Abdulkareem Said Ramadan

Faculty

Abdulkareem Said Ramadan earned his Ph.D. in Arabic and Applied Linguistics at the University of Damascus where he also earned an M.A. in Arabic Syntax and Morphology and a B.A. in Arabic Language and Literature. Abdulkareem has taught Arabic at the French Institute for the Middle East (IFEAD), the British Council, and the Arabic Department at the University of Damascus. He was the coordinator of the Arabic program at the Arabic Language Center at the University of Damascus, where he taught Arabic as a Second Language. He began teaching at the Middlebury College Arabic School in 2006 and also taught at Washington University in St. Louis and at the University of Virginia, where he coordinated the Arabic program. He is now an assistant professor at Gettysburg College. His research interests include sociolinguistics and foreign language education.

 

Courses

Course List: 

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

ARBC 3401 - Advanced Arabic I      

Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (4 units)

Required Texts:
/Media Arabic/, by Elgibali et al, AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

A variety of additional texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

Summer 2016 Language Schools, Mills 8 Week Session

More Information »

ARBC 3402 - Advanced Arabic I      

Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (4 units)

Required Texts:
/Media Arabic/, by Elgibali et al, AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

A variety of additional texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

Summer 2016 Language Schools, Mills 8 Week Session

More Information »

ARBC 3403 - Advanced Arabic I      

Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (4 units)

Required Texts:
/Media Arabic/, by Elgibali et al, AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

A variety of additional texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

Summer 2016 Language Schools, Mills 8 Week Session

More Information »

ARBC 3404 - Advanced Arabic I      

Students accepted at this level are expected to have mastered language mechanics and possess the high intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed to enable students to attain solid, advanced level proficiency or higher in the various language skills. Readings at this level are extensive and varied in terms of genres and academic interests. They consist exclusively of authentic materials on various contemporary and classical topics in language, literature, and the social sciences. Chapters from books, novels, and lengthy articles form the backbone of this course. Students analyze the stylistic features of different genres and texts. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the nuances of the language and the use of idiomatic expressions and rhetorical devices. Home assignments are varied and typically consist of attending or watching a recording of a lecture, reading a chapter from a book and making an oral presentation in class based on that reading, engaging in a panel discussion with other classmates and one or more of the other instructors in the School, or watching a live TV broadcast (via satellite) of a cultural, historical, political, or religious nature. At the advanced level, students also study the basic structures and phonological system of one of the major colloquial dialects. Students are encouraged to adopt the same linguistic medium that intellectual and educated native speakers of Arabic adopt in their conversations on academic topics. The study of the dialect is uniquely integrated into the general curriculum emphasizing the linguistic realities in the Arab World. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day. (4 units)

Required Texts:
/Media Arabic/, by Elgibali et al, AUC Press, 2014. ISBN 9789774166525

The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Spoken Languages Services.

A variety of additional texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

Summer 2016 Language Schools, Mills 8 Week Session

More Information »

ARBC 3497 - Advanced Arabic II      

This course helps advanced-high students refine and practice their listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students learn how to use and extend their advanced vocabulary, grammar, and communication skills more consciously and effectively. Emphasis is on speaking extemporaneously, use of idioms and special expressions, and identifying intent and emotions by recognizing tone, content, and word usage. An increased focus on reading a novel, short stories, and media analysis, along with listening to authentic interviews, debates and talks, serves as the basis for dynamic oral communicative practice. Students engage in class discussions and have the opportunity to express their opinions about contemporary issues in the Arab world. They are to write a research paper and give lengthy presentations. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
A variety of texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

Summer 2015 Language Schools, Mills 8 Week Session

More Information »

ARBC 3498 - Advanced Arabic II      

This course helps advanced-high students refine and practice their listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students learn how to use and extend their advanced vocabulary, grammar, and communication skills more consciously and effectively. Emphasis is on speaking extemporaneously, use of idioms and special expressions, and identifying intent and emotions by recognizing tone, content, and word usage. An increased focus on reading a novel, short stories, and media analysis, along with listening to authentic interviews, debates and talks, serves as the basis for dynamic oral communicative practice. Students engage in class discussions and have the opportunity to express their opinions about contemporary issues in the Arab world. They are to write a research paper and give lengthy presentations. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
A variety of texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

Summer 2015 Language Schools, Mills 8 Week Session

More Information »

ARBC 3499 - Advanced Arabic II      

This course helps advanced-high students refine and practice their listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students learn how to use and extend their advanced vocabulary, grammar, and communication skills more consciously and effectively. Emphasis is on speaking extemporaneously, use of idioms and special expressions, and identifying intent and emotions by recognizing tone, content, and word usage. An increased focus on reading a novel, short stories, and media analysis, along with listening to authentic interviews, debates and talks, serves as the basis for dynamic oral communicative practice. Students engage in class discussions and have the opportunity to express their opinions about contemporary issues in the Arab world. They are to write a research paper and give lengthy presentations. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
A variety of texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

Summer 2015 Language Schools, Mills 8 Week Session

More Information »

ARBC 3500 - Advanced Arabic II      

This course helps advanced-high students refine and practice their listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students learn how to use and extend their advanced vocabulary, grammar, and communication skills more consciously and effectively. Emphasis is on speaking extemporaneously, use of idioms and special expressions, and identifying intent and emotions by recognizing tone, content, and word usage. An increased focus on reading a novel, short stories, and media analysis, along with listening to authentic interviews, debates and talks, serves as the basis for dynamic oral communicative practice. Students engage in class discussions and have the opportunity to express their opinions about contemporary issues in the Arab world. They are to write a research paper and give lengthy presentations. Work outside of class requires between four to five hours a day.

Required Texts:
A variety of texts selected by the instructors, including novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.

Summer 2015 Language Schools, Mills 8 Week Session

More Information »

ARBC 6603 - Advanced Grammar      

This course provides a review of both essential and key points of the grammatical structural features of Arabic. It is designed to review and build upon students' grammatical command of Arabic structures to enhance their performance on both writing and speaking. In this course, students will develop an understanding of which grammar structures are more sophisticated and apply them to their writing and speaking. Emphasis is placed on active production and error analysis. Linguistics

Summer 2018 Language Schools, Mills 6 Week Session

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ARBC 6604 - Academic Writing      

In this course, students will develop writing knowledge, skills, and strategies that are essential for improving academic writing in Arabic. The course will cover a wide range of texts including paragraphs, essays, summaries, response assignments, research papers, proposals, reports and principles of punctuation. Students will follow the steps of writing including data collection, analysis, interpretation, and evaluation, as well as composing and revising their writing through multiple drafts. Linguistics

Summer 2018 Language Schools, Mills 6 Week Session

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ARBC 6617 - Classical Arabic Prose      

This course is an in-depth study of classical Arabic prose. It will focus on central questions involved in the interpretation of classical Arabic prose, in addition to key authors such as Ibn al-Muqaffa, Al-Jahiz and Al Tawhidi and the significance of their works.
At the end of the course, students will be familiar with the history, development, and critical assessment of classical Arabic prose. Students will read and analyze literary texts of various genres -- including Maqama, Khutbah, Amthal, and Risala -- and hone their ability to comment on both the literary and the historical, cultural, and political dimensions represented in these texts. Literature

Summer 2017 Language Schools, Mills 6 Week Session

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The Arabic School

Eman Hayyat, Coordinator arabicschool@middlebury.edu

P: 802.443.5230
F: 802.443.2075

Mailing address
Arabic School
14 Old Chapel Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT  05753