of the Arabic language. Students produce lengthy expository and argumentative discourse. Attending lectures and films and participating in follow-up discussion sessions either with their instructor or the visiting lecturer are regular features of class activities. Listening activities focus on authentic materials of considerable length and content. At this level, students choose one of the colloquial dialects offered in the School. The objective is to equip students with the necessary conversational skills that would enable them to engage in meaningful discourse with educated Arabs in a medium that is not considered artificial or unfamiliar in the Arab World. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (1 unit)

Required Texts:

Connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. Al-Warraki et al. AUC Press, 1994. ISBN 9789774243547

Media Arabic. Elgibali et al. AUC Press, 2007. ISBN 9789774161087

Summer 2015 Language Schools

More Information »

The Arabic School

Sunderland Language Center
Middlebury College
P: 802.443.5230
F: 802.443.2075

Mailing address
Arabic School
14 Old Chapel Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT  05753

Barbara Walter, Coordinator
arabicschool@middlebury.edu