Middlebury

 

Brett Millier

Reginald L. Cook Professor of American Literature

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Phone: work802.443.5026
Office Hours: On Leave 2013-14
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Brett C. Millier is the Reginald L. Cook Professor of American Literature and Chair of the Department of English and American Literatures at Middlebury.  She has been at Middlebury since 1986, and her teaching interests include twentieth century American poetry and fiction, gender studies, Canadian literature, and critical writing and pedagogy. Ms. Millier is a graduate of Yale University (BA) and Stanford University (Ph.D.) She is the author of Elizabeth Bishop: Life and the Memory of It (U. of California Press) and, most recently, of Flawed Light: American Women Poets and Alcohol (U. of Illinois Press).  Her essays have appeared in Verse, the Kenyon Review, the New England Review, Contemporary Literature, and elsewhere.  She is currently at work on a critical biography of the poet Jean Garrigue (1912-1972).

 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

AMST 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2014

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AMST 0700 - Senior Essay      

Senior Essay
For students who have completed AMST 0400 and are not pursuing an honors thesis. Under the guidance of one or more faculty members, each student will complete research leading toward a one-term, one-credit interdisciplinary senior essay on some aspect of American culture. The essay is to be submitted no later than the last Thursday of the fall semester. (Select project advisor prior to registration)

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Spring 2012

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AMST 0710 - Honors Thesis      

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0705, and qualify to write two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013

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CMLT 0101 - Intro to World Literature      

Introduction to World Literature
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMP CW LIT

Spring 2012

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CRWR 0560 - Special Project: Writing      

Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

Fall 2012, Spring 2013

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CRWR 0701 - Senior Thesis:Creative Writing      

Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction. (Formerly ENAM 0701)

Spring 2013

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CRWR 0711 - Senior Thesis: Creative Writ.      

Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking two-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction. (Formerly ENAM 0711)

Spring 2013

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ENAM 0103 - Reading Literature      

Reading Literature
This course seeks to develop skills for the close reading of literature through discussion of and writing about selected poems, plays, and short stories. A basic vocabulary of literary terms and an introductory palette of critical methods will also be covered, and the course's ultimate goal will be to enable students to attain the literary-critical sensibility vital to further course work in the major. At the instructor's discretion, the texts employed in this class may share a particular thematic concern or historical kinship. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CW LIT

Fall 2012

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ENAM 0206 / AMST 0206 - 19th Century American Lit.      

Nineteenth-Century American Literature (II, AL)
This course will examine major developments in the literary world of 19th century America. Specific topics to be addressed might include the transition from Romanticism to Regionalism and Realism, the origins and evolution of the novel in the United States, and the tensions arising from the emergence of a commercial marketplace for literature. Attention will also be paid to the rise of women as literary professionals in America and the persistent problematizing of race and slavery. Among others, authors may include J. F. Cooper, Emerson, Melville, Douglass, Chopin, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Hawthorne, Stowe, Alcott, Wharton, and James. . 3 hrs. lect./disc.

LIT NOR

Fall 2011, Fall 2012

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ENAM 0210 / ENAM 0212 / AMST 0212 - American Modernists      

The American Modernists (AL)
American writers at the turn of the 20th century faced social, intellectual, and technological change on an unprecedented scale. Individually and collectively they worked to answer William Carlos Williams’s pressing question: “How can I be a mirror to this modernity?” In this course we will read, discuss, and write about poetry by writers such as Williams, T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, and Wallace Stevens; and prose by Henry Adams, Edith Wharton, Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Nella Larsen, Richard Wright, and others. (Not open to students who have taken ENAM 0207)

LIT NOR

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2014

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ENAM 0314 - Recent American Poetry      

Recent American Poetry
In this course we will examine the phenomenon of the "important" book of late 20th century American poetry, books that in some way changed how poetry was written and practiced in their time. In looking at the event of each publication, we will study not only individual poems, but also the way those poems are arranged in the volume, the moment in literary and cultural history when the book appeared, and how the book was received. Texts will include Lowell, Life Studies; Plath, Ariel; Berryman, 77 Dream Songs; Rich, The Dream of a Common Language; Snyder, Turtle Island; and Hejinian, My Life. 3 hrs. lect.

LIT NOR

Fall 2011

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ENAM 0431 - In The American Grain      

Senior Seminar: In the American Grain
How are the preoccupations of mid 19th century American literature reflected in the 20th and 21st centuries? In this seminar, we will read works by major U.S. authors with an eye to developing definitions for ourselves of “the American Grain” in modern and postmodern literature. Readings may include Emerson, Hawthorne, Williams, Faulkner, Pound, Stevens, Delillo, and Morrison, as well as a number of works of criticism. 3 hrs. sem/disc.

Fall 2010

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ENAM 0450 - Faulkner and His Influence      

Faulkner and His Influence (AL)
William Faulkner was extreme: the most radical formal innovator among the American Modernist novelists and an outrageous (and subtle) thinker about the complex social and racial history of the American south. In this course we will read Faulkner’s major works (As I Lay Dying; The Sound and the Fury; Light in August; Absalom, Absalom!; and Go Down, Moses) and works by Flannery O'Connor, Charles Johnson, and others influenced by Faulkner's style and vision. 3 hrs. sem.

LIT NOR

Spring 2013

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ENAM 0500 - Special Project: Lit      

Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Winter 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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ENAM 0560 - Special Project: Writing      

Special Project: Creative Writing
(Approval Required)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012

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ENAM 0700 - Senior Essay: Critical Writing      

Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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ENAM 0701 - Senior Essay: Creative Writing      

Senior Essay: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012

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ENAM 0710 - Senior Thesis: Critical Writ.      

Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking two-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the thesis workshop (ENAM 710z) in both Fall and Spring terms.

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Winter 2014

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ENAM 0711 - Senior Thesis: Creative Writ.      

Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking two-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012

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FYSE 1045 - Contemporary Canadian Fiction      

Contemporary Canadian Fiction
"To Americans, a bestseller in Canada is like a tree falling in the forest," said critic Ron Charles. In this seminar we will examine the richness of contemporary Canadian fiction in English, from Michael Ondaatje, Yann Martel, and Guy Vanderhaeghe; to Alice Munro, Alistair MacLeod, and Carol Shields, with special focus on the brilliant short story writers Canada has produced. We will examine the works themselves, as well as their relationship to U.S. and British literary traditions and institutions. We will also consider cultural differences between the United States and Canada and how culture affects literary production.3 hrs. sem./disc.

CMP CW LIT NOR

Fall 2010

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FYSE 1105 - The Poet's I      

CW LIT

Fall 2014

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