Middlebury

 

Jeremy Ward

Albert D. Mead Professor of Biology
Interests: Cancer biology, Neurobiology, Reproduction, STEM education

Email: 
Phone: work802.443.3499
Office Hours: Fall 2014: M 2-3:30 PM, F 10:30-Noon
Download Contact Information

 

Biography and Research/Teaching Interests

As an undergraduate, I attended Cornell University and majored in cell biology and genetics.  Following that, I attended the Weill Cornell Graduate School in Medical Sciences and received my Ph.D. in cancer biology from Memorial Sloan Kettering Institute where I studied the molecular cause of acute promyelocytic leukemia.  I did my post-doctoral work at The Jackson Laboratory studying the genetic basis for accurate production of gametes during mammalian meiosis.

I am a broadly trained molecular geneticist and my laboratory group currently has four main research areas:

   (1) The neurobiology of signal transduction in the brain

   (2) Fundamental aspects of DNA recombination and genome integrity during
        mitosis and meiosis

   (3) The molecular genetics of fertility in mammals

   (4) Science pedagogy

Our group's work has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and Middlebury College.  We also have a an extensive network of lab alumni and collaborators and if you are interested in our work please don't hesitate to contact me.

 

Courses


indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

BIOL 0145 - Cell Biology and Genetics      

Cell Biology and Genetics
In this introduction to modern cellular, genetic, and molecular biology we will explore life science concepts with an emphasis on their integral nature and evolutionary relationships. Topics covered will include cell membrane structure and function, metabolism, cell motility and division, genome structure and replication, the regulation of gene expression and protein production, genotype to phenotype relationship, and basic principles of inheritance. Major concepts will be illustrated using a broad range of examples from plants, animals, and microorganisms. Current topics in biology will be integrated into the course as they arise. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

DED SCI

Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2014

More Information »

BIOL 0225 - Human Genetics      

Human Genetics
This course incorporates both classical, molecular, and bioinformatics based approaches to study the structure of the human genome, gene function, the effects of mutation, and analysis of the genetic structure of pedigrees and populations. We will examine a collection of human genetic diseases with a focus on their molecular and biochemical basis and medical implications. Further, emphasis is placed on the study of the origin of Homo sapiens, modern genetic diversity in humans, and the molecular evolutionary changes that define humans relative to other primates and animals. (BIOL 0140 and 0145 or waiver)

DED SCI

Spring 2011, Winter 2013

More Information »

BIOL 0331 - The Genetics of Cancer      

The Genetics of Cancer
In this course we will examine the molecular and cellular mechanisms that serve to regulate normal cell proliferation, survival, and senescence in order to understand how alterations in these mechanisms can lead to cancer. Students will develop and propose research projects based on their own specific interests. Topics covered may include: classification of cancers, animal models, oncogenes and tumor suppressors, mitogenic signals, genetic and epigenetic alterations, external causes of cancer, and current treatment protocols. We will also examine cancer’s far-reaching influence outside the confines of molecular and cell biology. (BIOL 0140, BIOL 0145, and BIOL 0314) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

DED SCI

Winter 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2015

More Information »

BIOL 0369 - Meiosis      

Meiosis
Meiosis is essential to sexual reproduction and has ancient conservation of mechanism across many taxa. It requires accurate genome duplication, proper cell signaling, chromosome synapsis, crossing over, and segregation and extensive epigenetics. Despite being considerably less efficient than asexual reproduction, meiosis has a somewhat improbably strong foothold in the tree of life. Through critical use of scientific literature and laboratory techniques we will consider meiosis from multiple perspectives and interpret its role in current themes including GMOs, plant speciation, human reproduction, and genetic diversity. 3hrs/wk seminar and 4hrs/wk lab. (BIOL 0140 and 0145; and either BIOL 0314 or CHEM 0242, or approval)

SCI

Fall 2011

More Information »

BIOL 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
In this course students complete individual projects involving laboratory and/or field research or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and a faculty advisor. Prior to registering for BIOL 0500, a student must have discussed and agreed upon a project topic with a member of the Biology Department faculty. Additional requirements include participation in weekly meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and attending all Biology Department seminars. This course is not open to seniors; seniors should enroll in BIOL 0700, Senior Independent Study. (Approval required) 3 hrs. disc.

Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

More Information »

BIOL 0700 - Senior Independent Study      

Senior Independent Study
In this course students complete individual projects involving laboratory and/or field research or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and a faculty advisor. Prior to registering for BIOL 0700, a student must have discussed and agreed upon a project topic with a member of the Biology Department faculty. Additional requirements include participation in weekly meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and attending all Biology Department seminars. (Approval required; open only to seniors) 3 hrs. disc.

Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

More Information »

BIOL 0701 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis
Seniors majoring in Biology who have completed one or more semesters of BIOL 0500 or BIOL 0700 and who plan to complete a thesis should register for BIOL 0701. In this course students will produce a written thesis, deliver a public presentation of the research on which it is based, and present an oral defense of the thesis before a committee of at least three faculty members. Additional requirements include participation in weekly meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and attending all Biology Department seminars. Open to Biology and joint Biology/Environmental Studies majors. (BIOL 0500 or BIOL 0700 or waiver; instructor approval required for all students) 3 hrs. disc

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

More Information »

INTD 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
Approval Required

Winter 2013, Winter 2014, Winter 2015

More Information »

MBBC 0324 - Bioinformatics and Genomics      

Bioinformatics and Genomics
Bioinformatics and genomics are quickly evolving fields that analyze and contextualize genome sequencing data. Genomics is the study, with an emphasis on high-throughput techniques, of the nucleic acid content of organisms. Bioinformatics is the interdisciplinary field that uses the techniques of statistics, computer science, and system organization to interpret this genomic data. In this course students will use national repositories of genomic information, databases, and open-source bioinformatics tools to visualize and manipulate genomic data. We will also explore genomics’ larger social context, particularly as it relates to medical informatics. (CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107 and BIOL 0145 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect.

DED SCI

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2015

More Information »

MBBC 0700 - Senior Research      

Senior Thesis
Seniors conducting independent study in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry should register for MBBC 0700 unless they are completing a thesis project in which case they should register for MBBC 0701. (Approval required).

Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

More Information »

MBBC 0701 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis
Students conducting independent thesis research in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry must register for MBBC 0701 while completing research projects initiated in BIOL 0500, MBBC 0700, or CHEM 0400. Students will organize and lead regular discussions of their research and research methods, and attend weekly meetings with their designated laboratory group to foster understanding of their special area, and practice the stylistic and technical aspects of scientific writing needed to write their thesis. (CHEM 0400 or BIOL 0500 or MBBC 0700) (Approval required).

Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

More Information »

PHIL 0213 - Theories of Scientific Method      

Theories of Scientific Method
The scientific method is one of humankind's best attempts at rationally uncovering the objective structure of the world. But what exactly is this method and in what sense is it rational? Studying both contemporary science and prominent episodes from the history of science, we will explore questions about (a) the defining characteristics of the scientific method; (b) the soundness of various forms of scientific reasoning (Mill's Methods, Bayesianism, hypothetico-deductive reasoning, and inference to the best explanation); and (c) the objectivity of science. We will also formulate, test, and revise hypotheses in light of the methods that we study. (Students who took PHIL 0212 may not take this course.) 4 hrs. lect.

DED PHL

Spring 2013

More Information »


Publications (bold type indicates Middlebury undergraduate co-authors)

2014

Qiao, H., Prasada Rao, H. B. D., Yang, Y., Fong, J. H., Cloutier, J. M., Deacon, D. C., Nagel, K. E., Swartz R.K., Strong, E., Holloway, J.K., Cohen, P.E., Schimenti, J., Ward, J., and Hunter, N.(2014). Antagonistic roles of ubiquitin ligase HEI10 and SUMO ligase RNF212 regulate meiotic recombination. Nat Genet, 2014 Jan 5. doi:10.1038/ng.2858

2013

Schimenti, K. J., Feuer, S. K., Griffin, L. B., Graham, N. R., Bovet, C. A., Hartford, S., Pendola, J., et al. (2013). AKAP9 is essential for spermatogenesis and sertoli cell maturation in mice. Genetics,194(2), 447-57. 2013 Jun. doi:10.1534/genetics.113.150789

2007

Ward, J. O., Reinholdt, L. G., Motley, W. W., Niswander, L. M., Deacon, D. C., Griffin, L. B., Langlais, K. K., et al. (2007). Mutation in mouse hei10, an e3 ubiquitin ligase, disrupts meiotic crossing over. PLoS Genet, 3(8), e139. 2007 Aug. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.0030139

Kim, S., Namekawa, S. H., Niswander, L. M., Ward, J. O., Lee, J. T., Bardwell, V. J., & Zarkower, D. (2007). A mammal-specific Doublesex homolog associates with male sex chromatin and is required for male meiosis. PLoS Genet, 3(4), e62. 2007 Apr 20. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.0030062

2003

Ward, J. O., Reinholdt, L. G., Hartford, S. A., Wilson, L. A., Munroe, R. J., Schimenti, K. J., Libby, B. J., et al. (2003). Toward the genetics of mammalian reproduction: induction and mapping of gametogenesis mutants in mice. Biol Reprod, 69(5), 1615-25. 2003 Nov. doi:10.1095/biolreprod.103.019877