midd.data hosts speakers and panels throughout the year as a way to build community, learn from one another, and to build connections to the exciting worlds of digital humanities and data science. 

If you have an idea for a speaker or a panel, let us know by sending us an email . 

Upcoming Events

March 11, 2021

Niwaeli Kimambo: Data Literacy through Geography  

Zoom Meeting

Geographers recognize that many social and environmental problems are place-specific. For example: exposure to climate change risks or access to greenspace depend on where you live. In this talk, I will highlight how training in Geography exemplifies MiddData goals of data literacy in a liberal arts setting. Our geography students receive holistic data literacy training that links theoretical and technical knowledge. Using examples from recent class exercises, I will discuss how we prepare students to be versatile and data-driven problem solvers of our world’s pressing challenges. 


After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.
 

March 25, 2021

Genie Giaimo: Writing Centers as Data Repositories and Research Sites  

Zoom Meeting

Writing centers are complicated spaces masquerading as simple ones. Over the past century, they have developed and adapted on many occasions to fit educational trends and the changing makeup of higher education. They have changed from faculty-led instructional spaces to peer educational ones. Writing centers are currently transforming, once again, into peer-focused and professional spaces where empirical research—frequently interdisciplinary and student led—takes place. This talk will showcase part of the new and developing research program at the Middlebury Writing Center.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

April 22, 2021

Lisa Gates, Phil Murphy, and Netta Avineri: The Middlebury Social Science Research Modules Project  

Zoom Meeting

The Online Survey Research Module is the first educational resource developed as part of the larger Middlebury Social Science Research Modules (MSSRM) project. Ideally, this project will continue to grow into a set of interlinking modules that will guide a user through the entire research process, a wide variety of data collection methods, and the analyses that accompany them. We will highlight the vision, scope, and structure for the Social Science Research Modules project and the cross-institutional collaborative process of working remotely with students and faculty from MIIS and Middlebury. 
Links to videos that provide a brief overview of the Social Science Research Modules project will be shared as well.
 

May 6, 2021

Amanda Crocker  

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.
 

May 10, 2021

Miriam Posner: Data and the Humanities  

Zoom

Miriam Posner will give a talk on the fraught relationship of the humanities to thinking about their work as “data work.”

May 20, 2021

Sayaka Abe (Japanese Studies), David Allen (Biology), Carrie Anderson (History of Art and Architecture), Alex Lyford (Mathematics), Caitlin Myers (Economics): Data Science Across Disciplines: A Teaching Adventure in Five Acts  

This year five faculty colleagues from Math, Art History, Biology, Economics, and Japanese designed and piloted a new winter-term course blending a traditional introduction to data science with immersive project-based applications across four disciplines. Students with no prior data science experience spent their mornings learning how to use the statistical software package R to wrangle and extract meaning from data, and their afternoons critically applying these skills to research projects on topics ranging from seventeenth-century Dutch art to tick-borne disease to Japanese pop culture to abortion policy. Join the faculty and students from this course to hear about their experiences and findings, and to discuss broader implications for providing all students equitable and inspiring access to data and digital tools. 

PAST EVENTS

February 9, 2021

Benjy Renton (‘21): Accessing, Visualizing, and Communicating Open COVID-19 Data  

Zoom Meeting

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought a proliferation of datasets for public consumption, analysis and dissemination. At the beginning of the pandemic, the lack of a national dataset for key metrics led to the rise of open-source efforts such as the COVID Tracking Project and individual media outlets’ tracking datasets. In this talk, I will describe how I have accessed these datasets to publish visualizations key to understanding national and regional trends. Using crowdsourced projects and scientific examples, we will explore ways to effectively communicate concepts and help a wider (non-scientific) audience make sense of pandemic statistics.

January 28, 2021

John Foley, Computer Science: Working with Text Data: Automatically Extracting Poetry from Scanned Books & Gyula Zsombok, French and Francophone Studies: Language Ideologies and How People Perceive Them Online  

zoom

Working with Text Data: Automatically Extracting Poetry from Scanned Books
John Foley is an Assistant Professor in Computer Science who studies computational methods for understanding and organizing noisy text data. In this lightning talk, he will introduce his research area, discuss how poetry was collected from digitally scanned books, and talk about some ongoing work in understanding allusion in literary texts. The poetry project and dataset live at: https://poetry.jjfoley.me/

Language Ideologies and How People Perceive Them Online
Gyula Zsombok, French and Francophone Studies
This talk will present some research directions and methodologies focusing on the representation of language ideologies online and how language users perceive these ideologies. The area of study is French, considered one of the most regulated European languages that is supervised by the Académie française and the Office québecois de la langue française. While these institutions possess significant power over linguistic standards, often supported by legislation in France and Québec, the question remains whether speakers actually comply with these standards, and how/what they think about them. This research emphasizes lexical innovations (borrowings, new words, internal creations) and gender-inclusive language (neutral forms, pronouns), with textual sources such as social media data, web page scraping, newspaper articles that are processed and analyzed via statistical and topic models. The goal of this talk is to demonstrate accessible tools that could be used for a variety of research topics in the digital humanities.
 

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