COVID-19: Essential Information

Jeremy Ward

Albert D. Mead Professor of Biology

Interests: Cell Biology and Genetics, STEM Education, Biotechnology and Society

 
 work(802) 443-3499
 Office hours Fall 2021, MBH 309b, Wed. 9-11am and Thur. 11am-1pm or by appointment
 McCardell Bicen Hall 309B

 

Biography and Research/Teaching Interests

I attended Cornell University, majoring in cell biology and genetics and earned my Ph.D. at Weill Cornell Graduate School in Medical Sciences in cancer biology.  I conducted my research at Memorial Sloan Kettering Institute studying the molecular cause of acute promyelocytic leukemia.  My post-doctoral work at The Jackson Laboratory focused on the genetic basis for accurate production of gametes during mammalian meiosis and reproduction. 

My current research interests include reproductive genetics in mammals and genetics in general in diverse systems, inclusive STEM education strategies, and the intersection of biotechnology and society.  In the area of reproductive genetics, we have shown that the gene Hei10 is essential for reproduction and plays a key role in determining the frequency of the meiotic DNA exchange known as crossing-over.  Similarly, we have also shown that the gene Akap9 is necessary for male meiosis and most likely functions during meiosis and sperm maturation in the testes. In collaboration with colleagues in Psychology and Neuroscience, we have also identified regions of the mouse genome responsible for testicular size variation.  Our laboratory is also involved in research identifying the prevalence of the Lyme disease causative agent, Borrelia burgdorferi, in ticks in Vermont, developing biosensors for B. burgdorferi, and studying the role of altitude in B. burgdorferi  infection rates.

 

Courses

Course List: 

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

BIOL 0145 - Cell Biology and Genetics      

Cell Biology and Genetics
In this introduction to modern cellular, genetic, and molecular biology we will explore life science concepts with an emphasis on their integral nature and evolutionary relationships. Topics covered will include cell membrane structure and function, metabolism, cell motility and division, genome structure and replication, the regulation of gene expression and protein production, genotype to phenotype relationship, and basic principles of inheritance. Major concepts will be illustrated using a broad range of examples from plants, animals, and microorganisms. Current topics in biology will be integrated into the course as they arise. (For students matriculating in Fall 2019 or later: CHEM 0103 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab DED SCI

Fall 2017, Fall 2019, Spring 2022

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BIOL 0314 - Molecular Genetics      

Molecular Genetics
This course will focus on the structure and function of nucleic acids in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Lectures will center on molecular mechanisms of mutation, transposition, and recombination, the regulation of gene expression, and gene control in development, immune diversity and carcinogenesis. Readings from the primary literature will complement the textbook and classroom discussions. The laboratory will provide training in both classic and contemporary molecular-genetic techniques including nucleic acid isolation and purification, cloning, electroporation, nick-translation, Southern/Northern blotting, DNA sequencing, PCR and RT-PCR. (BIOL or MBBC majors, or by waiver. BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145 or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./4 hrs. lab./1 hr. prelab. SCI

Fall 2018, Spring 2022

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BIOL 0324 / MBBC 0324 - Genomics      

Genomics
Genomics is a quickly evolving field that analyzes and contextualizes genome sequencing data and high-throughput techniques. Genomics is the study of the nucleic acid content of organisms. In this course students will use national repositories of genomic information, databases, and open-source bioinformatics tools to visualize and manipulate genomic data. We will also explore genomics’ larger social context, particularly as it relates to the environment and medical informatics. In the laboratory we will explore and use the methodology used in genomics to develop and interpret large datasets (CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107,and BIOL 0145 and BIOL0140, or by waiver) (not open to students who have taken BIOL 0334) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab DED SCI

Spring 2018, Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2021

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BIOL 0371 - Advanced Field Biology      

Advanced Field Biology: Place-based Global Biology Education
In this upper level biology course, we will conduct field-based scientific observation, sample and data collection, and interpretation of biological phenomena. Students will be deeply engaged in off-campus, place-based learning far outside Vermont practicing molecular and population genetics, ecology, biogeochemistry, and site mapping. The course is two weeks off-campus and two weeks on-campus conducting group research projects integrating field observations with laboratory analysis. Students will collaborate and partner with local community members on intercultural projects with ethical local impact and relevance. Open to Biology majors or by waiver. (BIOL 0145 and BIOL 0140 and a 300 level BIOL class with laboratory or by waiver)

Winter 2019, Winter 2020, Winter 2022

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BIOL 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
In this course students complete individual projects involving laboratory and/or field research or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and a faculty advisor. Prior to registering for BIOL 0500, a student must have discussed and agreed upon a project topic with a member of the Biology Department faculty. Additional requirements include attendance at all Biology Department seminars and participation in any scheduled meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and lab groups. This course is not open to seniors; seniors should enroll in BIOL 0700, Senior Independent Study. (BIOL 0211. Approval required) 3 hrs. disc.

Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022

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BIOL 0700 - Senior Independent Study      

Senior Independent Study
In this course students complete individual projects involving laboratory and/or field research or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and a faculty advisor. Prior to registering for BIOL 0700, a student must have discussed and agreed upon a project topic with a member of the Biology Department faculty. Additional requirements include attendance at all Biology Department seminars and participation in any scheduled meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and lab groups. (BIOL 0211. Approval required; open only to seniors) 3 hrs. disc.

Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022

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BIOL 0701 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis
Seniors majoring in Biology who have completed one or more semesters of BIOL 0500 or BIOL 0700 and who plan to complete a thesis should register for BIOL 0701. In this course students will produce a written thesis, deliver a public presentation of the research on which it is based, and present an oral defense of the thesis before a committee of at least three faculty members. Additional requirements include attendance at all Biology Department seminars and participation in any scheduled meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and lab groups. Open to Biology and joint Biology/Environmental Studies majors. (BIOL 0211 and BIOL 0500 or BIOL 0700 or waiver; instructor approval required for all students) 3 hrs. disc

Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022

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FYSE 1236 - The Malleable Human      

The Malleable Human
The human body is a remarkable product of evolution, but too often it fails to function as we might like. The genome is essential in determining the body’s characteristics, known as its phenotype, but its influence is not unalterable. In this course we will examine physical, chemical, and genetic modifications to the human body and genome and how they might influence our current perceptions of concepts such as therapy, enhancement, and even humanness itself. We will use non-fiction books, film, scientific literature, and essays to explore how the human genome intersects with external modification. 3 hrs. sem. CW

Fall 2017, Fall 2021

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INDE 0800 - Ind Schol Sr Work/Proj/Thesis      

Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Spring 2019, Spring 2020

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INTD 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
Approval Required

Winter 2018, Winter 2019, Winter 2020, Winter 2021, Winter 2022

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MBBC 0700 - Senior Research      

Senior Thesis
Seniors conducting independent study in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry should register for MBBC 0700 unless they are completing a thesis project in which case they should register for MBBC 0701. (Approval required).

Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022

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MBBC 0701 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis
Students conducting independent thesis research in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry must register for MBBC 0701 while completing research projects initiated in BIOL 0500, MBBC 0700, or CHEM 0400. Students will organize and lead regular discussions of their research and research methods, and attend weekly meetings with their designated laboratory group to foster understanding of their special area, and practice the stylistic and technical aspects of scientific writing needed to write their thesis. (CHEM 0400 or BIOL 0500 or MBBC 0700) (Approval required).

Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022

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Publications (bold type indicates Middlebury undergraduate co-authors)

2020

Katherine E. Parker, Jeremy O. Ward, Erin M. Eggleston, Evan Fedorov, John Everett Parkinson, Craig P. Dahlgren & Ross Cunning. Characterization of a thermally tolerant Orbicella faveolata reef in Abaco, The Bahamas.  Coral Reefs v. 39, pages 675-685 (2020).

C. Merenstein, J. Ward, and D. Allen. Diplorickettsia in the microbiome of an Ixodes scapularis tick in western Vermont. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2020.

2019

Allen D, Borgmann-Winter B, Bashor L, Ward J. The Density of the Lyme Disease Vector, Ixodes scapularis (Blacklegged Tick), Differs Between the Champlain Valley and Green Mountains, Vermont. Northeast Nat (Steuben). 2019 Jul;26(3):545-560.

2018

Joshua T. Yuan, Daniel M. Gatti, Vivek M. Philip, Steven Kasparek, Andrew M. Kreuzman, Benjamin Mansky, Kayvon Sharif, Dominik Taterra, Walter M. Taylor, Mary Thomas, Jeremy O. Ward, Andrew Holmes, Elissa J. Chesler, and Clarissa C. Parker. Genome-wide association for testis weight in the diversity outbred mouse population. Mamm Genome (2018) 29: 310. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00335-018-9745-8

2014

Qiao, H., Prasada Rao, H. B. D., Yang, Y., Fong, J. H., Cloutier, J. M., Deacon, D. C., Nagel, K. E., Swartz R.K., Strong, E., Holloway, J.K., Cohen, P.E., Schimenti, J., Ward, J., and Hunter, N.(2014). Antagonistic roles of ubiquitin ligase HEI10 and SUMO ligase RNF212 regulate meiotic recombination. Nat Genet, 2014 Jan 5. doi:10.1038/ng.2858

2013

Schimenti, K. J., Feuer, S. K., Griffin, L. B., Graham, N. R., Bovet, C. A., Hartford, S., Pendola, J., et al. (2013). AKAP9 is essential for spermatogenesis and sertoli cell maturation in mice. Genetics,194(2), 447-57. 2013 Jun. doi:10.1534/genetics.113.150789

2007

Ward, J. O., Reinholdt, L. G., Motley, W. W., Niswander, L. M., Deacon, D. C., Griffin, L. B., Langlais, K. K., et al. (2007). Mutation in mouse hei10, an e3 ubiquitin ligase, disrupts meiotic crossing over. PLoS Genet, 3(8), e139. 2007 Aug. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.0030139

Kim, S., Namekawa, S. H., Niswander, L. M., Ward, J. O., Lee, J. T., Bardwell, V. J., & Zarkower, D. (2007). A mammal-specific Doublesex homolog associates with male sex chromatin and is required for male meiosis. PLoS Genet, 3(4), e62. 2007 Apr 20. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.0030062

2003

Ward, J. O., Reinholdt, L. G., Hartford, S. A., Wilson, L. A., Munroe, R. J., Schimenti, K. J., Libby, B. J., et al. (2003). Toward the genetics of mammalian reproduction: induction and mapping of gametogenesis mutants in mice. Biol Reprod, 69(5), 1615-25. 2003 Nov. doi:10.1095/biolreprod.103.019877

Department of Biology

McCardell Bicentennial Hall
276 Bicentennial Way
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753