Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

HARC 0100 - Monuments/Ideas in Western Art      

Monuments and Ideas in Western Art
This course is an introduction to the study of Western art history through an investigation of selected art works, considered individually and in broader contexts. The course chronicles the evolution in painting, sculpture, and architecture of the western world. It is designed for those who wish to build a broad acquaintance with the major works and ideas of Western art in their historical settings and to develop tools for understanding these works of art as aesthetic objects and bearers of meaning for the societies, groups, or individuals that produced them. Registration priority will be given to first and second year students. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. ART EUR HIS

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017

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HARC 0102 - Monuments and Ideas/Asian Art      

Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art*
This course is an introduction to the study of Asian art history through an investigation of selected art works, considered individually and in broader contexts. This course chronicles the evolution in painting, sculpture, and architecture, and other media of Asia. It is designed for those who wish to build a broad acquaintance with the major works and ideas of Asian art in their historical settings and to develop tools for understanding these works of art as aesthetic objects and bearers of meaning for the societies, group, or individuals that produced them. Registration priority given to first and second year students. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.. AAL ART CMP HIS

Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015, Fall 2016

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HARC 0120 - DesignLab: Creating Innovation      

DesignLab: Creating Innovation
In this course students will explore the fundamental principles of design thinking and creative innovation. We will pursue all aspects of the design process, from discerning opportunities and researching solutions to developing concepts and generating prototypes. We will explore design approaches from the renowned Bauhaus to those offered today by digital development and fabrication, including 3-D printing. Students will participate in workshops, conduct individual projects, work in teams, and make presentations on implementing their designs. We will also engage in discussions of how their designs affect the environmental and ethical aspects of our increasingly global and digital world. 3 hrs. lect ART

Fall 2014, Fall 2015, Fall 2016

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HARC 0130 - Intro. to Architectural Design      

Introduction to Architectural Design
This studio course introduces students to the practices and methodologies of architectural design and its related disciplines. The goal of the course is to use the process of architectural design itself to generate insight into individual and community value systems in the realms of culture and technology. Through a series of design exercises students will learn to analyze and synthesize architecture as a problem-solving artistic discipline. The course is recommended for anyone wishing to improve their appreciation of the built environment.  A daily journal and intensive group and individual work within the studio space, both during class time and in addition to it, are an integral part of the course. ART

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017

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HARC 0201 - Italian Renaissance      

Italian Renaissance Art: 1350-1550
This course will focus on the art produced in Italy during the late fourteenth through the early sixteenth centuries. In addition to studying the chronological development of painting, sculpture, and architecture, we will consider such issues as artistic training, patronage, domestic life, and the literary achievements of this period of "rebirth." Focusing on urban environments such as Florence, Siena, Padua, Venice, Rome, and Urbino, we will give special attention to the manner in which artistic production was shaped by place. 3 hrs. lect. ART EUR HIS

Spring 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015, Fall 2016

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HARC 0202 - Modern Art      

Modern Art
In this course we will survey the major movements and artists in the history of modern art in Europe and the United States, from Impressionism to the postwar period. We will focus on the development of style, aesthetic concerns, and social contexts. Topics will include individual artists, such as Picasso and Matisse, as well as the development of styles, such as Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art. 3 hrs. lect. ART EUR HIS

Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Fall 2015

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HARC 0204 - Approaches to Islamic Art      

Approaches to Islamic Art
A survey of major expressions of Islamic art from the inception of Islam to the present, from all parts of the Islamic world. This is not a traditional survey; rather, it focuses on key monuments and important examples of portable and decorative arts: mosques, tombs, palaces, manuscript illumination, calligraphy, metalwork, textiles, ceramics, etc. We will consider their meanings and functions in their respective socio-historical contexts, and we will also analyze the impact of patronage and region. We will try to understand what general principles unify the richness and diversity of Islamic art: what is Islamic about Islamic art? Finally, we will address the issue of contemporary Islamic art. (No prerequisites). 3 hrs. lect. AAL ART

Spring 2014, Spring 2016

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HARC 0209 - Venice in the Renaissance      

Venice in Renaissance
Venetian art was long shaped by its unique setting, distinctive political structure, and a collective identity enforced by its patrician leaders. In this course, we will engage in a close consideration of the socio-political conditions that both reinforced tradition and ultimately made way for a "golden age" in Venetian painting, sculpture, and architecture. Topics will include individual artists, such as Bellini, Giorgione, Titian, and Palladio, as well as artistic training and workshop practice, patronage, and the rise of Venetian humanism. 3 hrs. lect. ART EUR HIS

Fall 2013

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HARC 0211 - American Design      

American Design
A historical survey of architecture and related design (especially furniture) in the United States from its colonization through the mid-twentieth century as a manifestation of colonial inheritances, foreign fashions, national outlooks, changing technologies, social and economic patterns, and native materials. 3 hrs. lect. ART HIS NOR

Fall 2013, Spring 2015

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HARC 0214 - Northern Renaissance Art      

Northern Renaissance Art: The Rhetoric of the Real
This course will provide students with an overview of art objects created in a variety of media in Northern Europe between the 15th and 16th centuries. We will analyze the changing uses of art in cultures where people defined themselves and the depths of their piety in relation to their material wealth and social standing. During the last few weeks of the semester, the class will look at the emergence of genre painting and the representation of peasant life. We will consider how these phenomena were tied to the histories and careers of individual artists and their workshops. General questions will include: How does the convincing representation of "reality" make for a persuasive image? What are the benefits of fusing secular and religious subject matter? Is it valid to speak of a new artistic self-awareness? 3 hrs. lect. ART EUR HIS

Spring 2013, Spring 2015, Spring 2017

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HARC 0216 - Medieval Art      

The Power of the Image in the Middle Ages
We live in a society saturated with images, but in the medieval period the average person encountered pictures only within a limited range of contexts. In this course we will examine architecture, sculpture, illuminated manuscripts, and luxury artworks of the fifth through the 15th centuries in Europe and will consider the significances these works held for their original viewers. Key topics include: the image in Christian devotion, the role of the luxury arts in royal propaganda, the use of the image to crystallize stereotypes, and the status of the female figure as embodiment of positive and negative forces. 3 hrs. lect. ART EUR HIS

Fall 2012

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HARC 0218 - History of Photography      

History of Photography
In this course we will consider the history of photography as a medium from its inception in 1839 to the present. We will focus on technological advances in photography, aesthetic developments, and the evolution of acceptance of photography as an art form. We will examine the use of photography in different genres, such as landscape, portraiture, and documentation. To illustrate our study, we will rely on examples of photographs available in the Middlebury College Museum of Art. 3 hrs. lect. ART NOR

Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2015, Spring 2016

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HARC 0219 - Early Medieval &Romanesque Art      

Understanding Early Medieval and Romanesque Art: Seeing Ste. Foy
This course is an introduction to key artworks and architectural monuments made and built in Europe during the eighth through twelfth centuries. We will study such structures as Charlemagne's Palace Chapel and the reliquary statue of Ste. Foy at Conques to explore how these monuments were products of independent cultures that valued the creation of a visual fusion between the Judeo-Christian God and humankind. Likely lines of inquiry include: the persistence of a Classical ideal and its myriad adaptations; the coordination of art objects to specific locations; and, not least, the self-conscious staging of political and ecclesiastical power. 3 hrs lect. ART EUR HIS

Fall 2013, Spring 2017

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HARC 0220 - Art of the City      

The Art of the City
A study of humanity's most complex and critical physical monument, from ancient agoras to edge cities. City form in general (historical and ideal) and great cities, urban environments, and city designers in particular will be surveyed from antiquity to the present in an investigation of changing purposes, elements, and organization. 3 hrs. lect. ART HIS

Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2015

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HARC 0221 - Greek Art & Archaeology      

Greek Art and Archaeology
This course explores the artistic expression in architecture, urbanism, sculpture, and painting in the ancient Greek world (Greece, Sicily, southern Italy, and western Turkey). The chronological range spans from the late Neolithic period and the Aegean Bronze Age (with its Cycladic, Minoan, and Mycenaean civilizations) to the formative archaic period, the classical moment during the age of Perikles, and the cosmopolitan Hellenistic age, ending with the advent of Imperial Rome in 31 BC. Special emphasis will be placed on how Greek art production related to developments in politics, history, literature, and science. 3 hrs. lect. ART EUR HIS

Spring 2013

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HARC 0227 - Indian Painting      

Poetry, Piety and Power: Indian Painting 1200-Present
This course considers the history, context, style, and significance of a broad spectrum of Indian painting traditions. We will look closely at Jaina and Hindu religious illustrations, the evocative courtly and religious imagery from the Rajput and other regional kingdoms, the extraordinarily refined and naturalistic Mughal imagery, the influence of colonialism, and the development of modern and contemporary works. 3 hrs. lect. AAL ART HIS

Spring 2015

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HARC 0230 - Modern Architecture      

Modern Architecture
Rotating skyscrapers, green roofs, and avant-garde museums: how did we arrive in the architectural world of the early 21st century? In this course we will survey the major stylistic developments, new building types, and new technologies that have shaped European and American architecture since the late 18th century. Students will learn about the work of major architects as well as key architectural theories and debates. Special emphasis will be placed on the cultural and political contexts in which buildings are designed. 2 hrs. Lect./1 hr. disc. ART HIS

Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015, Spring 2016, Spring 2017

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HARC 0231 - Architecture & Environment      

Architecture and the Environment
Architecture has a dynamic relationship with the natural and cultural environments in which it operates. As a cultural phenomenon it impacts the physical landscape and uses natural resources while it also frames human interaction, harbors community, and organizes much of public life. We will investigate those relationships and explore strategies to optimize them, in order to seek out environmentally responsive architectural solutions. Topics to be covered include: analysis of a building's site as both natural and cultural contexts, passive and active energy systems, principles of sustainable construction, and environmental impact. Our lab will allow us to study on site, "off-the-grid" dwellings, hay-bale houses, passive solar constructions and alternative communities, meet with "green" designers, architects, and builders, and do hands-on projects. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. ART

Fall 2012, Spring 2014, Spring 2015, Spring 2016

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HARC 0233 - How Asian Art is Made      

Potter, Painter, and Goldsmith: How Asian Art is Made
In this seminar, we will explore the manner in which the distinctive artistic traditions of China, Korea, and Japan were shaped by the materials and techniques available to ancient craftsmen. Through observation of objects from the Middlebury Museum of Art, we will explore such questions as, “How was Asian art made? Why it is made that way? What was its historical impact?” Topics will include jade and hardstones, bronze, textiles, ceramics, painting, lacquer, glass, and gold. This course requires no prior experience in art history or Asian studies and is ideally suited to students who wish to learn more about art, Asian history, or conservation science. 3 hrs. lect. AAL ART CW HIS

Fall 2015

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HARC 0236 - Cities of Vesuvius      

Cities of Vesuvius
The Bay of Naples was an international cultural crossroads in antiquity. Prominent in Classical mythology and first colonized by the Greeks at Cumae and Neapolis, the Roman cities of Pompeii, Herculaneum, and Baiae later flourished there, favored by the rich and powerful. We will study the history, arts, politics, religion, and commerce of these various cities, 800 BCE - 100 CE. Readings will include ancient authors in translation and secondary sources. The environment (geology, seismology) will receive special emphasis as it led to the cataclysmic eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 CE, which doomed Pompeii and altered the landscape forever. 3 hrs. lect. ART EUR HIS

Fall 2015

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HARC 0238 - Japanese Art      

Japanese Art
In this introductory survey we will explore the arts of Japan from the Neolithic Jōmon period to the post-war era of the 20th century. Using assigned readings in conjunction with objects in our own museum collection, we will investigate how these artworks and monuments reflect the agendas, religious beliefs, and aesthetic tastes of the artists and patrons who created them. We will also explore themes such as advances in media and technology, the role of nationalism in art production, and indigenous versus imported artistic developments. 3 hrs. lect. AAL ART

Spring 2016

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HARC 0246 - American Painting to 1920      

American Painting: Beginnings to the Armory Show
This course is an introduction to American painting from 17th century limner portraits to the rise of modernism in the twentieth century, with special attention to Copley, Cole, Church, Homer, Eakins, Sloan, and Bellows. Although we will trace the development of traditional categories of painting (landscape, portraiture, genre), our purpose will be to discover what the paintings tell us about the changing values and tastes of American culture. (Formerly HARC/AMCV 0246) 3 hrs. lect. ART HIS NOR

Spring 2014

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HARC 0247 - Impressionism/Post-Impression      

Impressionism and Post-Impressionism
In this course we will examine the Impressionist and Post-Impressionist movements that evolved in France during the second half of the 19th century. Looking at artists such as Manet, Degas, Cassatt, and Monet, as well as Cézanne, Van Gogh, Seurat, and Gauguin, we will place their work in social and historical contexts that include the rise of the city, new opportunities for leisure, demographic change, and the breakdown of artistic establishments. When appropriate we will compare visual artistic production to parallel developments in literature and music. 3 hrs. lect. ART EUR HIS

Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015

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HARC 0248 - Gold/Sex/Death at the Museum      

Gold, Sex, and Death at the Museum
Most visitors to museums notice the architecture, carefully chosen collections, and meticulously curated special exhibitions. However, behind this façade is a busy network of museum professionals coordinating every aspect of the institution’s life. Through readings and guest lectures, we will explore how directors, curators, and staff navigate the challenges facing the modern museum, such as establishing acquisitions policies in an increasingly uncertain art market, defining ethical standards for conservation, and addressing audiences with ever-changing needs. Speakers such as a curator, art critic, and conservator will contribute to our discussion, and attendance at a series of public talks is required. 3 hrs. lect./disc. NOR

Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Spring 2016, Fall 2016

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HARC 0249 - Art&Courtly Powr/Early Mod Eur      

Art and Courtly Power in Early Modern Europe
From incest and assassinations to the noble pursuits of hunting and humanistic studies, the lives of sovereigns and their entourages at Renaissance and Baroque courts were varied and colorful. In this course we will explore the subjects and modes of art created for the enjoyment of secular princes and how they function as a tool of statecraft to consolidate their power. We will investigate urbanism and the styles and iconography of art and architecture at courts in Italy, Spain, France, Austria, and England. We will pay particular attention to the lives of courtiers, female artists, and other women. 3 hrs. lect/disc. ART EUR HIS

Fall 2012

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HARC 0251 - Court, Castle, & Cathedral      

Court, Castle, and Cathedral: The Gothic World
This survey course will consider closely the major architectural monuments of the Gothic period in Western Europe, using them as a point of departure in a larger consideration of the artistic culture of this time. In looking at Gothic art and architecture, the class will ask some of the following questions: How were buildings embedded in the promotion of distinct political programs? How do liturgical considerations determine the shapes of buildings and sites? How can we track the emergence of a non-Christian "other" in art of all media? How can we characterize the visual and intellectual culture of "courtly love"? 3 hrs. lect. ART EUR HIS

Spring 2014

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HARC 0252 - Producing Contemporary Art      

Producing Contemporary Art
In this project-based course, we will write, edit, design, and publish an art magazine. Through these varied elements of conceptualization and production, students will research aspects of contemporary art in the early 21st century, asking such questions as: Who decides what gets called “art”? How can we define—and how does one participate in—the art world? How do we, as consumers and critics, make sense of this shifting intellectual, cultural, and financial landscape? Through a combination of individual and collaborative work, we will both investigate and contribute to a vital sector of contemporary culture. Professor Vazquez will assist with the course planning and will serve as an editor-at-large for the student’s publication project, offering feedback on the project at different stages of completion. 3 hrs. sem. ART

Fall 2015

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HARC 0253 - Painting in the Baroque      

Painting and Passion in Baroque Art
Bernini, Velázquez, Poussin, Rubens, and Rembrandt--in this course, we will examine the major artists from Italy, Spain, France, and the Low Countries. From love affairs to bankruptcy, from murder to high acclaim, we will study the colorful lives of these intriguing artists as well as their dramatic works of art within their 17th century social and political contexts. 3 hrs. lect/disc. ART EUR HIS

Spring 2013

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HARC 0254 - Art in the Dutch Golden Age      

Art in the Dutch Golden Age
In this course we will examine the art made in the Northern Netherlands during the 17th century, the so-called “Golden Age” of the Dutch Republic. We will consider the effects of politics, patronage, religion, and warfare on the paintings and practices of such artists as Hals, Rembrandt, and Vermeer, as well as many other lesser-known professionals, who specialized in still life, landscapes, seascapes, cityscapes, church interiors, portraits, and tavern scenes. We will also consider the history of printmaking in the early modern Dutch Republic. 3 hrs. lect. ART EUR HIS

Fall 2014, Fall 2016

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HARC 0260 - Contemporary Art      

Contemporary Art: From Postmodernism to Globalization
In this course we will survey major developments in international art practice since 1960. We will discuss artists and movements from North and South America, Asia, Eastern and Western Europe, and the Middle East. We will explore debates in traditional media, as well as the emergence of new conceptual paradigms, video and film, land art, installation and institutional critique, and strategies of appropriation. In addition to a focus on formal concerns, students will also discuss broader debates active in various spheres of postwar art and culture. Readings will include artist statements, critical and historical texts, as well as important theoretical material. ART CMP HIS

Fall 2012, Spring 2015, Spring 2016, Spring 2017

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HARC 0265 - Modern Latin American Art      

Twentieth Century Latin American Art
In this course we will survey major developments in the art of Latin America from 1890 to the present. We will explore the rise of avant-gardism and abstraction, Mexican muralism, surrealism, kinetic art, neo-concrete art, and conceptualism, as well as the interaction between Latin Americans artists and their European and North American counterparts. We will also study the work of individual artists such as Diego Rivera, Joaquín Torres García, Wilfredo Lam, and Lygia Clark, among others. Readings will be drawn from artist's writings, criticism, primary documents, and recent art historical scholarship. AAL ART CMP HIS

Spring 2013

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HARC 0266 - Contemporary Latin America Art      

Art of Latin America Since 1950
In this course we will survey the art of Latin America since 1950. We will study the works of leading Latin American artists active in their native countries and abroad, considering major developments such as the rise of abstraction, conceptualism, and postmodernism. We will also explore significant issues that have shaped the production and reception of the region’s art, such as strategies used by Latin American artists to resist or reinterpret artistic discourses in order to negotiate local and international trends. Readings will be drawn from Jacqueline Barnitz’s Twentieth-Century Art of Latin America, artist's writings, criticism, and art historical scholarship. 3 hrs. lect. AAL ART HIS

Spring 2014

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HARC 0270 - Chinese Art      

Chinese Art
This course is an introductory survey of the arts of China from the Neolithic period to the 20th century. Considering works in their original context and in museum collections, we will investigate how art objects and monuments reflect the religious beliefs, political agendas, and aesthetic preferences of their creators. At the same time, we will pay particular attention to the local development of artistic technologies, the role of ethnic and national identity in art production, and China's place in the larger histories of the Silk Road and modern international commerce and diplomacy. 3 hrs. lect. AAL ART HIS

Spring 2013, Spring 2015, Spring 2017

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HARC 0271 - Funerary Arts of East Asia      

Funerary Arts of East Asia
What is the purpose of a tomb? How do its structure and décor convey ancient perceptions of death? Who are the occupants, and how did they envision their journey into the afterlife? This course is an introductory survey of the funerary arts of China, Korea, and Japan. By investigating tombs, shrines, sarcophagi, wall paintings, and grave goods throughout East Asia, we will gain a deeper understanding of ancient religions, social structures, ethnic identities, and cross-cultural interactions. Lectures will be supplemented by several visits to the Museum's Asian collections. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL ART HIS

Spring 2014

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HARC 0281 - Controversies in AmArt&Museums      

Viewer Discretion Advised: Controversies in American Art & Museums, 1876-Present
What are the “culture wars,” and why do they matter? What ideas are considered too “obscene” for American audiences? In this course we will explore controversies and scandals sparked by public displays of art in the U.S. including: Eakins’s Gross Clinic (1876), seen as too “bloody” for an art exhibition; the U.S. Navy’s objections to Paul Cadmus’s painting of sailors (1934); censorship and NEA budget cuts (Mapplethorpe & Serrano, 1989); backlash to The West as America’s deconstruction of myths of the frontier (1991); tensions surrounding Colonial Williamsburg’s “slave auction” reenactment (1994); debates over the continued display (and occasional defacement) of Confederate monuments in the era of the Black Lives Matter Movement. 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART HIS NOR

Spring 2017

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HARC 0285 - Mapping Conceptualism      

Mapping Conceptualism: Art and Idea in International Context
In this course we will explore the impact of conceptualism—the notion that an ‘idea’ takes priority over an artwork’s physical form—in a range of historical and geographic contexts from the 1960s forward. Beginning with foundational texts and objects, we will then explore the reach of conceptualist practices through close readings of art and artists in the context of specific artistic milieux and exhibitions from the Americas to Asia. Classes will be a mixture of lecture and more focused discussion. No prerequisites, but some exposure to modern and/or contemporary art is desirable. ART CMP HIS

Fall 2016

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HARC 0301 - Ways of Seeing      

Ways of Seeing
In this course we will focus on the various methods and theories that can enrich and deepen our understanding of art, architecture, and visual culture. Students will hone their analytical skills, both verbal and written, often with recourse to objects from the College Museum and the campus at large. In general, this seminar will develop students’ awareness of objects of culture broadly construed, and sharpen their understanding of the scope and intellectual history of the field. To be taken during the sophomore or junior year as a prerequisite for HARC 0710 and HARC 0711. 3 hrs. sem. ART

Winter 2013, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017

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HARC 0305 - Arts Comparison: East/West      

Arts in Comparison: East/West
In this course we will compare and contrast specific works of Asian and European art to explore the historical, religious, and social underpinnings of these respective artistic traditions. Artistic exchanges between East and West, from antiquity to the present, will also be discussed in order to understand how the varying traditions encountered, responded to one another, and produced new forms of art. Topics will include images of Christ and the Buddha, paradise and hell, landscape paintings, gardens, Orientalism and Japonisme, and Gothic Lolita fashion. 3 hrs. lect/disc. ART CMP HIS

Spring 2013

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HARC 0306 - Medieval Manuscripts      

Materiality and Meaning in Medieval Manuscripts
Before the invention of the printing press in the middle of the fifteenth century, all books were written by hand, a manual process that informed the term “manuscript.” The most luxurious of medieval manuscripts were illuminated with all manner of images, and these, along with the books themselves, were often understood as embodiments of divine wisdom. In this seminar we will consider medieval manuscripts as artworks and study the history of medieval manuscript illumination. Along the way, we will analyze the functions of various types of texts, learn about the rich relationships between text and image, consider the emergence of silent reading, and study the diverse audiences for medieval books. Over the course of the roughly one thousand years that we will cover in this course, we will see the book change from a mysterious receptacle of sacred wisdom to a commodity created for a mass market. 3 hrs. sem. ART EUR

Fall 2014

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HARC 0309 - Global Baroque      

Global Baroque
The Baroque style of art and architecture that flourished in 17th century Europe and spread throughout the rest of the world is often referred to as the first truly global style. In this course we will examine the spread of the Baroque throughout Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Africa in the 17th and 18th centuries. We will focus not only on the forces that contributed to the broad reach of the Baroque—such as trade, exploration, colonization, missionary work, and artistic exchange—but also on the persistence of local artistic styles in the context of the Baroque. 3 hrs. sem. ART CMP EUR HIS

Fall 2014

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HARC 0311 - Artists/Patrons 17th c. Europe      

Artists & their Patrons in the Seventeenth-Century Europe
In this course we will explore the nature of artistic patronage in 17th century Europe. Not only will we examine artists who negotiated the complexities of early modern patronage with great success, such as Bernini, Velazquez, Van Dyck, and Rubens, but we will also consider artists whose efforts met with failure, such as Caravaggio, whose Death of the Virgin was famously rejected. Other topics will include the role of gender and patronage, the circumvention of traditional forms of patronage, and artistic patronage and the state. 3 hrs. sem. ART EUR HIS

Spring 2015

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HARC 0312 - Institutional Critique      

Museums, Managers of Consciousness? Institutional Critique and The Politics of Display
Since the 1960s many artists have focused their practices on exploring the apparent neutrality of cultural institutions, drawing attention to the economical, political, and social biases elided in the seemingly disinterested construction of artistic displays and museum collections. We will begin with a consideration of the initial practitioners of this tendency, known as Institutional Critique, and then also investigate feminist, postmodernist, and other more contemporary practices in this mode. Artists to be discussed will include Daniel Buren, Michael Asher, Hans Haacke, Martha Rosler, Louise Lawler, Fred Wilson, and Andrea Fraser. Readings will be drawn from artists' writings and primary documents, art history, philosophy, anthropology, and sociology. Students will write short papers in direct engagement with assigned readings and complete a research-based project that may take visual form. ART HIS NOR

Winter 2015

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HARC 0313 - Arts of Spain/Spanish Americas      

From Velázquez to Cabrera: The Arts of Spain and the Spanish Americas
In this course we will examine the art and visual culture of Spain and the Spanish Americas from the early sixteenth to the early nineteenth century. We will consider the impact that religion, politics, and patronage had on artists working in Spain and the Viceroyalties of New Spain and Peru, focusing especially on how visual traditions, iconographies, and practices were reshaped when they crossed the Atlantic. We will also consider how—in the wake of global trade and exploration—contact between Amerindian, African, Asian, and European artisans transformed artistic production, patronage, and collecting practices throughout the Iberian world. 3 hrs. sem. ART CMP HIS

Spring 2016, Spring 2017

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HARC 0318 - Mughal Art      

Imperial Splendor: the Art and Architecture of India's Mughal Empire
The Mughal empire, founded by a new dynasty of Muslim rulers, claimed control over much of north India in the 16th century. Under their dominance, new forms of art and architecture flourished. In this seminar we will critically explore such topics as: the style and symbolism of Mughal art and architecture; the influence of Persian and Indian Rajput visual forms; the biographies and ambitions of the Mughal rulers; the role of women in the Mughal court; and the interactions between Muslim and Hindu visual cultures, as well as the important contributions made by European art. We will pay special attention to how art and architecture played a central role in imperial self-definition and the construction of a specialized Mughal history, placing those works in their political, social, and cultural contexts. 3 hrs. lect. AAL ART HIS

Spring 2015

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HARC 0321 - Tibetan Buddhist Art      

The Art of Tibetan Buddhism
In this course we will explore the fascinating imagery of Tibetan Buddhist art, with special attention paid to the rich visual language of tangkas—devotional paintings on cloth of Buddhas, Buddhist deities, spiritual teachers (lamas), and cosmic diagrams (mandalas)— which were used as aids for visualization and meditation. Topics will include the history of Tibet, the growth of Tibetan Buddhist sects, and the development of distinctive stylistic and iconographic characteristics as seen in tangkas, religious sculpture, ritual implements, and monastic architecture. This course will be offered in conjunction with a visiting exhibition of Tibetan tangkas at the Middlebury College Art Museum. 3 hrs. sem./3 hrs. screening. AAL ART HIS

Fall 2014

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HARC 0324 - AmCiv War: Art&Visual Culture      

The American Civil War in Art and Visual Culture, Present
We will examine the art, artifacts, and material culture of the “War Between the States,” from flag and uniform design, periodical illustrations, and photography, to Sanitary Fairs, fundraisers, and keepsakes. History and genre paintings by Winslow Homer and Lilly Martin Spencer will illuminate both battlefield and homefront. We will also explore the legacy of the Civil War, analyzing monuments and memorials, anniversary commemorations (especially the 1960s Centennial and the Civil Rights Movement), reenactments, and contemporary artists’ engagement with the War’s visual imagery (Kara Walker, Glenn Ligon, Matthew Day Jackson). Several sessions will meet at the Middlebury College Museum of Art. 3 hrs. lect. ART HIS NOR

Spring 2015, Spring 2016

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HARC 0327 - Photography & the Environment      

Photography and the Environment
Since the invention of photography in 1839, photographers have turned their gaze toward the world around them. Working on the land, they have considered issues of land management and natural resources in a variety of ways. In this course we will explore the question of how American photographers from the 19th century to the present have used their photographs as a way of raising awareness about a variety of environmental questions. Artists to be considered may include: Timothy O'Sullivan, William Henry Jackson, Carleton Watkins, Annie Brigman, Ansel Adams, Laura Gilpin, Richard Misrach, and Edward Burtynsky. 3 hrs. lect/disc. ART HIS NOR

Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015, Spring 2016

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HARC 0328 - Global Influence/European Art      

Early Modern Europe's Global Artistic Interactions
In this course we will examine Early Modern European art through a global perspective. We will investigate the artistic exchanges between Northern, Southern, and Eastern Europe as well as Europe's increasing interaction with the rest of the world during the Age of Exploration. By examining primary sources such as travel accounts, we will also explore the Europeans perception of the so-called Others, including Africans, Muslims, Indians, and Asians, was manifested in the visual arts. We will also examine the artistic repercussions between Europe and beyond as consequences of trade and missionary activities. (Not open to students who have taken HARC 1015) 3 hrs. lect/disc. ART EUR HIS

Fall 2012

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HARC 0329 - Nationalism and Identity      

Nationalism and Identity in Central and Eastern European Art and Architecture
In this discussion based class our studies will take us from Berlin to Krakow, Budapest to Zakopane, exploring the history of Central and Eastern Europe from 1870 to 1945 through an examination of art and architecture. We will study how the rapid pace of industrialization and urbanization, burgeoning commodity culture, ethnic unrest, and nationalist movements destabilized Central and Eastern European society, resulting in new forms of art and architecture. We will take advantage of the opportunities offered by the exhibition, “Bloom and Doom: Visual Expression and Reform in Vienna 1900” (at our Middlebury College Museum of Art) to inform our discussion. ART EUR HIS

Fall 2016

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HARC 0330 - Interm. Architectural Design      

Intermediate Architectural Design
This studio course emphasizes the thought and method of architectural design. Members of this studio will be involved in developing their insights towards cultural value systems and their expression in the environments they create. Participants work primarily in the studio space and rely heavily on individual instruction and group review of their work. The course provides a foundation for more advanced study in the areas of architecture, landscape architecture, and other fields related to the design of the built environment, and an opportunity to work with the Cameron Visiting Architect. (HARC 0130) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab ART

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Spring 2016, Fall 2016

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HARC 0331 - Architectural Utopias      

The Utopian Impulse in Architecture
In this seminar we will explore the impulse to create the world anew through urban planning and architecture. From St. Augustine to the New Urbanism, the imagining and building of utopian communities has played a central role in architectural thought. We will see that while some utopias were built (and generally failed), many were never meant to serve as real prescriptions for human progress, but instead functioned as critical devices that challenged the status quo (while remaining impossible dreams of a more perfect world). By the conclusion of this course you will see architectural utopias as nuanced and complex constructions, and will be able to confidently read, describe and analyze scholarly secondary and primary texts in the field of architectural history, as well as buildings and urban spaces. 3 hrs. sem. ART EUR HIS

Spring 2013, Spring 2017

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HARC 0332 - Buildings in Context      

Buildings in Context
In this course we will focus on the various methods and theories that enrich and deepen our understanding of architecture and the built environment. This seminar will help students hone their analytical skills, both verbal and written, and provide them with the tools to probe the relationship of the built environment to professional practices and larger cultural forces. In general, students will gain an awareness of objects of culture broadly construed, and will sharpen their understanding of the scope and intellectual history of architecture. It is strongly encouraged that students majoring in Architectural Studies take this course in their second or third year. 3 hrs. sem. ART CW HIS

Fall 2013, Winter 2014

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HARC 0338 - Gender and the Making of Space      

Gender and the Making of Space
In this course we will investigate the complex relationship between gender and architecture, examining how the design of the built environment (buildings, urban spaces, etc.) can reinforce or undermine ideas about the respective roles of women and men in society, from the creation of masculine and feminine spaces to the gendered nature of the architectural profession. By looking at both visual evidence and textual sources we will also uncover how the social construction of gender roles and gendered spaces are, and continue to be, inflected by race, class, and sexuality. Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1407. 3 hrs. sem. ART CMP HIS

Fall 2014

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HARC 0339 - Home: The Way We Live      

Home: The Why Behind the Way We Live
In this course we will examine the development of numerous housing types in America (with references to Europe). The prevalence of the single-family home today and its importance as the symbol of the “American dream” was never a forgone conclusion. In fact, the American home has been the focus of and battleground for cooperative movements, feminism, municipal socialism, benevolent capitalism, and government interventions on a national scale. 3 hrs. sem. ART HIS NOR

Fall 2012, Spring 2015, Spring 2017

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HARC 0341 - Faust's Metropolis: Berlin      

Faust’s Metropolis: History, Architecture, and Urbanism in Berlin (in English)
In this course we will investigate the rich and complicated built environment of Berlin. By looking at both visual evidence and textual sources we will uncover how the city has been transformed from a cultural backwater during the early modern period to the current capital of a reunified Germany. By the conclusion of this course, you will be comfortable “reading” buildings and spaces and will be able to navigate both the physical city of Berlin and the many layers of history buried within. 3 hrs. sem. ART EUR HIS

Fall 2014

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HARC 0342 - Visual Culture: Vienna 1900      

Bloom and Doom: Visual Expressions and Reform in Vienna 1900
In this course we will examine the visual culture of turn of the century Vienna, then the artistic and political capital of a multi-national empire. With the help of primary and secondary source readings, we will consider how artists, architects, and designers sought to come to terms with their shifting world. Part of our inquiry will involve the planning of an exhibition of original artworks from the holdings of the Sabarsky Foundation in New York City, including works by Gustav Klimt and Egon Schiele, at the Middlebury College Museum in the fall semester of 2016. 3 hrs. sem. ART EUR HIS

Spring 2016

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HARC 0343 - Storytelling in Asian Art      

Mural to Manga: Storytelling in Asian Art
Epic Asian tales such as India’s Bhagavad-Gita, Iran’s Shahnameh/, and China’s Journey to the West/ have inspired artists for centuries and continue to capture the imaginations of comic book artists today. In this seminar we will delve into the Asian classics and their many painted, sculpted, and printed interpretations in order to understand why artists depicted these compelling narratives in such drastically different ways. For the final project students will create their own one-shot comic based on an Asian short story or folktale. This course is not open to students who have taken FYSE 1421. 3 hrs. sem. AAL ART CMP

Fall 2015

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HARC 0344 - Body in German & Austrian Art      

Naked Truth: Approaches to the Body in Early 20th Century German-Austrian Art (in English)
In this team-taught course we will examine conceptions of the human body and the manner of its visualization in Germany and Austria in the period leading up to and following the First World War. Part of our inquiry will involve the planning of an exhibition of original artworks from the holdings of the Sabarsky Foundation (New York City), provisionally entitled Naked Truth, at the Middlebury College Museum in the fall semester of 2015. With the help of primary source readings from the period, and secondary readings in philosophy, critical and literary theory, and art history, we will consider how German and Austrian artists turned to the nude body as the site through which questions of personal and political freedom, desire, beauty, nature, culture, and their antonyms could be negotiated and represented. Taking these ideas as one critical point of departure, the class will work with select drawings, paintings, and etchings by Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, Otto Dix, and Käthe Kollwitz, among others. 3 hrs. sem. ART EUR PHL

Spring 2015

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HARC 0345 - Four American Artists      

Four American Artists
In this course we will examine the art and lives of four masters of American modernism: Ansel Adams, Georgia O'Keeffe, Man Ray, and Joseph Cornell. While Adams and O'Keeffe projected nationalist and environmental themes in their work, Man Ray and Cornell offered a European-based Surrealist approach. Through examining these artists and the interconnections between them, we will consider photography, painting, sculpture, and film in the context of American modernist art. We will consider the following questions: What makes art modern? What is the role of national identity? How do artists work in a variety of media? What makes these artists important? ART HIS NOR

Winter 2014

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HARC 0347 - Aesthetics of Asian Art      

The Aesthetics of Asian Art: Is Beauty in the Eye of the Beholder?
In this course we will consider select Asian (Indian, Chinese, Japanese) and Islamic artworks in the Middlebury College Museum of Art’s permanent collection to explore the fundamental question: “Is beauty in the eye of the beholder?” Are standards in beauty universal, or are they always relative? We will ask how the act of beholding is entwined with cultural assumptions and conditioning and will address those assumptions through an intensive combination of close looking, critical analysis, and comparative consideration of a diverse range of artworks and aesthetic traditions. Comparisons will be made with select works of Western art in the museum. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL ART CMP

Spring 2016

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HARC 0348 - American Portraiture      

American Faces: A Cultural History of Portraiture and Identity
Portraits in their many forms have been part of American society since the 17th century. Why has the portrait been such a resilient form of expression? What is the relationship between portraiture and identity? What role has photography played in the evolution of portraiture in American life? This course, which complements an exhibit on view at the college museum, will explore portraits over the past 200 years--from public portraits and memorials to biography, caricature, and photographic snapshots. Students will create their own 21st century portrait and consider what forms future portraits may take. 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART NOR

Spring 2017

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HARC 0360 - Topics in Contemporary Art      

Art’s Worlds: Topics in Contemporary Art
The word contemporary is relational; to be con-temporary means to exist with others in time. In this seminar we will explore themes in very recent art, paying particular attention to how various practices draw attention to the constitutive relation of “with” through form. Topics may include artistic responses to social conflict, technological change, expanding global art centers, among others. Specific topics will vary, in part, based on student interests and current debates. Readings will be drawn from critical texts, recent scholarship and artists’ writings. Prior exposure to post-1945 art is helpful, but not required. 3 hrs. sem. ART

Spring 2017

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HARC 0361 - Minimalism      

Minimalism: Art, Objects, and Experience
In Artforum in 1966, the sculptor Robert Morris defended his plain, geometric objects, arguing: “Simplicity of shape does not necessarily equate with simplicity of experience.” Such a position has come to define minimalism, one of the most important artistic practices of the postwar era in North America. In this seminar we will explore the development of minimal art across a variety of media, including painting, sculpture, film, and music. We will focus on the practices of individual artists (Donald Judd, Carl Andre, Dan Flavin) as well as broader theoretical arguments. Students will situate figures and debates historically and also explore their contemporary influence. 3 hrs. sem. ART HIS NOR

Spring 2013, Spring 2016

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HARC 0370 - How Asian Art is Made      

Potter, Painter, and Goldsmith: How Asian Art is Made
In this seminar we will explore the manner in which the distinctive artistic traditions of China, Korea, and Japan were shaped by the materials and techniques available to ancient craftsmen. Some of these technologies remained localized, while others—like porcelain and silk—went on to transform world history by fueling major export markets. Through observation of objects from the Middlebury Museum of Art, we will explore such questions as: How was Asian art made; Why was it made that way? What was its historical impact? Topics will include jade and other hardstones, bronze, textiles, ceramics, painting, lacquer, glass, and gold. AAL ART CW HIS

Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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HARC 0402 - Adv Research in Museum Studies      

Advanced Research in Museum Studies
Under the guidance of the curator of Asian art, students will research in depth an Asian artwork or group of artworks in the collection of the Middlebury College Museum of Art in preparation for the publication of a Handbook of the Collection. This course emphasizes independent research and scholarly writing; each student will build a bibliography, read extensively on the period and culture, write and revise a paper on the artwork(s), and craft one entry or more for the Handbook. Meetings will entail extensive research in the library and occasionally in the museum. Preference will be given to students who have taken HARC 0102 or other courses in Asian art and who have reading ability in languages appropriate to their topics. (Approval required). 3 hrs. sem. AAL ART

Spring 2017

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HARC 0510 - Advanced Studies      

Advanced Studies
Supervised independent work in art history, museum studies, or architectural studies. (Approval Required)

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017

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HARC 0530 - Independent Architect. Design      

Supervised independent work in architectural analysis and design. (Approval Required)

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017

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HARC 0540 - Independent Museum Studies      

Supervised Independent Work in Museum Studies
This practicum builds upon the Museum Assistants Program (MAP), the hands-on museum education program at the Middlebury College Museum of Art. In MAP, the Curator of Education trains students to conduct tours of the Museum’s permanent collection and of special exhibitions for audiences of peers, school groups, and the general public. Combining service learning with the opportunity to both support and learn more about the arts, students gain expertise in public speaking, art history, and public programming. HARC 0540 should be taken concurrently with the second semester of MAP. The class will culminate with a public presentation on a museum-related topic evaluated by a faculty member of the Department of History of Art & Architecture. (Approval required)

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017

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HARC 0700 - Methods & Theories in Art Hist      

Methods and Theories in the History of Art
This seminar is designed for art history majors and is required of them. We will endeavor to reach a critical understanding of the range of methodologies employed in art historical research and writing, thereby preparing students to undertake their senior thesis work. 3 hrs. sem.

Fall 2012

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HARC 0710 - Senior Thesis Research Seminar      

Senior Thesis Research Seminar
In this course students will conceive, undertake research, and plan the organization of their senior thesis in art history or senior museum studies projects. Seminar discussions and workshops will focus on research strategies, conventions in art historical writing, project design, and public presentation skills. (HARC 0301; Approval Required) 3 hr. sem.

Winter 2013, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015, Fall 2016

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HARC 0711 - SNR Thesis: Research/Writing      

Senior Thesis: Research and Writing
This course is a continuation of HARC 0710 which consists of ongoing, supervised independent research, plus organizing, writing and presenting a senior thesis. (HARC 0301 and HARC 0710).

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Winter 2015, Winter 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017

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HARC 0730 - Methods & Theories/Arch Design      

Methods & Theories in Architectural Design
Architectural design might be described as a critical and creative form of problem solving. In this course, students will examine the various ways in which architects have conceptualized and responded to fundamental architectural problems involving form, technology, and society. Students will be encouraged to think critically about the kinds of problems that design can address; compare various methodological and theoretical approaches; and identify the issues, methods, and theories that interest them the most in their own work. This course is required of seniors in the Architectural Studies track and designed to prepare them for the senior design project. (HARC 0130 and HARC 0330, or an approved substitute course in studio design for the latter) Note: Students may be enrolled in HARC 0330 and HARC 0730 concurrently.

Fall 2012

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HARC 0731 - Arch Studies Research Thesis      

Thesis in Architectural Studies: Research
This studio course constitutes the first part of the two-term senior design project in Architectural Studies. Pre-design research includes precedent study, programming, site analysis, and formulation of a thesis to be investigated through the design process. Preliminary design work begins with conceptual studies, and culminates in a coherent schematic design, to be developed further in Senior Architectural Design, Part II. Students present their work in graphic, oral, and written formats. (HARC 0330 or equivalent) 6 hrs. sem.

Winter 2013, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015, Fall 2016

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HARC 0732 - Senior Architectural Design II      

Thesis in Architectural Studies: Design
This studio course constitutes the second part of the two-term senior design project in Architectural Studies. Building upon the architectural research, analysis, and preliminary design work conducted during the fall semester, students develop their thesis projects to a higher level of understanding and refinement. Students also engage in intense peer review and work with visiting design critics, concluding with public presentations of the final projects, and a project portfolio describing all aspects of the completed design. (HARC 0731) 6 hrs. sem.

Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015, Spring 2016, Spring 2017

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HARC 0761 - Senior Thesis: Museum Studies      

Senior Thesis: Museum Studies
This course is a continuation of HARC 0710, which consists of ongoing, supervised independent work with an advisor, plus organizing, writing, and presenting a curatorial or museum-based thesis or exhibition. (Approval Required)

Spring 2014, Winter 2015, Winter 2016, Winter 2017

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HARC 1009 - Bollywood and Beyond      

Bollywood and Beyond: Topics and Themes in Indian Cinema
Bollywood, the term given to the Indian film industry juggernaut in Bombay, India, has gained an avid following of millions of viewers world-wide. In this course we will provide a critical consideration of the history and development of the popular Indian film industry. We will focus on such topics as the ideas and ideals of Indian art and visuality, notions of gender, idealized beauty, caste, class, religion, social norms, globalism, modernity, nationalism, and fundamentalism. Films are subtitled and no knowledge of another language is expected. Lectures, discussion, and readings will accompany screenings. AAL ART WTR

Winter 2015

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HARC 1010 - Museum Studies: Exhibit Design      

Museum Studies: Exhibit Design
In this course we will explore the many aspects of the exhibit design process in a museum setting–from object care and interpretation through space analysis, display furniture design, graphics, and lighting. Utilizing digital images, readings, and discussions, the class will explore the history of exhibit design from Victorian curiosity rooms to current trends in interactive exhibits and designing for the disabled. Through hands-on exercises, model making, and electronic CAD and graphics programs, students will experiment with exhibit lighting, gallery layouts, and graphic design. Students will keep a daily design journal and as a final project, each student will present a formal design proposal of a particular museum installation. This course will count as an elective towards the History of Art Major. ART WTR

Winter 2013, Winter 2016, Winter 2017

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HARC 1013 - Writing About Florence      

Writing About Florence
This course will offer a close examination of the great building projects of Medieval and Renaissance Florence -- from the Baptistery and Cathedral to the Uffizi, Laurentian Library, and Pitti Palace – with focus on their historic context, patrons (including the Medici and Rucellai), artists (including Brunelleschi, Alberti, and Michelangelo), history, and significance. Through papers, we will explore the outlooks, forces, and people who gave shape to this influential city. ART EUR HIS WTR

Winter 2015

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HARC 1014 - Bauhaus Vorkurs      

Experiencing the Bauhaus /Vorkurs/
The Bauhaus, in the words of its originator, was an ‘idea’. This idea—a state run experiment in arts education during the Weimar Republic—remains one of the most powerful underlying generators for modern design from buildings to furniture available at IKEA. Fundamental design principles were introduced through an intensive course, the Vorkurs, taught by luminaries Itten, Kandinsky and Albers. In this course we will experience a condensed Vorkurs. Content will include historical background for design principles which will be explored through hands-on design workshops. No prior artistic proclivities needed, just a desire to experience expressing one’s inner self through form. This course counts as a HARC elective. ART HIS WTR

Winter 2013, Winter 2014

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HARC 1015 - Early Modern European Art      

“Beyond Europe” in Early Modern European Art*
An elephant from India for the pope, turbaned Muslim merchants in Venice, a samurai ambassador to European courts, and appalling cannibalism in the New World—the visual arts of Europe from the fifteenth to seventeenth century reflected Europeans’ increasing encroachment on, and interaction with, the world beyond. By considering works by artists such as Bellini, Dürer, Raphael, Bernini, and Rubens, we will examine how Europeans depicted peoples and animals from Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and the Americas in the early modern period. We will also examine the artistic exchanges between Europe and beyond as consequences of trade and missionary activities. ART EUR HIS WTR

Winter 2013

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HARC 1016 - Art, Performance, & Activism      

Art in Action: Performance Art in Context
In this course we will survey the history of performance art with particular emphasis on the activities of the Guerrilla Girls and a number of street artists whose works express a political point of view. Based on our study we will organize an exhibition of posters by the Guerrilla Girls for installation in the Museum in the spring of 2014. ART WTR

Winter 2014

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HARC 1017 - Design Activism      

Design Studio: Can Design Activism Change Life?
Over the past twenty years design activism has been subject of increasing attention. It emphasizes participation, dialogue, and community engagement. In this studio we will generate ideas, and communicate those ideas visually, orally, and through writing. By way of readings and documentary films, we will explore design approaches from renowned socially engaged designers and collectives. Students will participate in workshops, conduct individual projects, work in teams, and make presentations on implementing their designs. We will discuss and develop projects that explore the effect of design activism on everyday life, the public sphere, and the built environment. ART WTR

Winter 2015

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HARC 1019 - Van Eyck to Bosch in Museums      

Van Eyck to Bosch and Beyond: Early Netherlandish Painting and the Museum
An artistic revolution occurred in Northern Europe in the Early Modern Period (c. 1400-1550). In this course we will look at the innovations generated by such artists as Robert Campin, Jan Van Eyck, Rogier van der Weyden, Hugo van der Goes, Hans Memling, Gerard David, and Hieronymous Bosch. We will also explore the impact of the North on the Italian Renaissance, and the early history of collecting. The rediscovery of Early Netherlandish painting is linked to its presentation in museums around 1800. We will examine the interaction between these paintings’ presentation in museums and the reception and scholarship they generated. This course will count as an elective towards the History of Art Major. ART EUR WTR

Winter 2016, Winter 2017

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HARC 1020 - African Art in the Museum      

African Art in the Museum
In this course we will survey the arts of Africa through a close examination of the Middlebury College Museum of Art collection. We will learn how cultures from across the continent—Dogon, Yoruba, Benin, Ndebele, and others—use art objects to address questions such as: What makes a ruler? How do we solve problems? What does it mean to be in a community? Who is our neighbor? Our time will be divided into lecture, discussion, and museum research. Students will investigate the objects in the museum’s collection, the cultures they represent, and issues that surround African art in the museum. This course will count as an elective towards the History of Art Major. AAL ART WTR

Winter 2016, Winter 2017

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HARC 1021 - Landscape: Photography & Geog.      

Landscape: Photography and Geography
In this course we will examine the influence of concepts closely associated with geography—space, place, and landscape—on landscape photography. We will explore how these concepts are used in photography to analyze changes in the environment, such as the impact of climate change. Students will read and discuss geographical theory, examine and critique the work of landscape photographers, produce their own photos, write analytical papers, and view and critique films. The class will include a weekly lab and culminate in a public exhibition of student photos at a local venue. Each student will be required to contribute $50 towards the cost of materials. ART WTR

Winter 2016, Winter 2017

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Department of History of Art & Architecture

Kirsten Hoving, Chair
Michaela Davico, Department Coordinator

Mahaney Center for the Arts
72 Porter Field Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753