Middlebury

 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

CHNS 0101 - Beginning Chinese      

Beginning Chinese
This course is an introduction to Mandarin (guoyu or putonghua). The course begins with simple words and phrases, the pronunciation and cadences of Mandarin, romanization, Chinese characters, and simple vocabulary items, all taught in the context of practical communication. Sentence patterns and other fundamentals of speaking, reading, and writing will be taught, including both traditional characters (used everywhere before the 1950s and still used in Taiwan and Hong Kong) and simplified characters (used in China). Students should have achieved active command of more than 600 Chinese characters and more than 800 compounds by the end of the sequence CHNS 0101, CHNS 0102, CHNS 0103. 5 hrs. lect., 2 hrs. drill

LNG

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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CHNS 0102 - Continued Beginning Chinese      

Beginning Chinese
An intensive continuation of CHNS 0101, this course is required of those wishing to take CHNS 0103 in the spring. Students may anticipate learning a significant amount of new vocabulary, sentence patterns and idiomatic expressions. Skits, oral presentations, writing assignments, and cultural activities are also part of this course. (CHNS 0101)

LNG WTR

Winter 2011, Winter 2012, Winter 2013, Winter 2014

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CHNS 0103 - Beginning Chinese      

Beginning Chinese
This course is a continuation of the fall and winter terms with accelerated introduction of vocabulary, grammar, and sentence patterns designed to facilitate speaking and reading. Toward the end of this semester students will read Huarshang de meiren (Lady in the Painting), a short book written entirely in Chinese. (CHNS 0102 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect., 2 hrs. drill

LNG

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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CHNS 0201 - Intermed Chinese      

Intermediate Chinese
This course is designed to enable the student to converse in everyday Chinese and to read simple texts in Chinese (both traditional and simplified characters). Discussion of assigned readings will be conducted primarily in Chinese. Familiarity with the vocabulary and grammar introduced in CHNS 0101, CHNS 0102, and CHNS 0103 is assumed. Grammatical explanations, written exercises, dictation quizzes, sentence patterns, oral drill, and CD's will accompany assignments. By the completion of CHNS 0202, which follows CHNS 0201 directly, students should be able to read and write approximately 1,200 characters. (CHNS 0103 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect., 1 hr. drill

LNG

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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CHNS 0202 - Intermediate Chinese II      

Intermediate Chinese
This course is a continuation of the first term's work, with the class conducted primarily in Chinese. (CHNS 0201) 5 hrs. lect., 1 hr. drill

LNG

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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CHNS 0218 - Writing Lives in China      

Writing Lives in China
How are human lives conveyed in words? Whose lives are deemed worthy of being recorded, for whom, and to what ends? Do life narratives focus on outstanding individuals and heroic feats, or on people with ordinary cares? How do the conventions of autobiography both resemble and differ from those of biography? Approaching these questions in the Chinese literary tradition, we will explore themes of friendship, love, education, death, mourning, and commemoration in prose genres ranging from official biographies to personal letters and diaries. We will read texts by Sima Qian, Li Qingzhao, Liu Zongyuan, Shen Fu, Yang Jiang, and others. This course will be taught in English.

AAL LIT

Spring 2011

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CHNS 0219 - Chinese Literary Tradition      

The Chinese Literary Tradition (in translation)
This course, an introduction to the works of literature that formed the basis of traditional Chinese culture, is a discussion-based seminar. It focuses first on texts written in classical Chinese from the earliest times up through the Song dynasty, including selections from early poetry and history, Daoist classics, stories of the strange, and Tang Dynasty poetry by Wang Wei, Li Bai and Du Fu. These texts shaped the traditional Chinese understanding of the world, and provided models of what was perceived to be powerful, beautiful language. In the second part of the course we will explore narratives written in the vernacular language, focusing on the literary significance and aesthetic value of drama, stories and novels long treasured by the Chinese. Students will gain a better understanding of traditional Chinese literary values, as well as Chinese society and worldviews. This class is not intended for native Chinese students who have studied Chinese literature in high school classes in China. (No background in Chinese culture or language needed.) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL LIT

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2014

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CHNS 0220 - Modern Chinese Literature      

Modern China through Literature (in translation)
This course, taught in English, is a discussion-based seminar on some of the most significant works of short fiction, novellas, and novels that tell the story of China and the Chinese from the end of the Qing dynasty to the present. Students will gain a better understanding of the history of modern China by studying the works of literature that inspired readers and provoked debate during one hundred years of social reform, revolution, war, civil war, reconstruction, cultural revolution, cultural revival, and economic growth. Our reading will include work by authors such as Lu Xun (Diary of a Madman, 1918), Zhang Ailing (Love in a Fallen City, 1944), Ah Cheng (The Chess King, 1984), Yu Hua (To Live, 1993), and, from Taiwan, Zhu Tianwen (Notes of a Desolate Man, 1999). We will consider the mainstream (socially engaged realism), the avant-garde (varieties of modernism), and popular genres (romance and martial arts), and we will look for answers to the following questions: what has been the place of fiction in China in the modern era and what vision of modern China do we find in its fiction? (No prerequisites) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL LIT

Fall 2010, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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CHNS 0250 - Chinese Cinema      

Chinese Cinema
This course, taught in English, surveys the history of movies in China since the 1930s and also offers an in-depth look at the work of: China's fifth-generation directors of the 1980s and their successors up to the present; Taiwan's new wave; and Hong Kong popular cinema, including martial arts film. Our focus is the screening and discussion of films such as The Goddess (a 1934 silent classic), Stage Sisters (1965; directed by the influential Xie Jin), the controversial Yellow Earth (1984), In the Heat of the Sun (a 1994 break with the conventional representation of the Cultural Revolution), Yang Dechang's masterpiece A One and a Two (2000), and Still Life (Jia Zhangke's 2006 meditation on displacement near the Three Gorges Dam). The course is designed to help students understand the place of cinema in Chinese culture and develop the analytical tools necessary for the informed viewing and study of Chinese film. We will look at everything from art film, to underground film, to recent box office hits. (No prerequisites) One evening film screening per week. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL ART

Fall 2013, Spring 2015

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CHNS 0270 - Chinese Sociolinguistics      

Chinese Sociolinguistics (taught in English)
Sociolinguistics is mainly concerned with the interaction of language and society. The language situation in China is unique both in the modern world and in human history. We will gain a good understanding of sociolinguistics as a scientific field of inquiry through exploring the Chinese situation in this course. Some of the questions we will ask are: What is Mandarin (Modern Standard) Chinese? Who are "native speakers" of Mandarin? Are most Chinese people monolingual (speaking only one language) or bilingual (speaking two languages) or even multilingual? How many "dialects" are there in China? What is the difference between a "language" and a "dialect"? Are Chinese characters "ideographs", i.e., "pictures" that directly represent meaning and have nothing to do with sound? Why has the pinyin romanization system officially adopted in the 1950s never supplanted the Chinese characters? Why are there traditional and simplified characters? We will also explore topics such as power, register, verbal courtesy, gender and language use. Students are encouraged to compare the Chinese situation with societies that they are familiar with. (One semester of Chinese language study or by waiver)

AAL SOC

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014

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CHNS 0301 - Advanced Chinese I      

Advanced Chinese (Modern Chinese)
This course aims at further development of overall language proficiency through extensive reading of selected texts representing a wide variety of subjects and styles. Classes will be conducted entirely in Chinese except for occasional recourse to English by the instructor to provide a quick solution to problems of definition. The main text will be All Things Considered with supplementary readings selected to help students both continue to work toward competence in conversational Chinese and also begin to master a more sophisticated register of language. (CHNS 0202 or equivalent) 4 hrs. lect.

LNG

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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CHNS 0302 - Advanced Chinese      

Advanced Chinese (Modern Chinese)
This course is a continuation of CHNS 0301 with continued practice in conversational Chinese and a greater emphasis on reading works of a literary nature. (CHNS 0301 or equivalent) 4 hrs. lect.

LNG

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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CHNS 0325 - Traditional Chinese Poetry      

Traditional Chinese Poetry (in translation)
Introducing the basics of Chinese poetics, this junior/sophomore discussion-based seminar explores inter-connections across a wide spectrum of Chinese poetry belonging to a vibrant tradition spanning more than two thousand years--folk songs; court rhapsodies; courtesan love poems; extended allegorical fantasies; ballads and lyric verse of love, war, friendship, loss, and separation. Landscape, travel, romantic and metaphysical poems by masters such as Qu Yuan, Tao Yuanming, Wang Wei, Li Bai, Du Fu, Su Dongpo and Li Qingzhao will be studied. We will analyze poetic expression ranging from poetic genres following strict formal conventions to relatively free-form verse. Traditional Chinese literary theories regarding poetry and its appreciation will be considered, yet students will also be encouraged to apply other critical approaches. (Either CHNS 0219 or CHNS 0220, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect.

AAL LIT

Spring 2012, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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CHNS 0326 - Tang and Song Poetry      

Reading and Translating Tang and Song Poetry
In this seminar we will study shi poetry of the Tang dynasty and ci lyrics of the Song dynasty. Students will learn to analyze these two important poetic genres in the Chinese literary tradition and will become familiar with major reference works for conducting annotated translation of classical Chinese poetry. Class activities and assignments will include close reading of poetry in Chinese, comparison and analysis of existing translations of Chinese poems in English, background readings and discussion in English, and students' own annotated translation of selected poems.

AAL LIT

Spring 2011

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CHNS 0330 - Love & Sex in Trad Chinese Lit      

Clouds and Rain: Love and Sexuality in Traditional Chinese Literature (in translation)
This seminar explores the spectrum of traditional attitudes toward romantic love and sexuality in pre-modern China as seen through the prism of classical Chinese literature. Fiction and drama will be the focus of this course with some attention given to lyric poetry and autobiographical writing. Literary texts to be analyzed include the early ninth-century story, The Story of Yingying, the late sixteenth-century drama, The Peony Pavilion, the late seventeenth-century erotic novella, The Carnal Prayer Mat, along with selected chapters from the late sixteenth-century erotic novel, Jin Ping Mei, and the eighteenth-century masterwork, The Story of the Stone (also known as Dream of the Red Chamber), etc. Normally offered in alternate years. (Either CHNS 0219, CHNS 0220, or CHNS/FMMC 0250, or by waiver. CHNS 0219 strongly recommended) 3 hrs. lect.

AAL LIT

Fall 2014

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CHNS 0340 - Contemp Chns Lit/Cult      

Literature and Culture in the People's Republic of China (in translation)
The final focus of this course is what is happening in Chinese culture right now, but to understand now we must understand then, and so we will begin in the 1950s. In China from 1949 through the 1980s cultural activity was regarded as exerting, in Mao's words, an "enormous influence" on politics and was therefore placed under prescriptive guidelines. Writers and artists agreed that their work was important but chafed at restrictions. Since the 1990s constraints on cultural life have eased, but because Chinese literature and culture now answer to the market rather than ideology some ask if it still matters. We will try to answer this question as we trace fifty years of developments in Chinese culture in their surprising complexity. We will look at developments in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, feature and documentary film, stage drama, television, popular music, visual art, and internet fiction. Students will undertake research projects, and we will discuss research methodology. (One Chinese course in literature or culture, or by waiver) 3 hrs. sem.

AAL LIT

Fall 2010, Spring 2013, Fall 2014

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CHNS 0360 - Intro To Lit Theory      

Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism
An overview of various literary theories and critical approaches to the reception and analysis of literary texts, this discussion-based seminar will introduce concerns central to Western literary theories while familiarizing students with contemporary critical terminology. From Aristotle's Poetics to postmodernism, from issues of "literariness," authorial intention, hermeneutics, and narrative angle to the premises and practices of Russian formalist, "new critical," structuralist, Freudian, Marxist, feminist approaches, etc., we will study short theoretical and critical essays in conjunction with literary works by Coleridge, Lu Xun, Dickens, Natsume Soseki, Henry James, Hwang Chunming, Borges, Kafka, and others. Narrative prose fiction is the main focus. Discussion-based, senior-junior seminar. (Minimum of three college-level literature courses required; priority enrollment given to seniors and juniors majoring in Chinese and Literary Studies, or by waiver) 3 hrs. sem.

Fall 2010

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CHNS 0361 - Ancient Poetics      

Ancient Poetics: China and the Greco-Roman World
In this course we will examine questions that have rankled human beings for millennia: What constitutes a great work of literature? What ends does it serve, and how does its structure aesthetically achieve these ends? While we will not endeavor to answer these questions definitively, we will explore theories of aesthetics elaborated in two of the world’s great literary traditions, the Chinese and the Greco-Roman. To what extent do these cultures’ answers resemble one another, and where do they diverge? Is poetic value culturally circumscribed, or do both traditions attempt to articulate universal norms, each within its unique context? Through close readings of primary texts, we will examine some of the guidelines ancient theorists established for the production of literature that not only expresses the author’s innermost sentiments but also—in Horace’s words—both pleases and instructs. Primary texts to be examined from the Chinese tradition include the Great Preface to the Book of Poetry, Lu Ji’s Poetic Exposition on Literature, and Liu Xie’s Literary Mind and the Carving of Dragons. Texts from the Western tradition include selections from Plato’s Republic, Aristotle’s Poetics, and Horace’s Art of Poetry. (Three college-level literature courses or approval of instructor) 3 hrs. sem.

CMP

Spring 2012

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CHNS 0370 - Traditional Chinese Novels      

Traditional Chinese Novels (in translation)
This seminar focuses on pre-modern Chinese full-length novels, which rose and matured during the Ming-Qing period. Students will read the "masterworks" of this genre, including Three Kingdoms (the epic deeds of heroes of the Chinese civil war of the second and third centuries), Outlaws of the Marsh (picaresque tales of Chinese Robin Hoods, as it were), The Journey to the West (a comic Buddhist-Daoist allegory better known in English as Monkey), The Plum in the Golden Vase (an erotic novel of manners), The Scholars (a social satire), and The Story of the Stone-The Dream of the Red Chamber (widely recognized as a masterpiece of world literature); all are beloved and long treasured by the Chinese. We will not only trace the evolution of classical Chinese novels and consider their literary significance and artistic value; the course will also aim to provide a richer and deeper understanding of traditional China, her history, society, culture, worldviews, beliefs, sense of humor, etc. (CHNS 0219, CHNS 0220, or CHNS 0250, or two Middlebury literature courses, or by approval of the instructor. CHNS 0219 strongly recommended.)

AAL LIT

Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013

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CHNS 0400 - Adv Chns Read/Wrtng/Convrstn      

Advanced Readings, Conversation, and Writing (Modern Chinese) (in Chinese)
This course is designed to improve students' competency in highly pragmatic Chinese, spoken and written. Readings and discussion will cover a wide variety of contemporary materials with an emphasis on linguistic preparation for study in China. (CHNS 0302 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect.

LNG

Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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CHNS 0405 - Confusions of Pleasure      

Confusions of Pleasure: Early Modern Culture in China and Europe
In this course we will explore how the social, economic, demographic, and technological transformations associated with early modernity inflected the visual, literary, and material cultures of Early Modern China and Europe. We will focus on internal phenomena and the influences of globalization. Through investigation of various genres and media, including painting, prints, drama, fiction, and porcelain, we seek to understand central cultural preoccupations of the age, including anxiety over imitation and falsification, the elevation of the exotic and peculiar, and the quest for authenticity. Readings in secondary literature will be paired with primary texts. To study selected primary texts in Chinese, register for INTL 0405B. This course is equivalent to INTL 0405 and HARC 0405. 3 hrs. sem.

AAL ART CMP

Fall 2011

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CHNS 0411 - Classical Chinese I      

Classical Chinese I (in Chinese)
This course is an introduction to wenyan, the written language of traditional China. In this course we will emphasize comprehension of the literal and metaphorical meanings of short wenyan texts. Our approach will include grammatical analysis and baihua translation (i.e., from the Classical Chinese into modern Chinese); discussion will be conducted entirely in baihua. This course begins the two-semester sequence of Classical Chinese, which not only introduces students to wenyan but also provides a vital learning experience for any student seeking to attain a high level of linguistic and cultural proficiency in Chinese, including modern written discourse. (CHNS 0302 or the equivalent) 3 hrs. lect.

LNG

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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CHNS 0412 - Classical Chinese II      

Classical Chinese II (in Chinese)
A continuation of CHNS 0411. In this course students will read a wide selection of wenyan texts that sample the classics of ancient Chinese thought, including Confucius' Analects, the Daoist texts Laozi and Zhuangzi, Mohist arguments against war, Sunzi's The Art of War, and Legalist writings on law. Students will also learn to punctuate wenyan texts (which were originally unpunctuated) and compose sentences or short paragraphs in wenyan. All class discussion will be conducted in modern Chinese. (CHNS 0411 or the equivalent) 3 hrs. lect.

LNG

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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CHNS 0425 - Chns Social Issues Adv Rdngs      

Contemporary Social Issues in China: Advanced Readings (in Chinese)
A survey of materials written in modern expository Chinese (academic, journalistic and polemical) that focus on the cultural, political, economic, and social issues of contemporary China. This advanced readings course is designed primarily for seniors who have already spent a semester or more studying and living in China or Taiwan. Emphasis will be given to further developing students' ability to read, analyze, and discuss complex issues in Mandarin while also advancing proficiency in writing and in oral comprehension. Oral reports and written compositions will be integral to the course's requirements. (Approval Required) 3 hrs. lect.

AAL LNG

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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CHNS 0426 - Chns Politics/Business Adv Rdg      

Politics and Business in China: Advanced Readings and Discussion (in Chinese)
The capstone course for those students who have attained a high level of Chinese language proficiency. The goal of this course is to help students improve their ability to read, write, and talk about politics and business in China. Most of this course will focus on recent and current debate and discussion in China over domestic political programs and policies, international relations, and business trends. Discussion will also touch upon the political and economic history of the People's Republic of China and Taiwan. We will read articles intended for popular audiences in the Chinese-speaking world. 3 hrs. lect. (CHNS 0425 or CHNS 0411 or study abroad in China)

AAL LNG

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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CHNS 0475 - Seminar Chinese Fiction      

Senior Seminar on Modern Chinese Literature (in Chinese)
A capstone course for all Chinese majors and for others who have attained a high level of Chinese language proficiency. Students will read and critique works by major Chinese fiction writers (and sometimes playwrights) and also see and discuss films from mainland China, Hong Kong, and/or Taiwan. All reading, discussion, and critical writing will be in Chinese. (CHNS 0412 or CHNS 0425) 3 hrs. lect.

AAL LIT LNG

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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CHNS 0500 - Independent Project      

Senior Essay
(Approval Required)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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CHNS 0700 - Senior Essay      

Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Fall 2014

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CHNS 0701 - Senior Thesis Research      

Senior Thesis Proposal
(Approval Required)

Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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CHNS 0702 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis
(Approval required).

WTR

Winter 2014

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