Middlebury

 

Louisa Stein

Assistant Professor of Film & Media Culture

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Phone: work802.443.5943
Office Hours: On-leave. Returns: Spring 2015
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Louisa Stein is Assistant Professor of Film and Media Culture at Middlebury College.Before coming to Middlebury, she headed the Critical Studies Area of the Television, Film, and New Media department at San Diego State University. She received her PhD from NYU's Department of Cinema Studies in 2006.

Louisa's work explores audience engagement in transmedia culture, with emphasis on questions of gender and generation. Her research investigates how meanings circulate across history, across media platforms and technologies, and between media producers and audiences. She has published on audiences and transmedia engagement in a range of journals and edited collections including Cinema Journal and the Flow TV Anthology. Her work considers both official and unofficial transmedia storytelling, ranging from the fan-authored Mad Men twitter network to the CW network's deployment of Second Life as a transmedia extension of the TV program Gossip Girl.

Louisa is co-editor of Teen Television: Programming and Fandom (McFarland, 2008), a collection that explores the multifaceted terrain of teen television programming. Her current book project, Millennial Media, explores the construct of the millennial generation in contemporary transmedia culture

Louisa’s courses include: Gender/Sexuality/Media, the History of Audiences, and Millennial Media.

 

 

Courses


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indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

FMMC 0101 - Aesthetics of the Moving Image      

Aesthetics of the Moving Image
How do films convey meaning, generate emotions, and work as an art form? What aspects of film are shared by television and videogames? This course is designed to improve your ability to watch, reflect on, and write about moving images. The course will be grounded in the analysis of cinema (feature films, documentaries, avant-garde, and animation) with special focus on film style and storytelling techniques. Study will extend to new audio-visual media as well, and will be considered from formal, cultural, and theoretical perspectives. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

ART

Spring 2011, Spring 2013

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FMMC 0104 / AMST 0104 - Television & American Culture      

Television and American Culture
This course explores American life in the last six decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to its future in digital convergence, we will consider television's role in both reflecting and constituting American society through a variety of approaches. Our topical exploration will consider the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of a variety of television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, and the medium's technological and social impacts. 2 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

NOR SOC

Spring 2012, Spring 2015

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FMMC 0254 / AMST 0254 - Millennial Media      

Millennial Media: Youth Audiences and Commercial Culture
Coming of age narratives speak to both youth audiences and adult viewers, and thus have a pervasive impact on popular culture. In this course, we will explore the commercial construct of the "millennial generation," a generation imagined to span those born from the late 1970s through 2000. We will consider how representations of adolescents circulate in American film, television, and digital media texts such as Harry Potter and Glee, examining their industrial contexts and their audience response. We will interrogate trade and popular publications seeking to define millennials, and consider the social significance of generational discourse more broadly. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0104 or AMST 0211) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen.

ART NOR

Spring 2011, Spring 2012

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FMMC 0267 / GSFS 0267 / WAGS 0267 - Gender, Sexuality and Media      

Gender and Sexuality in Media
In this course, we will explore the intersecting roles played by gender and sexuality in our media, focusing specifically on film, television, and digital culture. We will examine the multiple ways in which popular media texts construct and communicate gender and sexuality, and we will analyze the role of gender and sexuality in the processes of spectatorship and meaning-making. We will study a wide range of theories of gender and sexuality in media including feminist film theory, queer media theory, and literature on gender and sexuality in video game history and culture. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen.

SOC

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Spring 2015

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FMMC 0276 - Remix Culture      

Remix Culture
With the spread of digital technologies, remix has come to the forefront as a major form of artistic work and cultural and political commentary. In this course we will explore the history, cultural and legal impact, and creative logics of remix traditions. We will examine how digital technologies shape transformative creativity. Drawing on the work of theorists such as DJ Spooky and Lawrence Lessig, we will consider the creative and legal ramifications of remix logics. We will explore a range of remix works across media with a focus on video. Students will also produce remixes through individual and group work. 3 hrs. lecture/3 hrs. screening

ART NOR SOC

Fall 2012

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FMMC 0358 / WAGS 0358 - Theories of Spectatorship      

Theories of Spectatorship, Audience, and Fandom
In this course we will explore a range of theoretical approaches to the study of spectatorship and media audiences. How has the viewer been theorized throughout the history of film, television, and digital media? How have theoretical understandings of the relationship between viewer and media changed in the digital age? How have gender, class, and race informed cultural notions of media audiences from silent cinema to today? We will consider key theoretical readings and approaches to studying spectators, viewers, audiences, fans, and anti-fans across the history of the moving image. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102 or FMMC 0104 or FMMC 0254) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. screen.

ART CW NOR SOC

Spring 2013

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FMMC 0431 - Film & Media Senior Seminar:      

Film & Media Senior Seminar:
Topic is determined by the instructor - refer to section for the course description.

Fall 2010

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FMMC 0507 - Independent Project      

Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites.

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Winter 2014

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FMMC 0707 - Senior Independent Work      

Senior Honors Project in Film and Media Culture
During the first term of their senior year, students with a GPA of A- in film and media culture courses may apply to undertake a senior project (FMMC 0707) for honors, with the project to be completed the last term of the senior year.

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Winter 2013, Winter 2014

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FMMC 1015 - Remix Culture      

Remix Culture
With the spread of digital technologies, remix has come to the forefront as a major form of artistic work and of cultural and political commentary. We will examine how digital technologies shape transformative creativity. Drawing on the work of theorists such as DJ Spooky and Lawrence Lessig, we will consider the creative and legal ramifications of remix logics. We will explore a range of remix works across media, with a focus on video remix. Students will also produce remixes through individual and group work.

ART NOR SOC WTR

Winter 2012

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FYSE 1342 - Creativity in the Digital Age      

Creativity in the Digital Age
How have the digital tools of contemporary culture shifted notions of creativity and originality? In this course we will examine digital authorship in remix culture, fan culture, and cross-media production. We will explore shifts in notions of author and audience as they play out in online sites like Facebook, Livejournal, Youtube, and Twitter. We will read academic and popular writing addressing these questions, and students will also investigate questions of digital culture through creative production. Class work will include primary and secondary research, analytic writing, blogging, and video remix. 3 hrs. sem/3 hrs. screening

CW SOC

Fall 2011

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