Middlebury

 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

BIOL 0140 - Ecology and Evolution      

Ecology and Evolution
In this introduction to ecology and evolutionary biology we will cover the topics of interspecific interactions (competition, predation, mutualism), demography and life-history patterns, succession and disturbance in natural communities, species diversity, stability and complexity, causes of evolutionary change, speciation, phylogenetic reconstruction, and population genetics. The laboratory component will examine lecture topics in detail (such as measuring the evolutionary response of bacteria, adaptations of stream invertebrates to life in moving water, invasive species and their patterns of spread). We will emphasize experimental design, data collection in the field and in the laboratory, data analysis, and writing skills. This course is not open to seniors and second semester juniors in the Fall. 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. lab

DED SCI

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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BIOL 0145 - Cell Biology and Genetics      

Cell Biology and Genetics
In this introduction to modern cellular, genetic, and molecular biology we will explore life science concepts with an emphasis on their integral nature and evolutionary relationships. Topics covered will include cell membrane structure and function, metabolism, cell motility and division, genome structure and replication, the regulation of gene expression and protein production, genotype to phenotype relationship, and basic principles of inheritance. Major concepts will be illustrated using a broad range of examples from plants, animals, and microorganisms. Current topics in biology will be integrated into the course as they arise. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

DED SCI

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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BIOL 0201 - Invertebrate Biology      

Invertebrate Biology
The study of invertebrate animals, which comprise more than 90 percent of all animal species and represent the most diverse approaches to life on earth. A wide variety of protozoans cnidarians, echinoderms, mollusks, crustaceans, arachnids and insects are examined. Animals are studied primarily in the field for the first half of the course and the lab in the second. Emphasis is upon their ecology, evolution, behavior, and taxonomy. Specialized topics include regeneration, parasitology, sociality, and adaptations to freshwater, marine, and terrestrial habitats. Oral, written, and independent projects are required. (BIOL 0140) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

SCI

Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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BIOL 0202 - Comparative Vertebrate Biology      

Comparative Vertebrate Biology
This course will explore the evolution of the vertebrate classes and the adaptations that allow them to live in almost every habitat on Earth. We will study the phylogeny, anatomy, physiology, and ecology of the major extinct and extant taxa of vertebrates and discuss how each group solves the problems of finding food, finding mates, and avoiding predators. Laboratory exercises will focus on the comparative anatomy of a cartilaginous fish (the dogfish shark) and a mammal (the cat). Students will learn to identify the anatomical structures of the vertebrate body and observe the evolutionary homologies. Occasional field trips will introduce the local vertebrate fauna in their natural habitat. (BIOL 0140 or BIOL 0145) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

SCI

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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BIOL 0203 - Biology of Plants      

Biology of Plants
An introduction to plants, their life cycles, and their relationships to each other, as well as to the animals that pollinate them, disperse their fruits, and eat them. We will discuss morphology, physiology, evolution, and natural history of plants (mosses, ferns, gymnosperms, angiosperms). The laboratory will emphasize plant identification, various aspects of plant ecology and physiology, plant morphology, and plant use by humans. Students will complete a Community Service component, such as completing a forest inventory for a local forest, assisting with the campus tree map, or help with seed-saving measures at the College Organic Garden. Field trips will be the norm early in the semester. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

SCI

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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BIOL 0211 - Biostatistics      

Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis
Experimental design is one of the most important parts of doing science, but it is difficult to do well. How do you randomize mice? How many replicate petri plates should be inoculated? If I am measuring temperature in a forest, where do I put the thermometer? In this course students will design experiments across the sub-areas of biology. We will run student designed experiments, and then learn ways to analyze the data, and communicate the results. Students planning to do independent research are encouraged to take this course. (This course is not open to students who have taken MATH 0116 or PSYC 0201 or ECON 0210)

DED

Winter 2011, Winter 2012, Winter 2013, Winter 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

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BIOL 0216 - Animal Behavior      

Animal Behavior
The behavior of animals primarily from an ethological perspective, with respect to genetics, physiology, evolution, and other biological factors. The course follows the history and methods of studying individual and social behaviors like feeding, courtship, mating, parental care, defense, predation, and migration. We examine live animals in the field and lab to illustrate such processes as instinct, learning, and communication. Discussion topics include behaviorism, intelligence, and sociobiology, analytical methods from tracking animals in the field to computerized motion analysis in the lab are utilized, and students design their own research projects. Oral, written, and independent projects are required. (BIOL 0140 or BIOL 0145) 2.5 hrs. lect./1 hr. video screen./3 hrs lab

SCI

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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BIOL 0222 - Human Nutrition-Evolution      

Human Nutrition from an Evolutionary Perspective
Michael Pollan’s mantra – “Eat food; not too much; mainly plants!” – sums up this course. The mantra raises more questions than it answers, however. For example, does it apply to all humans? Are some diets effective for some people and not others? Should we eat like our ancestors? What did they eat? What nutritional problems may have accompanied the dietary shift from a hunting/gathering to agricultural and modern sedentary modes of existence. We will discuss possible answers to these and other questions and approach human nutrition from an evolutionary perspective, derived in part from Diamond’s Guns, Germs, and Steel, and the archeological record. We will also examine the diets of “modern primitive societies”, as well as those of our more recent ethnic forbears and of our more distant primate relatives. Using these perspectives and our current understanding of nutrition and human biology, we will critically examine the ways we eat, how we possibly ought to eat. We will also discuss the effect of exercise on gene activity and, possibly, such topics as the role of fats and lipoproteins in heart disease and the genetic variability of various human populations as it relates to nutrition. Emphasis will be placed on a critical approach to both written and virtual forms of scientific and popular resource material, and students will write 7 short papers and a longer term paper and will make oral presentations of nutritional topics. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145; or by approval).

SCI WTR

Winter 2011, Winter 2012

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BIOL 0225 - Human Genetics      

Human Genetics
This course incorporates both classical, molecular, and bioinformatics based approaches to study the structure of the human genome, gene function, the effects of mutation, and analysis of the genetic structure of pedigrees and populations. We will examine a collection of human genetic diseases with a focus on their molecular and biochemical basis and medical implications. Further, emphasis is placed on the study of the origin of Homo sapiens, modern genetic diversity in humans, and the molecular evolutionary changes that define humans relative to other primates and animals. (BIOL 0140 and 0145 or waiver)

DED SCI

Spring 2011, Winter 2013

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BIOL 0230 - Global Change Biology      

Global Change Biology
We will examine the effects of global change (climate and land use change) on ecosystems. Our emphasis will be on exploring what we know about global change biology, and also how we know it: how do biologists study processes on a global scale? How can we accurately predict future changes in ecosystems? We will also investigate biological feedbacks on the earth system: how changes in the composition of ecosystems and the rate of basic ecosystem processes (photosynthesis, respiration) may alter the climate of the earth. (BIOL 0140) 3 hrs lect.

SCI

Spring 2012, Fall 2012

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BIOL 0235 - Sexual Selection      

Sexual Selection
Charles Darwin described sexual selection as the mode of selection that favors traits that enhance an individual’s reproductive success. Sexual selection has shaped behavior, morphology, physiology, and cognitive ability in many species. We will first read portions of Darwin’s The Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex followed by journal articles representative of the major questions in the field. Topics will include: mate choice, intrasexual competition, alternative mating strategies, and the role of sexual selection in the evolution of the brain. Students will lead class discussions and write a final paper on sexual selection. This course can be taken for Neuroscience and Biology major credit. (BIOL 0140 and 0145)

SCI

Winter 2014

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BIOL 0240 - Tropical Ecology      

Tropical Ecology
Tropical regions possess the majority of the planet's biota. In this course we will explore the diversity, natural history, and ecology of organisms in the New World tropics (mostly Costa Rica) and Old World tropics (mostly South Africa). Students will explore the details of the ecology of plants and animals in these areas as well as the many explanations for the high species diversity in these areas. This course will prepare students for a semester of study in Costa Rica or South Africa through the Organization for Tropical Studies, should they decide to attend. (BIOL 0140). 3 hrs lect/disc

SCI

Fall 2011

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BIOL 0270 - Neural Disorders      

Neural Disorders
Neuroscience is one of the most rapidly progressing sciences, and recent scientific and clinical studies alter how we view both the brain and ourselves. In this course we will examine the human nervous system and problems that arise when the nervous system goes awry. Readings and discussions will include popular writings as well as primary literature to focus on disorders such as multiple sclerosis, autism, Alzheimer's disease, depression, and Parkinsonism. Students read for each meeting from the current literature, and prepare in-depth class presentations on topics of their choosing. (BIOL 0145 or PSYC 0105; not open to students who have taken BIOL 0470)

SCI

Spring 2015

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BIOL 0280 - Immunology      

Immunology
In this course we will explore the human immune system and how it works to protect the body from infection. Students will be introduced to the cells and molecules of the immune system and how they work together to protect the host from foreign invaders. We will focus on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of innate immunity before exploring the cellular and genetic principles that underlie the adaptive immune response. Finally, we will investigate how innate and adaptive immunity work together to combat infection and how disease can arise from inadequacies in this coordinated host response. Not open to students who have taken BIOL 0340 (BIOL 0145)

SCI WTR

Winter 2012, Winter 2013

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BIOL 0302 - Vertebrate Natural History      

Vertebrate Natural History
This course deals with the natural history of vertebrates in the context of the forests, fields, wetlands, and rivers of western Vermont. We will explore in depth the taxonomy of the local vertebrate fauna; techniques for capturing and handling live animals, particularly birds, mammals, and fish; and address experimentally specific questions about the distribution and abundance of vertebrates in a range of natural plant communities. Topics considered will include conservation biology, population and community ecology, and behavior. Field work will involve several early morning and weekend trips. (BIOL 0140) 6+ hrs. lab/field.

SCI

Fall 2010, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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BIOL 0304 - Aquatic Ecology      

Aquatic Ecology
This field course will introduce students to the freshwater aquatic ecosystems of the northeastern U.S., including lakes, streams, rivers, and wetlands. We will explore the ecological processes that dominate these systems, the organisms that inhabit them, and the ecological techniques central to their study. Field exercises will include trips to many aquatic ecosystems in the region; experience with sampling techniques for measurement of physical, chemical, and biological features; and experimental design for answering questions about the relationships among species and between species and their environment. (BIOL 0140) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

CW SCI

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2014

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BIOL 0305 - Developmental Biology      

Developmental Biology
Have you ever wondered how an embryo develops from a simple fertilized egg to a complex adult? This course explores this question, examining the preparation and initiation of development (gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavages, and gastrulation), the formation of embryonic structure (morphogenesis), the creation of embryonic pattern (pattern formation), and the control of gene expression during embryogenesis. In lab, students will design and carry out experiments at the cutting edge of developmental biology, incorporating modern cellular, molecular, and genetic techniques with classical embryological approaches. Fundamental mysteries of development will be investigated in model organisms that best illustrate each process. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) 3 hrs. lect./4 hrs. lab

SCI

Fall 2010, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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BIOL 0310 - Microbiology      

Microbiology
The microbiological principles emphasized in this class will provide students with a foundation for advanced study in many areas of contemporary biology. The course will integrate basic and applied aspects of microbiology into a study of the prokaryotic microorganisms. General principles of bacterial cell structure, function, and the role of microorganisms in industry, agriculture, biotechnology, and disease will be discussed. An independent laboratory project will stress basic microbiological techniques as applied to the isolation, characterization, and identification of microorganisms from the natural environment. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145 and CHEM 0103) 3 hrs. lect./4 hrs. lab./1 hr. prelab.

SCI

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013

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BIOL 0314 - Molecular Genetics      

Molecular Genetics
This course will focus on the structure and function of nucleic acids in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Lectures will center on molecular mechanisms of mutation, transposition, and recombination, the regulation of gene expression, and gene control in development, immune diversity and carcinogenesis. Readings from the primary literature will complement the textbook and classroom discussions. The laboratory will provide training in both classic and contemporary molecular-genetic techniques including nucleic acid isolation and purification, cloning, electroporation, nick-translation, Southern/Northern blotting, DNA sequencing, PCR and RT-PCR. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145 or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./4 hrs. lab./1 hr. prelab.

SCI

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014

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BIOL 0323 - Plant Community Ecology      

Plant Community Ecology
This course will explore the structure and dynamics of plant communities, with a particular emphasis on temperate forest communities. We will investigate patterns in community diversity and structure, explore how plant populations and plant communities respond to environmental disturbances, and investigate the effects of anthropogenic influences (climate change, introduced species, habitat conversion) on plant communities. Labs will emphasize fieldwork at local research sites, and will provide exposure to techniques of experimental design in plant ecology and basic approaches to describing plant community structure and dynamics. (BIOL 0140) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

SCI

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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BIOL 0330 - Microbial Pathogenesis      

Mechanisms of Microbial Pathogenesis
Many microorganisms have the potential to cause disease. An understanding of the mechanisms that promote bacterial pathogenesis is therefore essential for the development of effective disease prevention and/or treatment strategies. This course will explore the mechanisms by which microbial pathogens adhere to, invade, and persist in the human host. While an emphasis will be placed on microbial mechanisms of disease, the host response to the infectious process will also be discussed. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) 3 hrs lect/disc.

SCI

Spring 2012

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BIOL 0331 - The Genetics of Cancer      

The Genetics of Cancer
In this course we will examine the molecular and cellular mechanisms that serve to regulate normal cell proliferation, survival, and senescence in order to understand how alterations in these mechanisms can lead to cancer. Students will develop and propose research projects based on their own specific interests. Topics covered may include: classification of cancers, animal models, oncogenes and tumor suppressors, mitogenic signals, genetic and epigenetic alterations, external causes of cancer, and current treatment protocols. We will also examine cancer’s far-reaching influence outside the confines of molecular and cell biology. (BIOL 0140, BIOL 0145, and BIOL 0314) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

DED SCI

Winter 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2015

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BIOL 0350 - Endocrinology      

Endocrinology is a branch of animal physiology devoted to the study of hormones and the endocrine glands that produce them. Hormones are essential for maintaining homeostasis and coordinating biological functions such as growth, reproduction, metabolism, and reaction to stress. This course will cover the diverse mechanisms that hormones use to influence physiology and behavior. We will consider hormone function from comparative, clinical, and environmental perspectives with an emphasis on the behavioral response to hormones. Lectures will describe the cellular and molecular basis of endocrine regulation and consider the function of each of the major hormone groups produced by the body, such as hypothalamic, pituitary, adrenal, and sex steroids. Weekly journal article discussions will focus on current topics in endocrinology. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) 3 hrs. lect.

SCI

Fall 2011, Spring 2013

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BIOL 0369 - Meiosis      

Meiosis
Meiosis is essential to sexual reproduction and has ancient conservation of mechanism across many taxa. It requires accurate genome duplication, proper cell signaling, chromosome synapsis, crossing over, and segregation and extensive epigenetics. Despite being considerably less efficient than asexual reproduction, meiosis has a somewhat improbably strong foothold in the tree of life. Through critical use of scientific literature and laboratory techniques we will consider meiosis from multiple perspectives and interpret its role in current themes including GMOs, plant speciation, human reproduction, and genetic diversity. 3hrs/wk seminar and 4hrs/wk lab. (BIOL 0140 and 0145; and either BIOL 0314 or CHEM 0242, or approval)

SCI

Fall 2011

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BIOL 0370 - Animal Physiology      

Animal Physiology
This course examines the body functions of animals and humans using general physiological principles and a comparative approach. Lectures will cover the function of each of the major physiological systems (nervous, endocrine, muscular, etc.) and will describe how animal physiology has been shaped by evolution to allow animals to survive in a wide range of environmental conditions. Lectures will focus mainly on physiological processes occurring at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels. Occasional journal article discussions will provide case studies of current topics in animal physiology. Laboratory exercises, reports and oral presentations emphasize experimental design, analysis and independent study using various methodological approaches including electrophysiology, neurotransmitter manipulations, nutritional analysis, and exercise physiology. (BIOL 0145 and BIOL 0140 or BIOL 0216). 3 hrs. lect/3 hrs. lab.

SCI

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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BIOL 0390 - Advanced Ecology      

Advanced Ecology
What determines the carrying capacity of a population? When a new species is introduced into a habitat, can we predict its effect? What regulates species in an area: a predator acting in a top down fashion, or plant biomass in a bottom up way? This course builds on the ideas presented in BIOL 0140 and deals in greater depth with population ecology, demography, life history strategies, species interactions, community structure, and dynamics. For each of these topics we will examine the mathematical models that have been developed to describe the systems. BIOL 0140, 3 hrs. lecture/computer lab.

SCI

Spring 2012

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BIOL 0392 - Conservation Biology      

Conservation Biology
This course will focus on advanced topics in applied ecology and population genetics as they relate to the protection and restoration of biological integrity in the natural world. Emphasis will be placed on in-depth exploration of current issues, such as the design of nature reserves, genetic and demographic factors associated with population decline, metapopulation analysis, connectivity, and large-scale ecological processes. This course will involve reading from the primary literature, discussion, computer modeling, and writing assignments, and will build upon the information presented in the prerequisite courses. (BIOL 0140)

SCI

Winter 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Winter 2015

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BIOL 0395 - Advanced Evolution      

Advanced Evolution
This course will examine in depth many special topics in evolutionary biology: genetic variation in natural populations, field and laboratory investigations of natural selection, special problems of small populations, evolution at the molecular level, sexual selection, evolution of senescence, and population genetics. Current theories will be explored through readings of primary literature and the textbook. Each student will conduct an independent research project on a topic of their choosing. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

SCI

Spring 2011

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BIOL 0420 - Neurogenetics      

Neurogenetics
Genetics is the study of how biological information encoded in our genes is transmitted between generations, how the information is preserved, how it mutates, and how it is translated; that is to say heredity. Neurobiology is the study of how neurons work, individually and within a network of other neurons. Advances in genetics have revolutionized our approach to studying biology at all levels of organization, and advances in neurobiology have opened the way to understanding the last frontier of human physiology: the brain. In this course we will examine how a genetics perspective can aid our understanding of complex neural systems. While we will encounter several cell biological approaches to studying neurons, the focus will be on genetic questions and methodologies of how neurons work to produce sensation and behavior. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

SCI

Fall 2013

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BIOL 0430 - Invasive Species      

Invasive Species
Increasingly, species are being found in new locations. In some cases the new species have no demonstrable effect on the habitat. However, there are many cases where invasive species have changed entire ecosystems, such as the defoliation of an entire forest by gypsy moths. We will address the causes and consequences of species invasions by exploring the primary literature. Questions will include: Why are some introduced species invasive whereas others are not? What are the consequences for native species, and how may invasive species be controlled? (BIOL 0140; and one other 0200- or 0300- level biology course) 3 hrs sem.

SCI

Spring 2012

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BIOL 0450 - Topics Reproductive Medicine      

Topics in Reproductive Medicine
In this course we will examine the fundamentals of human reproduction and modern reproductive intervention strategies. Rapid discoveries in medical technologies have allowed us to push the limits of the human body, and we will explore the scientific and medical challenges that surround the control of fertility and infertility, fetal life, birth, and the neonatal period. Through critical review of the primary literature, writing, and informed dialogues, students will gain an understanding of key topics in reproductive medicine. (BIOL 0140, BIOL 0145, and one other 0200 or 0300-level biology course, or by waiver) 3 hrs. sem.

SCI

Fall 2010, Winter 2013, Spring 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

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BIOL 0460 - Plant-Animal Interactions      

Plant-Animal Interactions
The mutualisms and antagonisms between plants and animals will form the focus of this seminar. We will discuss pollination, seed dispersal, insect defense of plants, and herbivory from both perspectives (the plant's and the animal's) and the evolutionary responses of these intense co-evolving entities. The format for the course will be both classroom and field based. Students will lead discussions of papers from the primary literature, perform individual or group research projects, and present results in both oral and written form. (BIOL 0140 and one other 0200- or 0300-level biology course). 3 hrs seminar/lab

SCI

Fall 2010, Fall 2012, Fall 2014

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BIOL 0470 - Neural Disorders      

Neural Disorders
Neuroscience is one of the most rapidly progressing sciences, and recent scientific and clinical studies alter how we view both the brain and ourselves. In this lecture/seminar course we will examine the human nervous system and problems that arise when the nervous system goes awry. Readings and discussions will include popular writings as well as primary literature to focus on disorders such as multiple sclerosis, autism, Alzheimer's disease, depression, and Parkinsonism. Students read for each meeting from the current literature, and prepare in-depth class presentations on topics of their choosing. (BIOL 0370 or PYSC 0301) 3 hrs. sem.

SCI

Winter 2011, Fall 2012

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BIOL 0475 - Neuroplasticity      

Neuroplasticity
In order for the brain to encode, process, and retain new information, it must constantly change. Neuroplasticity refers to this capacity of the central nervous system to modify its organization in response to endogenous or environmental stimuli. In this course we will discuss the molecular and cellular basis of multiple forms of neuroplasticity within the adult brain (e.g., LTP, synaptogenesis, and neurogenesis) and examine how neuroplasticity contributes to learning and memory, neural regeneration following injury, and various neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and depression). (BIOL 0216 or BIOL 0370 or PSYC 301) 3hrs sem.

SCI

Spring 2012, Spring 2014

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BIOL 0480 - Neurobiology      

Neurobiology
Only recently has it become possible to study brain function and behavior at the level of cells and neural circuits. We study neurophysiology by examining how neurons, their connections, circuits, brain pathways and regulatory centers help form behaviors. By focusing primarily upon recent research on simple animals or simpler human brain circuits, we learn about neural controls and extrapolate to human behavior. Topics include genetic, developmental and molecular neurobiology, sensation, learning and the control of motion, feeding, and escape. Students present topics on current neurobiological literature and learn techniques from the literature. (BIOL 0145 and BIOL 0216 or PSYC 0301) 3 hrs.sem/ 3 hrs lab.

SCI

Fall 2010, Fall 2011

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BIOL 0490 - Seminar in Plant Ecology      

Seminar in Plant Ecology
Global climate change has led to a huge effort to collect data on the state of the planet, including measurements of temperature, atmospheric and oceanographic conditions, and species distributions and phenologies. Ecologists have never had access to such quantities of data, and thus need new methods for their description and analysis. In this course we will explore how to use statistical models to make sense of these data: how to develop, choose, and fit the best model for a particular data set. The course will be project-based, culminate in an independent project, and use the statistical software, R. (BIOL 0140 and one statistics course required, no R experience required.) 3 hr. sem./3 hr. lab

DED SCI

Spring 2011, Spring 2013, Spring 2014

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BIOL 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
In this course students complete individual projects involving laboratory and/or field research or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and a faculty advisor. Prior to registering for BIOL 0500, a student must have discussed and agreed upon a project topic with a member of the Biology Department faculty. Additional requirements include participation in weekly meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and attending all Biology Department seminars. This course is not open to seniors; seniors should enroll in BIOL 0700, Senior Independent Study. (Approval required) 3 hrs. disc.

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

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BIOL 0700 - Senior Independent Study      

Senior Independent Study
In this course students complete individual projects involving laboratory and/or field research or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and a faculty advisor. Prior to registering for BIOL 0700, a student must have discussed and agreed upon a project topic with a member of the Biology Department faculty. Additional requirements include participation in weekly meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and attending all Biology Department seminars. (Approval required; open only to seniors) 3 hrs. disc.

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

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BIOL 0701 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis
Seniors majoring in Biology who have completed one or more semesters of BIOL 0500 or BIOL 0700 and who plan to complete a thesis should register for BIOL 0701. In this course students will produce a written thesis, deliver a public presentation of the research on which it is based, and present an oral defense of the thesis before a committee of at least three faculty members. Additional requirements include participation in weekly meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and attending all Biology Department seminars. Open to Biology and joint Biology/Environmental Studies majors. (BIOL 0500 or BIOL 0700 or waiver; instructor approval required for all students) 3 hrs. disc

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

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BIOL 1004 - Predators & Biodiversity      

Large Carnivores and the Conservation of Biodiversity
What is the relationship between top predators and biological diversity? Examples abound of the apparently positive effect that predators can have on ecosystems but scientific opinion about the role of predators remains divided. In this course we will examine the ecological theory that has shaped our understanding of predator-prey relationships and will discuss and critique real-world studies of predation. Along the way, we will consider the practical implications that this research has had for the management of fish, wildlife, and plant populations. Readings will include scientific publications, government reports, and popular accounts, including writings by Aldo Leopold and Cristina Eisenberg’s The Wolf's Tooth: Keystone Predators, Trophic Cascades, and Biodiversity. (This course counts as an elective towards the major in Biology) (BIOL 0140)

SCI WTR

Winter 2013

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BIOL 1005 - Cancer in American Society      

Cancer in America: History, Biology and Social Impact
There were over 1.5 million new diagnoses of invasive cancer in the United States in 2010. While our overall approach to treating this ancient disease is still somewhat rudimentary, current treatment regimens have resulted in nearly two of three patients being cured. Despite this, a diagnosis of cancer remains a life altering event that can forever alter self-image and family dynamics. In this course students will be introduced to the history, basic biology, screening, and public policy of cancer. We will also explore the place that cancer holds in American society and how we, as individuals and society, approach this disease.

SCI SOC WTR

Winter 2014

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