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Carrie Anderson

Asst. Professor of History of Art & Architecture

 
 work(802) 443-5051
 Fall Term 2020- Tuesday 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Wednesday 2:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m., and by appointment
 Mahaney Arts Center 117

Carrie Anderson has been teaching in the Department of the History of Art & Architecture at Middlebury College since the fall of 2014.  She received her PhD from Boston University, where she wrote her dissertation on the acquisition and dissemination of the Brazilian collection of Johan Maurits, the governor-general of Dutch Brazil from 1637 to 1644.

Carrie’s primary area of specialization is seventeenth-century Dutch Art, within which she focuses on themes related to inter- and intracultural diplomacy and exchange.  Her work has been published in the Journal of Early Modern History, Artl@s, and Early Modern Low Countries.  Carrie’s first book, The Art of Diplomacy in the Early Modern Netherlands: Gift-giving at Home and Abroad, is under contract with Amsterdam University Press. Support for her research and teaching has been provided by grants from the Ada Howe Kent Foundation, the Historians of Netherlandish Art, and the Fulbright Program, the latter enabling her to teach courses at the University of Amsterdam and complete book-related research and writing in the Netherlands during her 2018/2019 sabbatical year. 

Carrie’s interest in digital art history—especially digital mapping—began as a fellow at the Kress Summer Institute on Digital Mapping & Art History held at Middlebury College in 2014. Since then, she has attended and participated in numerous digital humanities conferences and workshops (with support from Middlebury’s DLA initiative) and in 2017 published a literature review on digital mapping and the humanities in the Journal of Tourism History.   She also co-edited a special issue of Journal18 (with Nancy Um, Binghamton University), titled Digital Mapping & Eighteenth-Century Visual, Material, and Built Cultures. Carrie is currently the co-leader (with Marsely Kehoe, Hope College) of a digital art history project titled, “From Batavia to the Gold Coast: Mapping Textile Circulation in the Dutch Global Market.” 

At Middlebury, Carrie has taught courses on seventeenth-century Dutch art, the global baroque, early modern patronage, printmaking in the seventeenth-century Dutch Republic, and the arts of Spain and the Spanish Americas.  She also co-curated the exhibition “A Story of Art: Gifts and Bequests from Charles Moffett ’67 and Lucinda Herrick” with the students from her 2017 winter term course.

     

 

Courses

Course List: 

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

FYSE 1186 - Printmaking/Time of Rembrandt      

Printmaking in the Time of Rembrandt
In this course we will study a selection of seventeenth-century Dutch prints from the collection of the Middlebury College Museum of Art, which includes etchings and engravings by artists such as Hendrick Golztius, Rembrandt van Rijn, Adriaen van Ostade, Nicolaes Berchem, and Cornelis Dusart, among others. Students will learn and write about the history of printmaking in the Dutch Republic by working virtually with the objects in the collection, as well as other primary and secondary sources. Students in this course will also write short essays to be included in an online catalogue of the Museum’s collection of seventeenth-century Dutch prints. 3 hrs. sem. ART CW EUR

Fall 2020

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HARC 0100 - Monuments/Ideas in Western Art      

Monuments and Ideas in Western Art
This course is an introduction to the study of Western art history through an investigation of selected art works, considered individually and in broader contexts. The course chronicles the evolution in painting, sculpture, and architecture of the western world. It is designed for those who wish to build a broad acquaintance with the major works and ideas of Western art in their historical settings and to develop tools for understanding these works of art as aesthetic objects and bearers of meaning for the societies, groups, or individuals that produced them. Registration priority will be given to first and second year students. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. ART EUR HIS

Spring 2017, Spring 2018, Spring 2020, Spring 2021

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HARC 0254 - Art in the Dutch Golden Age      

Art in the Dutch Golden Age
In this course we will examine the art made in the Northern Netherlands during the 17th century, the so-called “Golden Age” of the Dutch Republic. We will consider the effects of politics, patronage, religion, and warfare on the paintings and practices of such artists as Hals, Rembrandt, and Vermeer, as well as many other lesser-known professionals, who specialized in still life, landscapes, seascapes, cityscapes, church interiors, portraits, and tavern scenes. We will also consider the history of printmaking in the early modern Dutch Republic. 3 hrs. lect. ART EUR HIS

Fall 2019, Spring 2021

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HARC 0301 - Ways of Seeing      

Ways of Seeing
In this course we will focus on the various methods and theories that can enrich and deepen our understanding of art, architecture, and visual culture. Students will hone their analytical skills, both verbal and written, often with recourse to objects from the College Museum and the campus at large. In general, this seminar will develop students’ awareness of objects of culture broadly construed, and sharpen their understanding of the scope and intellectual history of the field. To be taken during the sophomore or junior year as a prerequisite for HARC 0710 and HARC 0711. 3 hrs. sem. ART CW

Fall 2017, Fall 2019

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HARC 0313 - Arts of Spain/Spanish Americas      

From Velázquez to Cabrera: The Arts of Spain and the Spanish Americas
In this course we will examine the art and visual culture of Spain and the Spanish Americas from the early sixteenth to the early nineteenth century. We will consider the impact that religion, politics, and patronage had on artists working in Spain and the Viceroyalties of New Spain and Peru, focusing especially on how visual traditions, iconographies, and practices were reshaped when they crossed the Atlantic. We will also consider how—in the wake of global trade and exploration—contact between Amerindian, African, Asian, and European artisans transformed artistic production, patronage, and collecting practices throughout the Iberian world. 3 hrs. sem. ART CMP HIS

Spring 2017, Spring 2018, Spring 2020

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HARC 0510 - Advanced Studies      

Advanced Studies
Supervised independent work in art history, museum studies, or architectural studies. (Approval Required)

Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021

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HARC 0710 - Senior Thesis Research Seminar      

Senior Thesis Research Seminar
In this course students will conceive, undertake research, and plan the organization of their senior thesis in art history or senior museum studies projects. Seminar discussions and workshops will focus on research strategies, conventions in art historical writing, project design, and public presentation skills. (HARC 0301; Approval Required) 3 hr. sem.

Fall 2017

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HARC 1022 - Prints, Drawings, Photos      

Prints, Drawings, and Photographs from the Middlebury College Museum of Art
In this course we will study the prints, drawings, and photographs given to the Middlebury College Museum of Art by Charles S. Moffett, ‘67. Charles Moffett was formerly curator of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the National Gallery of Art, director of the Phillips Collection, and officer at Sotheby’s. Students will conduct research on the collection, which includes objects from the 17th to the 21st centuries, and select a number of works to be included in a fall 2017 exhibition. In addition to studying and contextualizing these works, students will visit collections in other museums. ART HIS WTR

Winter 2017

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HARC 1030 - Printmaking/Time of Rembrandt      

Printmaking in the Time of Rembrandt
In this course we will study a selection of seventeenth-century Dutch prints from the collection of the Middlebury College Museum of Art, which includes etchings and engravings by artists such as Hendrick Golztius, Rembrandt van Rijn, Adriaen van Ostade, Nicolaes Berchem, and Cornelis Dusart, among others. In this hands-on course students will learn how to research and write catalogue entries for a selection of these works by engaging directly with the objects in the collection. By the end of the course, we will produce a small catalogue featuring our short essays. ART EUR WTR

Winter 2020

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HARC 1230 - DataScience Across Disciplines      

Data Science Across Disciplines
In this course we will gain exposure to the entire data science pipeline—obtaining and cleaning large and messy data sets, exploring these data and creating meaningful visualizations, and communicating insights from the data in a meaningful manner. During morning sessions, students will attend a combined lecture where they will learn the tools and techniques required to explore new and exciting data sets. During afternoon sessions, students will break out into smaller groups to apply these tools to domain-specific research projects in Art History, Biology, Economics, or Japanese and Linguistics.
Students enrolled in Professor Abe’s (Japanese) afternoon section will use the tools of data science to create visualizations of social and emotive meanings that surface through Japanese language/culture materials. Participants will use these visualizations to engage in various theoretical and pedagogical topics pertaining to (educational) linguistics.
Students enrolled in Professor Allen’s (Biology) afternoon section will use the tools of data science to investigate the drivers of tick abundance and tick-borne disease risk. To do this students will draw from a nation-wide ecological database.
Students enrolled in Professor Anderson’s (History of Art and Architecture) afternoon section will use the tools of data science to create interactive visualizations of the Dutch textile trade in the early eighteenth century. These visualizations will enable users to make connections between global trade patterns and representations of textiles in paintings, prints, and drawings.
Students enrolled in Professor Myers’ (Economics) afternoon section will use the tools of data science to create an interactive visualization of the landscape of abortion policy and access in the United States. This visualization will allow users to explore how abortion access varies across the country and how this variation in turn correlated with demographic, health, and economic outcomes.
This course will utilize the R programming language. No prior experience in statistics, data science, programming, art history, biology, economics, or Japanese is necessary. ART DED EUR WTR

Winter 2021

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