Middlebury

 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

HIST 0103 - The Making Of Europe      

The Making of Europe
This course covers the history of Western Europe from the death of Caesar in 44 B.C. to the Peace of Westphalia in A.D. 1648. We will examine three interrelated themes: political authority within European society, the development of the religious culture of the West and the challenges to that culture, and the ways in which the development of a European economy contributed to the making of Europe itself. While examining these questions from the Roman Empire to early modern Europe, students will focus on the use of original sources, and on how historians interpret the past. Pre-1800. Not open to seniors. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

EUR HIS SOC

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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HIST 0105 - The Atlantic World, 1492-1900      

The Atlantic World, 1492-1900
Linking the Americas with Europe and Africa, the Atlantic has been a major conduit for the movement of peoples, goods, diseases, and cultures. This course will explore specific examples of transatlantic interchange, from imperialism and slave trade to religious movements, consumerism, and the rise of national consciousness. It will adopt a broad comparative perspective, ranging across regional, national ,and ethnic boundaries. We will consider the varied experiences of Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans as they struggled to establish their own identities within a rapidly changing Atlantic world. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

CMP HIS SOC

Fall 2010, Spring 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2015

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HIST 0106 - Colonial Latin America      

Colonial Latin America
In this course we will examine the formation of Latin American societies from 1492 to 1800, with emphasis on the contact of indigenous, European, and African civilizations; the conditions that facilitated European conquest; life in the colonial societies; and the political, economic, and philosophical changes that led to the independence movements of the 19th century. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. (formerly HIST 0285)

AAL HIS SOC

Fall 2011, Fall 2013

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HIST 0107 - Modern Latin America      

Modern Latin America
This survey course will trace the philosophical, economic, political, and cultural developments of Latin America from independence to the present day. Particular emphasis will be placed on the formation of nation-states; issues of development, including agricultural production and industrialization; national and cultural symbols; and social relations within Latin American societies. The aim of the course is to provide a broad background of major themes and issues in Latin American societies which include Mexico, Central America, and South America. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. (formerly HIST 0286)

AAL HIS SOC

Spring 2012, Spring 2014

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HIST 0108 - Early Islam and Middle East      

The Early History of Islam and the Middle East
This course is an introduction to the history of Islamic civilizations from the advent of Islam around 610 C.E. to the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople in 1453. The principal geographic areas covered are the Middle East and North Africa. Since "Islam" encompasses not simply a religion but an entire cultural complex, this course will trace the development of religious, political, economic, and social institutions in this region. Topics covered include the early Islamic conquests, the rise of religious sectarianism, gender relations, and the expansion of Islamic empires. Pre-1800. 3 hrs lect./disc.

AAL HIS SOC

Spring 2011, Fall 2012

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HIST 0109 - Islam & Mid. East Since 1453      

History of Islam and the Middle East, Since 1453
This course is an introduction to the major institutions that evolved under the aegis of what we might call Islamic civilization since the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople in 1453. The principal geographic areas covered are the Middle East and North Africa. Major topics include the rise of the Ottoman and Safavid Empires, Western intervention and colonialism, nationalism and state formation, and the challenges of and responses to modernization. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

AAL HIS

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2013

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HIST 0110 - Modern South Asia      

Modern South Asia
This course is an introduction to the history of South Asia. We will examine such events as the remarkable rise and fall of the Mughal empire (1526-1700s), the transformation of the once-humble English East India Company into a formidable colonial state (1700s-1858), the emergence of nationalist and anti-imperialist movements led by people such as Mahatma Gandhi and M.A. Jinnah (1858-1947), and the establishment and recent histories of the new nations of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka. Readings will include primary sources, history textbooks, historical novels, and newspaper articles. We will also watch at least one historical film. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL HIS

Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2013, Spring 2014

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HIST 0111 - Early East Asia      

Early East Asia
This course explores the history of China, Korea, and Japan in the centuries before extended contact with the West. We will begin by questioning what historians mean by “East Asia” as a historical category and then trace the shared as well as distinct philosophical, political, and cultural practices that defined each region and its respective historical periods. Topics will include Confucianism, Buddhism, the development of local and regional economies, the migration of populations, and the changing modes of statecraft within each area. Pre-1800. Not open to students who have taken HIST 0231 or HIST 0235. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

AAL CMP HIS SOC

Fall 2010, Fall 2011

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HIST 0112 - Modern East Asia      

Modern East Asia
In this course we will examine East Asian history from 1800 to the present. We will study the “Chinese World Order,” the patterns of European imperialism that led to this order’s demise, the rise of Japan as an imperialist power, and 20th century wars and revolutions. We will concentrate on the emergence of Japan, China, and Korea as distinct national entities and on the socio-historical forces that have bound them together and pried them apart. We will seek a broader understanding of imperialism, patterns of nationalism and revolution, and Cold War configurations of power in East Asia. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

AAL CMP HIS SOC

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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HIST 0113 - History of Africa to 1800      

History of Africa To 1800
This course offers an introductory survey of African history from earliest times to 1800. Through lectures, discussions, readings, and films, we will explore Africa’s complex and diverse pre-colonial past. Themes examined in the course include development of long-distance trade networks, the linkages between ecological change and social dynamics, the formation of large pre-colonial states, and the transatlantic slave trade and its impact on social and economic relations within Africa. A broader concern in the course is how we have come to understand the meaning of “Africa” itself and what is at stake in interpreting Africa’s pre-colonial history. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

AAL HIS SOC

Fall 2012, Spring 2014

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HIST 0114 - History of Modern Africa      

History of Modern Africa
We begin looking at revolutions in the early 19th century and the transformations surrounding the slave trade. Next we examine the European colonization of the continent, exploring how diverse interventions into Africans' lives had complex effects on political authority, class and generational dynamics, gender relations, ethnic and cultural identities, and rural and urban livelihoods. After exploring Africans' struggles against colonial rule in day-to-day practices and mass political movements, the last few weeks cover Africa's transition to independence and the postcolonial era, including the experience of neo-colonialism, ethnic conflict, poverty, and demographic crisis. (formerly HIST 0226) 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

AAL HIS SOC

Fall 2011, Spring 2013, Fall 2014

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HIST 0131 - Archaic and Classical Greece      

Archaic and Classical Greece
A survey of Greek history from Homer to the Hellenistic period, based primarily on a close reading of ancient sources in translation. The course covers the emergence of the polis in the Dark Age, colonization and tyranny, the birth of democracy, the Persian Wars, the interdependence of democracy and Athenian imperialism, the Peloponnesian War, and the rise of Macedon. Authors read include Herodotus, Thucydides, Aristophanes, Plutarch, Xenophon, and the Greek orators. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

EUR HIS LIT

Fall 2012

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HIST 0132 - History Of Rome      

History of Rome
This course will study Roman history from its origins to Constantine. Particular emphasis will be on the unique characteristics of Roman society, the rise and influence of imperialism, the transition from Republic to Empire, the role of Rome as a Mediterranean power, and the emergence of Christianity. Readings will focus on the ancient sources, all in translation; authors include Polybius, Plutarch, Tacitus, and Eusebius. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

EUR HIS LIT

Fall 2011, Fall 2013

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HIST 0170 - Religion in America      

Religion in America
America often has been defined paradoxically as both the "most religious" and "least religious" of nations. This course, a historical survey of American religious life, will trace the unique story of American religion from colonial times to the present. Guiding our exploration will be the ideas of "contact," "conflict," and "combination." Along the way, we will examine the varieties of religious experiences and traditions that have shaped and been shaped by American culture such as, Native American traditions, Puritan life and thought, evangelicalism, immigration, African-American religious experience, women's movements, and the on-going challenges of religious diversity. Readings include sermons, essays, diaries and fiction, as well as secondary source material. 2 hrs. lect. 1 hr. disc.

HIS NOR PHL

Fall 2010, Fall 2014

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HIST 0175 - Immigrant America      

Immigrant America
In this course we will trace American immigration history from the late 19th to the turn of the 21st century, and examine the essential place immigration has occupied in the making of modern America and American culture. The central themes of this course will be industrialization and labor migrations, aftermaths of wars and refugees, constructions of racial categories and ethnic community identities, legal defining of "aliens" and citizenship, and diversity in immigrant experiences. To explore these themes, we will engage a range of sources including memoirs, novels, oral histories, and films.

HIS NOR

Fall 2013

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HIST 0202 - The American Mind      

The American Mind
We will consider the history of influential American ideas, and ideas about America, from the Revolution to the present, with particular regard to changing cultural contexts. A continuing question will be whether such a consensus concept as “the American Mind” has the validity long claimed for it. Among many writers we will read are Thomas Jefferson, Alexis de Tocqueville, William James, Martin Luther King, Reinhold Niebuhr and Betty Friedan. (Previously taught as HIST/AMST 0426)

HIS NOR

Fall 2010, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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HIST 0203 - US History 1492-1861      

United States History: 1492-1861
A survey of American political, social and intellectual developments from the colonial period to the Civil War. Students receiving AP credit in American history may not take HIST 0203 for credit. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIS NOR SOC

Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2014

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HIST 0204 - US History 1861-2011      

United States History, 1861–2011
In this course we will explore the last 150 years of American history, examining the major issues that Americans faced economically, socially, politically, and culturally. Though course content will focus primarily on the nation's domestic developments, we will also consider the role the United States played in significant world events during the last century. We will make a special effort to employ a multicultural approach through readings and films. This survey course is a continuation of HIST 0203, but it is an independent course; there are no prerequisites. Students with AP credit in American history may not take HIST 0204 for credit. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIS NOR SOC

Spring 2013

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HIST 0206 - The United States & the World      

The United States and the World Since 1898
This course serves as an introduction to the history of American foreign relations from the Spanish-American War of 1898 to the turn of the 21st century. Through lectures, discussions, and a variety of readings, we will explore the multi-dimensional nature of the nation's rise to power within the global community, as well as the impact of international affairs upon American society. In addition to formal diplomacy and foreign policy, this course addresses topics such as immigration, cultural exchange, transnationalism, and globalization. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIS NOR

Fall 2010, Spring 2012, Spring 2015

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HIST 0207 - The Southwest Borderlands      

The Southwest Borderlands: Cultural Encounters in a Changing Environment
In the wake of the US-Mexican War in 1848, Anglo-settlers, Native Americans, and Mexicans struggled over competing visions of an American future that would take root in the Southwest Borderlands. In this course we will examine how cross-cultural encounters shaped policy, changed the landscape, and heightened racial tensions. Using a variety of texts—documentary and feature films, magazines and newspapers, travelers' accounts and popular literature—we will explore a wide range of topics: territorial expansion, Native dispossession, racial formation and anxiety, the creation of the sunbelt, Mexican migration and labor, and the rise of the information economy. Drawing on these items, we will ultimately reflect on how past and present collide on the American borderlands, shaping the United States in countless ways. 3 hrs. lect

HIS NOR

Spring 2014, Fall 2014

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HIST 0211 - Modern Brazil      

Modern Brazil
In this course we will study the history of modern Brazil from independence to the present day. We will pay close attention to the construction of national institutions and culture in the 19th and 20th centuries. We will examine the major political, economic, and cultural movements that defined Brazilian history during the empire and abolition as well as the Vargas and military dictatorships of the 20th century, and the representative democracy from the 1980s to the present. Finally, we will compare the major developments in Brazil to that of its neighbors, particularly Argentina, Paraguay, and Uruguay.

AAL HIS

Fall 2010

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HIST 0212 - Civil War and Reconstruction      

Civil War and Reconstruction: 1845-1890
This course explores the era of the American Civil War with an emphasis on the period 1861-1865. It combines lectures, readings, class discussion, and film to address such questions as why the war came, why the Confederacy lost, and how the war affected various elements of society. We will also explore what was left unresolved at the end of the war, how Americans responded to Reconstruction, and how subsequent generations have understood the meaning of the conflict and its legacy. We will make a special effort to tie military and political events to life on the home front. (formerly HIST 0364) 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIS NOR

Fall 2012, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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HIST 0215 - America, 1960-2000      

Twentieth-Century America, 1960-2000
This course concentrates on the history of the United States from the emergence of JFK's New Frontier until the eve of September 11, 2001. In particular, we will focus on the ways in which domestic development shaped America's place within the international community, and vice versa. Topics to be considered include: the rise and fall of the post-1945 social welfare state, decolonization and the Vietnam War, increasing American investment in the Middle East, the emergence of the "New Right," the end of the Cold War, and globalization and its contexts. (formerly HIST 0368) 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIS NOR

Fall 2011, Fall 2014

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HIST 0216 - Hist of American West      

History of the American West
This is a survey of the history of the trans-Mississippi West from colonial contact through the 1980s. It explores how that region became known and understood as the West, and its role and meaning in United States history as a whole. The central themes of this course are conquest and its legacy, especially with regard to the role of the U.S. federal government in the West; human interactions with and perceptions of landscape and environment; social contests among different groups for a right to western resources and over the meanings of western identity; and the role of the West in American popular culture. (formerly HIST/AMST 0374) 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIS NOR SOC

Spring 2012, Spring 2013

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HIST 0217 - History of Urban America      

The History of Urban America
"The magnification of all the dimensions of life," writes Lewis Mumford, " . . . has been the supreme office of the city in history." Mumford's appraisal of the mission of the city can be debated, but the importance of the city to civilization cannot be denied. This course traces the rise of the city in America from the colonial era to the present. It explores why Americans have huddled in concentrated settlements and the consequences of that clustering. Special attention will be given to the growth of the industrial city of the late 19th century and the modern metropolis of the 20th century. (formerly HIST/AMST 0375) 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIS NOR

Fall 2011

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HIST 0220 - American Economic History      

American Economic History since 1900
This course will provide an overview of the major themes in the growth and development of the modern American economy. Topics will include the economic history of railroads, automobiles, foreign trade, banks and financial markets. We will also examine the role of the courts and government policy in American economic development, with special emphasis on the rise and decline of Laissez-Faire as the dominant mode of economic regulation in the nation's labor and financial markets. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

HIS NOR SOC

Fall 2011, Fall 2012

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HIST 0222 - Intro To Environmental History      

Introduction to Environmental History
This introduction to the history of human interactions with the physical environment focuses on case studies, including European settlement of the New World, industrialization, fire, warfare, and the modern environmental movement, both in the United States and beyond its borders. In this course we will explore several themes, including the consequences of European expansion for human communities and their environments; shifting understandings of nature; cities and their hinterlands as different ways that humans organize nature; and class and race as factors in the human experience of nature and of environmentalism.

HIS NOR SOC

Fall 2010, Fall 2012, Spring 2015

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HIST 0225 - African American History      

African American History
This course will explore the history of the African American people from the slave trade to the present. It will examine the process of enslavement, the nature of American slavery, the meaning of emancipation, the response to the rise of legalized segregation, and the modern struggle for equality. Special attention will be given to placing the African American story within the context of the developing American nation, its institutions, and its culture. (formerly HIST0371) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIS NOR

Spring 2011, Spring 2013, Spring 2015

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HIST 0228 - Religion in America      

Religion in America
America often has been defined paradoxically as both the "most religious" and "least religious" of nations. This course, a historical survey of American religious life, will trace the unique story of American religion from colonial times to the present. Guiding our exploration will be the ideas of "contact," "conflict," and "combination." Along the way, we will examine the varieties of religious experiences and traditions that have shaped and been shaped by American culture such as, Native American traditions, Puritan life and thought, evangelicalism, immigration, African-American religious experience, women's movements, and the on-going challenges of religious diversity. Readings include sermons, essays, diaries and fiction, as well as secondary source material. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIS NOR PHL

Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013

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HIST 0231 - Imperial China      

Imperial China
China’s is the world’s oldest continuous civilization, and we will survey the history of the Chinese empire from its cultural beginnings until the conflicts with the West in the 1840s and the internal unrest of the 1850s and 1860s. Our study of China’s political progression through successive dynasties will reveal archetypal patterns of historical disruption amidst continuity. We will also examine those perennial social, institutional, and intellectual forces — such as the stratification of the classes, the absolutist tendencies of monarchy, and the civilly-focused yet competitive atmosphere fostered by a state-sponsored examination culture — that proved determinative in shaping China’s traditional development.

AAL HIS SOC

Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2015

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HIST 0232 - Modern China      

Modern China
In this course we will examine the history of China from the early 19th century through the end of the Maoist period. Readings, lectures, and discussions will familiarize students with the cultural and social structures of the late Qing Empire, patterns of semi-colonialism, the rise of nationalist, feminist, and Marxist movements, and key events in the People’s Republic of China. Students will emerge from the class with a broader understanding of forms of empire and imperialism, anti-colonial nationalism, non-Western Marxism, and the tendencies of a post-socialist state. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

AAL HIS SOC

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2014

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HIST 0235 - History of Pre-Modern Japan      

History of Pre-Modern Japan
In this course we will explore the social, cultural, and institutional history of Japan from the eighth century up through the rise of the Tokugawa shogunate in the 17th century. The course is organized thematically to illuminate the different periods of Japanese history, including the imperial origin myth and Heian culture, the frontier and the rise of samurai government, localism and the warring states period, and finally the Tokugawa settlement and the paradoxes of centralized feudalism. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

AAL HIS SOC

Fall 2011, Spring 2013, Fall 2014

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HIST 0236 - History of Modern Japan      

The History of Modern Japan
In this course we will review the major themes and events of modern Japanese history from the Meiji Restoration (1868) to the present. Through reading a variety of primary texts, historical analyses, and literature, as well as watching films, we will explore the formation of the modern Japanese nation-state, Japan’s colonial project in East Asia, 1920s mass culture, the question of Showa fascism, and Japan’s unique postwar experience, from occupation to high-growth and the “lost decade” of the 1990s. We will pay particular attention to the relationship between changes within Japan and larger global trends. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL HIS SOC

Fall 2010, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2015

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HIST 0237 - Chinese Philosophy      

Chinese Philosophy
A survey of the dominant philosophies of China, beginning with the establishment of the earliest intellectual orientations, moving to the emergence of the competing schools of the fifth century B.C., and concluding with the modern adoption and adaptation of Marxist thought. Early native alternatives to Confucian philosophy (such as Mohism, Daoism, and Legalism) and later foreign ones (such as Buddhism and Marxism) will be stressed. We will scrutinize individual thinkers with reference to their philosophical contributions and assess the implications of their ideas with reference to their historical contexts and comparative significance. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL HIS PHL

Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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HIST 0238 - Medieval Cities      

Medieval Cities
This course will examine the economic, social, topographical and cultural history of the medieval city. We will study the transformation of urban life from the Roman period through the dark years of the early Middle Ages in the West into the flourishing of a new type of European city life in the High Middle Ages. The development of urban institutions, the building of cathedrals, universities and fortifications, and the growth of trade will all be considered, as will the experience of groups such as Jews, women and intellectuals. Although the class will focus on the medieval European city, we will also draw comparisons with cities of the Muslim East. Pre-1800. 3 hrs lect/disc.

EUR HIS

Spring 2014

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HIST 0240 - History of Pakistan      

History of Pakistan
This course is a political and cultural history of Pakistan. Topics to be discussed include: the pre-independence demand for Pakistan; the partitioning of India in 1947; literary and cultural traditions; the power of the army in politics; the civil war that created Bangladesh; the wars with India; the wars in Afghanistan; the rise of Islamist parties and militant groups; the significance of the Taliban and al Qaeda; and Pakistan's relations with the US, China and India. Readings will include histories, autobiographies, novels, and newspaper and magazine accounts. Several documentary films will also be shown. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL HIS

Fall 2012, Fall 2013

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HIST 0241 - Europe in Early Middle Ages      

Europe in the Early Middle Ages
This course covers the formative centuries in European history which witnessed the emergence of Western Europe as a distinct civilization. During this period, A. D. 300-1050, the three major building blocks of Western European culture: the classical tradition of Greco-Roman antiquity, the Judeo-Christian tradition, and Germanic tradition, met and fused into an uneasy synthesis that gave Western Europe its cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious foundations. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

EUR HIS SOC

Spring 2011, Spring 2014

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HIST 0242 - Europe in the High Middle Ages      

Europe in the High Middle Ages
This course covers the development and expansion of Western European civilization from approximately 1050 to 1300. This period witnessed the rise of towns, commerce, universities, and cathedrals, as well as important developments in the areas of politics, philosophy, and Western culture. Together, these achievements represent a fundamental shift in Western Europe from an impoverished, besieged society to a dynamic civilization that established the institutions and assumptions on which the modern West is based. The goal of this class is to view these achievements of medieval Europe in their own context, with appreciation of the methodological problems presented by medieval sources. Pre-1800.

EUR HIS SOC

Spring 2015

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HIST 0243 - Mediterranean World, 400-1600      

The Mediterranean World, 400-1600
The Mediterranean has long been a crossroads between East and West and North and South, a meeting point of the Middle East, Northern Africa, and Southern Europe. Merchants and armies have plied the seaways carrying with them their religions and cultures. The pre-modern Mediterranean offered an exhilarating but, at times uncomfortable, mix of Jewish, Christian, and Muslim cultures. Starting from Fernand Braudel's conceit, we will consider the Mediterranean itself as an important character in the narrative of history. We will study the geography of the Mediterranean as well as its religious, economic, environmental, and cultural history with a view to bringing together different understandings of Mare Nostrum (our sea). Pre-1800. 2 hrs lect./1 hr. disc.

CMP HIS

Spring 2012, Spring 2015

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HIST 0244 - Early Modern Europe, 1555-1789      

Society and Culture in Early Modern Europe, 1555-1789
War, famine, and disease marked the terrible "iron century" of European history, from 1550 to 1660. Out of this frightful crucible, modern society was created. We will trace this troubled genesis from the aftershocks of the Reformation to the first rumblings of the French Revolution, stressing the conflicts that gave rise to the modern world: monarchy vs. "liberty," religion vs. "enlightenment," elite vs. popular culture. Topics such as the family, witchcraft, warfare, and fashion will be given special attention. Pre-1800. 3 hr lect/disc.

EUR HIS SOC

Spring 2011

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HIST 0245 - Hist Modern Europe 1800-1900      

History of Modern Europe: 1800-1900
This course will trace several complex threads across the nineteenth century, a period that saw enormous changes in economic structures, political practices, and the experience of daily life. We will look specifically at the construction of nation-states, the industrial revolution and its effects on the lives of the different social classes, the shift from rural to urban life, and the rise of mass culture and its political forms. Taking a cultural perspective, we will consider, for example, the language of working-class politics, the painting of modern urban life, and imperialism in popular culture. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

EUR HIS SOC

Fall 2011, Spring 2014

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HIST 0246 - Modern Europe, 1900-1989      

History of Modern Europe: 1900-1989
Revolution in Eastern Europe and unification in Western Europe have reshaped the contours of the 20th century. This course will move from turn-of-the-century developments in mass culture and politics through World War I and II, the rise and fall of fascism, and on into the postwar era. This century has seen a series of radically new ideas, catastrophes, and then renewed searches for stability. But we will also investigate century-long movements, including de-colonization, the creation of sophisticated consumer cultures, and the battles among ideas of nationalism, ethnicity, and international interdependency. 2 hrs. lect. 1 hr. disc.

EUR HIS SOC

Spring 2011, Fall 2012

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HIST 0247 - Imperial Russia      

Imperial Russia
This course introduces students to the major themes, problems, and events of Russia’s imperial past focusing on the 300-year rule of the Romanov dynasty and extending to the dawn of the revolutionary era. Our major themes will include: the development of Russia’s absolutist state; the processes of secularization, westernization, and industrialization; the interplay between reform, rebellion, and revolution in enacting political change; the growth of Russia’s multi-ethnic, multi-confessional empire; and the role of the radical intelligentsia in Russian thought. We also will give special attention to the vexed question of Russian identity and examine how notions of Russia’s cultural heritage, mission, and position between Europe and Asia, shifted throughout the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries.

AAL HIS SOC

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Spring 2014

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HIST 0248 - History of the Soviet Union      

History of the Soviet Union
In this course we will explore the tumultuous history of Russia's revolutions and the attempts to create a socialist utopia on earth. The course will be organized around three revolutionary moments: the political revolutions of 1905 and 1917, Stalin’s socioeconomic “revolution from above” in the 1930s, and Mikhail Gorbachev’s “accidental revolution” that led to the demise of the USSR in the 1980s. Through secret party documents, novels, diaries, films, and images, students will get a vivid look at everyday life, party dynamics, the shifting status of women, and the centrality of violence in Soviet society.

AAL HIS SOC

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Fall 2013

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HIST 0249 - Germany in the 19th Century      

Germany in the Long Nineteenth Century
This chronologically-organized course will examine Germany's development over the long nineteenth century. Pivotal moments in the formation of Germany will be explored, including but not limited to the following topics: the impact of French revolutionary ideas and the Napoleonic Wars on political organization, the revolutions of 1848-9, the industrial revolution, the wars of unification and 1871, the Kulturkampf, and the efforts at colonization in Africa. Beyond politics and economics, however, this course will also attempt to view the developments in high culture and daily life that were intimately tied up with the larger events. This will include themes like the "Catholic ghetto," urban culture, and Marxist philosophy. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

EUR HIS

Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2015

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HIST 0250 - The Jews in Modern Europe      

The Jews in Modern Europe
In this course we will map the emergence of Jewish minority culture into the modern Western political, economic, and social mainstream. Our course begins with the Jewish Haskalah (with a few short introductions to Jewish medieval and early modern history) and ends with Israel's founding in the early decades of its history. We will trace the following historical trends: the history of Jewish emancipation; assimilation; intellectual movements; Zionism; Jewish marginalization; race and gender as historical categories in Jewish history; urban and diasporic cultures; war and violence; and international politics in post-Holocaust Europe and the world. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMP EUR HIS

Spring 2014

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HIST 0253 - British History: 1603-1815      

British History: 1603-1815
The medieval pattern of English society disintegrated in the seventeenth century. The unity of the English Church, the relationship between Crown and Parliament, even the social hierarchy, were threatened by new developments. After generations of civil war, revolution, and party strife, the eighteenth century saw the establishment of an oligarchic but more flexible order, able to withstand the challenges of radicalism and the American and French revolutions. By 1815 Britain, at the peak of its power in Europe, was already beginning to experience tensions of industrialism. This course will concentrate on the religious, social, and political aspects of these transformations. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

EUR HIS

Spring 2012

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HIST 0256 - Topics in Eur Cult and Hist      

Topics in European Culture and History: Paris-Vienna-Moscow: The Birth of Modernism
The years between 1890 and 1920 represent one of the most creative periods in European history: the incubation of a new artistic culture which we call Modernism. In this course we will explore the cultural ferment in France, Austria and Russia during these crucial decades through the political, artistic, and musical history of the period. Readings will include Dostoevsky, Bely, Huysmans and duGard,. The Russian Realists, Suprematists, and Constructivists, as well as the Impressionists, Post-Impressionists, and Cubists and Viennese Secession will be discussed. The music of Mussorgsky, Rimskii-Korsakov, Stravinsky, Debussy, Satie and Mahler among others will be considered.

ART EUR HIS

Spring 2011

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HIST 0257 - The Holocaust      

The Holocaust
Why did the Holocaust happen? How could the Holocaust happen? In this course we will consider several aspects of the Holocaust, including the long-term conditions and events leading up to it, the measures employed in undertaking it, and the aftermath of the atrocities. Beyond a general survey, this course introduces students to the many varying interpretations and historical arguments scholars of the Holocaust have proposed and invites them to discuss and debate these issues in class. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

EUR HIS

Fall 2010, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2015

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HIST 0262 - History of Modern Middle East      

History of the Modern Middle East
This course investigates the history of social and political change in the Middle East from 1798 to the present. Within a general political framework, the course will cover the main social, economic, and intellectual currents. Emphasizing political, economic, social and cultural history, the course seeks to examine the impact of outside powers on the region, the responses of the region's peoples to this challenge, colonization, nationalism and identity, religious and ideological trends, gender issues, major "crises" (including the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Lebanese civil war, and the Iranian Revolution), and efforts to reassert Islamic identity in an era of globalization. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL HIS SOC

Spring 2011, Fall 2012

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HIST 0266 - Egypt Iran & Turkey: Mdrn Hist      

Egypt, Iran, and Turkey: Alternative Modernizations
The Middle East's struggles with modernization are encapsulated in the history of its three most populous nation-states: Egypt, Iran, and Turkey. The rise of nationalism, European incursions in the Middle East, and internal strife contributed to the gradual fall of the Ottoman and Qajar Empires in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. From the rubble emerged distinct social, political, economic, and religious responses to modernization, ranging from the establishment of a secular, ultra-nationalist state in Turkey, Arab nationalism in Egypt, monarchism and Islamism in Iran. We will explore and compare these three experiences using an array of sources including primary documents, works of fiction, and film. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL CMP HIS SOC

Spring 2012

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HIST 0273 - Confucius and Confucianism      

Confucius and Confucianism
Perhaps no individual has left his mark more completely and enduringly upon an entire civilization than Confucius (551-479 B.C.) has upon that of China. Moreover, the influence of Confucius has spread well beyond China to become entrenched in the cultural traditions of neighboring Japan and Korea and elsewhere. This course examines who Confucius was, what he originally intended, and how the more important of his disciples have continued to reinterpret his original vision and direct it toward different ends. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL HIS PHL

Spring 2011

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HIST 0287 - Modern Caribbean      

Modern Caribbean
In this course we will study the modern history of the Greater Antilles (Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Haiti, and Jamaica) from 1789 to the present day. We will pay close attention to the independence movement, abolition, construction of national cultures, and the impact of Europeans and Africans on each nation, as well as to the connections among these major islands in the 19th and 20th century and to the other islands and mainland nations. We will discuss diverse revolutionary political and cultural movements, issues of poverty and development, and issues of migration.

AAL HIS

Spring 2011, Spring 2013

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HIST 0288 - Modern Brazil      

Modern Brazil
Brazil is the Portuguese-speaking power of Latin America. In this course we will study the history of modern Brazil from independence to the present day, and discuss the contemporary developments that have transformed Brazil into an international force today. We will pay close attention to the construction of national institutions and culture in the 19th and 20th centuries. We will examine the major political, economic, and cultural movements that defined Brazilian history during the empire, the first republic, the Vargas era, and the military dictatorship. We will conclude with a look at Brazil's representative democracy from the 1980s to the present. (formerly HIST 0211) 3 hr. lect.

AAL HIS

Fall 2012, Fall 2013

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HIST 0305 - Confucius and Confucianism      

Confucius and Confucianism
Perhaps no individual has left his mark more completely and enduringly upon an entire civilization than Confucius (551-479 B.C.) has upon that of China. Moreover, the influence of Confucius has spread well beyond China to become entrenched in the cultural traditions of neighboring Japan and Korea and elsewhere. This course examines who Confucius was, what he originally intended, and how the more important of his disciples have continued to reinterpret his original vision and direct it toward different ends. Pre-1800. (formerly HIST/PHIL 0273) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL HIS PHL

Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014

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HIST 0308 - Race: Sci, Med. & Diversity      

The Power of Race: Science, Medicine, and Human Diversity
In this course, we will explore the manner in which ideologies of race have shaped the histories of science and medicine, and how scientists and medical practitioners have shaped the history of race. Topics will include the role of scientific knowledge in debates about racial slavery in the U.S., eugenics policies in the U.S. and Puerto Rico, tropical medicine in the Philippines, and public health policies in Los Angeles and San Francisco. We will pay particular attention to recent debates regarding the uses of race and genetic ancestry in biomedical research and practice, as well as genetic genealogy. 3 hrs. sem.

CMP HIS NOR

Spring 2013, Spring 2014

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HIST 0309 - Tech & Power in American Hist.      

Technology and Power in American History
In this course we will consider how technological artifacts and systems have constituted, mediated, and reproduced relationships of power with a particular attention to hierarchies of race, gender, class, and nation. We will examine the relationships between humans and technologies within the context of globalization from early colonial America through the 21st century. We will consider a variety of technologies and social settings such as guns, slave ships, plantations, factories, prisons, physical and virtual border fences, computers, mobile phones, human bodies, and reproduction. We will ask whether technology has produced a better America, and for whom. 3 hrs. sem.

HIS NOR

Fall 2013

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HIST 0310 - Film And History      

Film and History
In this class we will study the challenges and promises of film as a historical artifact by focusing on cinematic representation of social activism and struggles of liberation (from national and post-colonial struggles to the rise of ethnic consciousness and revolutionary movements of the 20th century). Students will examine how filmmakers present historical figures as well as the acts of ordinary citizens. In addition to researching the historical events represented on the screen, and exploring how film can be used as primary and secondary sources, we will also become involved in the creative process of historical representation. We will study films from countries around the world but most of our examples will come from Latin America and the Caribbean.

AAL HIS

Fall 2010

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HIST 0312 - Tokyo Between History & Utopia      

Tokyo: Between History and Utopia
In this course we will explore the history of Tokyo—from its "prehistory" as a small castle town in the 16th century to the cosmopolitan metropolis of the 20th century—and trace how Tokyo has captured the imagination as a space of possibility, of play, and for many, of decadence. Through a range of sources, including films, novels, ethnographies, and historical essays, we will use Tokyo as a "site" (both urban and ideological) through which to explore broader questions related to capitalist modernity, the formation of the nation-state, cultural identity, gender politics, and mass-culture. 3 hrs. sem.

AAL HIS SOC

Spring 2014

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HIST 0314 - Children of Russian Revolution      

Born Under a Red Star: Children of Russia’s Revolution at Home, at School, and at Play
To understand a particular society, consider how it regards its children. In the USSR, children represented more than future guardians of culture and tradition, they were the lifeblood of the revolution. The state's existence depended on how well it imbued its youth with the spirit of socialism. Soviet children were politically privileged, but also constant victims of poverty and political turmoil. In this seminar we will study their experiences at school, at home, and at play. Using schoolbooks, fairytales, diaries, drawings, and the material culture of sports, toys, and fashion, we will explore childhood (Soviet and otherwise) as a historically constructed phenomenon. 3 hrs. sem.

AAL HIS SOC

Spring 2014

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HIST 0315 - Health/Healing in African Hist      

Health and Healing in African History
In this course we will complicate our contemporary perspectives on health and healing in Africa by exploring diverse historical examples from the continent's deep past. Our readings, discussions, and papers will cover a range of historical contexts and topics, such as the politics of rituals and public healing ceremonies in pre-colonial contexts, state and popular responses to shifting disease landscapes in the colonial era, long-term cultural and economic changes in healer-patient dynamics, the problematic legacies of environmental health hazards in the post-colonial period, and Africans' engagement with global health interventions in recent decades. 3 hrs. sem.

AAL HIS SOC

Spring 2014

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HIST 0319 - Philosophy of History      

Readings in the Philosophy of History
Even before the appearance of Georg W. F. Hegel's classic study The Philosophy of History, a heated debate was being waged concerning the nature and substance of history. Is history, like science, expressible in predictable patterns or subject to irrevocable laws? What factors distinguish true history from the mere random succession of events? What should we assume to be the fundamental nature of historical truth, and are we to determine it objectively or subjectively? Is it possible to be human and yet be somehow "outside of" history? These are among the questions we will examine as we read and deliberate on a variety of philosophies of history, while concentrating on the most influential versions developed by Hegel and Karl Marx. 3 hrs. sem.

EUR HIS PHL

Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2015

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HIST 0322 - History of Latinos in the U.S.      

History of Latinos in the United States
In this course we will explore the historical experiences of the peoples from Latin America in the United States. We will trace these experiences from their roots prior to the 19th century through to the present. Within this population, we will consider the diversity of experiences along religious, ethnic, and racial lines. We will study the political, economic, social, and cultural impact of both large communities of Mexican, Cuban, and Puerto Rican immigrants and smaller communities of Dominican and Brazilian immigrants. We will also compare the experiences of other minority groups in the Unites States, such as African Americans, and with similar groups in Europe.

AAL CMP HIS

Spring 2012

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HIST 0327 - Aztec Empire/Spanish Conquest      

The Aztec Empire and the Spanish Conquest
This course centers around the rise and fall of the Aztecs, the first state-level society encountered by the Spanish in 1519. Although primarily known today for their military exploits for what today is Mexico, the Aztecs produced great artisans, artists, and philosophers whose contributions endure in contemporary Mexican culture. We will trace the origins and development of Aztec civilization to its encounter with the Spanish in 1519. The course also covers the Spanish background for the Conquest, from the martial and political expulsion of Moors and Jews from the Iberian Peninsula in 1492 to the Spanish Inquisition. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL CMP HIS SOC

Spring 2012, Spring 2014

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HIST 0331 - Sparta And Athens      

Sparta and Athens
For over 200 years, Athens and Sparta were recognized as the most powerful Greek city-states, and yet one was a democracy (Athens), the other an oligarchy (Sparta). One promoted the free and open exchange of ideas (Athens); one tried to remain closed to outside influence (Sparta). This course studies the two city-states from the myths of their origins through their respective periods of hegemony to their decline as imperial powers. The goal is to understand the interaction between political success and intellectual and cultural development in ancient Greece. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CMP EUR HIS LIT

Spring 2013

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HIST 0332 - Roman Law      

Roman Law
The Romans' codification of civil law is often considered their greatest intellectual achievement and most original and influential contribution to the world. This course treats the four main divisions of Roman law (persons, property, obligations, and succession). Great emphasis is placed on the role of law in Roman society. How did the law influence the lives of Roman citizens living under it? How did ordinary Roman citizens shape the law? Students will come to understand the principles of Roman law through actual cases. Designed for students with some background in Roman history and/or literature. 2 hrs. lect./1 disc.

EUR HIS

Spring 2014

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HIST 0337 - Greece and Rome      

From Alexander to Rome
At the age of 19, Alexander the Great set out to conquer the world. His successful domination of the eastern Mediterranean led to a new world order known as the Hellenistic Age. Under Alexander's successors, literature, art, and philosophy flourished, but a little more than a century later the Hellenistic Greeks found themselves on a collision course with Rome's expanding republic. This course will investigate the political and cultural history of the Greeks and Romans in this period and consider the forces that created the Graeco-Roman world. Readings include Arrian, the Alexandrian poets, Polybius, Livy, and Plutarch. (This course replaces CLAS/HIST 0338: The Hellenistic World and the Foundations of Graeco-Roman Culture.)

EUR HIS LIT

Spring 2011

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HIST 0350 - Shakespeare and History      

Shakespeare and History (Pre-1800)
In this course, students will explore a selection of Shakespeare's history plays (plus one tragedy and one comedy) alongside the chief issues of Tudor and Stuart history. The professors will employ a fully cross-disciplinary approach to literature and history laying equal stress on Shakespeare's plays and the cultural, political, and religious questions of the 16th and early 17th centuries. Topics will include the Reformation, the cult of Elizabeth, witchcraft, domestic life, urban London, and the English empire. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

EUR HIS LIT

Spring 2011

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HIST 0352 - Food History in Middle East      

Food in the Middle East: History, Culture, and Identity
Who invented Baklava? Was it the Greeks, Turks, Armenians, or maybe the Lebanese? In this course, we will examine the rich culinary history of the Middle East from the time of major Islamic Empires, such as the Abbasids and Ottomans, until the modern period. Through a close study of primary and secondary sources, including cookbooks and memoirs, we will explore the social, religious, literary, and economic place of food in the region. We will also investigate how, in the modern period, Middle Eastern peoples from different ethnic, geographic, and religious backgrounds have used food to express their distinct cultural, national, and gendered identities. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL CMP HIS SOC

Spring 2013, Spring 2014

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HIST 0359 - Experience of Total War      

The Experience of Total War
In this course we will explore how the two greatest conflicts of the 20th century--the First and Second World Wars--shaped the everyday lives of ordinary men and women. We will address such themes and problems as: the motivations to fight, war's role in individual development, the sources of obedience and mutiny, the phenomena of atrocity and genocide, experiences on the home front, and the reflection of war in culture and memory. Students will think critically across genres and national boundaries and will analyze fiction, personal narrative, and poetry from a historical perspective.

EUR HIS SOC

Fall 2011, Spring 2013

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HIST 0362 - Revolutionary America      

Revolutionary America: 1763-1800
A study of the origins, progress, and significance of the American Revolution. In this course we examine the diverse economies, cultures, and sociologies of the American Colonies on the eve of the Revolution; the disruption of the balance of empire in the Atlantic; the ideology which guided colonists in rebellion; the changes wrought by revolution; and the first decades of nationhood under the Constitution. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIS NOR

Spring 2014

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HIST 0364 - Civil War and Reconstruction      

Civil War and Reconstruction: 1845-1890
This course explores the era of the American Civil War with an emphasis on the period 1861-1865. It combines lectures, readings, class discussion, and film to address such questions as why the war came, why the Confederacy lost, and how the war affected various elements of society. We will also explore what was left unresolved at the end of the war, how Americans responded to Reconstruction, and how subsequent generations have understood the meaning of the conflict and its legacy. We will make a special effort to tie military and political events to life on the home front. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIS NOR

Spring 2011

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HIST 0368 - America, 1955-2000      

Twentieth-Century America, 1960-2000
This course concentrates on the history of the United States from the emergence of JFK's New Frontier until the eve of September 11, 2001. In particular, we will focus on the ways in which domestic development shaped America's place within the international community, and vice versa. Topics to be considered include: the rise and fall of the post-1945 social welfare state, decolonization and the Vietnam War, increasing American investment in the Middle East, the emergence of the "New Right," the end of the Cold War, and globalization and its contexts. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIS NOR

Spring 2011

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HIST 0369 - East India Company      

The East India Company
In this course you will be introduced to the English East India Company, from the 17th-century until its dissolution in 1858. Much of our focus will be on the Company’s presence in India, and we will pay particular attention to its transformation from a maritime trading company into a territorial colonial state. We will read a number of controversial texts from the period, immerse ourselves in the worlds of Company and Indian politics, and do guided research using holdings in Middlebury’s Special Collections. Topics will include the rise of the Company as a trading concern, its aggressive competition with other European trading monopolies and South Asian kingdoms, and the importance of opium in its dealings with China. We will end with a discussion of the Indian rebellion of 1857. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1308 or HIST 1009)

AAL HIS

Spring 2012, Fall 2013

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HIST 0371 - African American History      

African American History
This course will explore the history of the African American people from the slave trade to the present. It will examine the process of enslavement, the nature of American slavery, the meaning of emancipation, the response to the rise of legalized segregation, and the modern struggle for equality. Special attention will be given to placing the African American story within the context of the developing American nation, its institutions, and its culture. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIS NOR

Fall 2010

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HIST 0372 - The Civil Rights Revolution      

The Civil Rights Revolution
A study of the quest for a more inclusive American polity in the twentieth century. The modern civil rights movement is the central focus, but this course offers more than a survey of events from Montgomery to Memphis. It explores the pre-World War II roots of the modern black freedom struggle, the impact of the heroic phase of the civil rights movement, and the ambiguous developments since 1970. This course employs a "race relations" perspective, stressing the linkages among the experiences of African Americans, whites, and other groups. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CMP HIS NOR

Fall 2014

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HIST 0373 - History of American Women      

History of American Women: 1869-1999
This course will examine women's social, political, cultural, and economic position in American society from 1869 through the late 20th century. We will explore the shifting ideological basis for gender roles, as well as the effects of race, class, ethnicity, and region on women's lives. Topics covered will include: women's political identity, women's work, sexuality, access to education, the limits of "sisterhood" across racial and economic boundaries, and the opportunities women used to expand their sphere of influence. 3 hrs lect./disc.

CMP HIS NOR

Fall 2010, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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HIST 0375 - Struggles in Southern Africa      

Struggles for Change in Southern Africa
In this course we will examine the tumultuous period of social struggle in southern Africa in the decades following World War II. Major topics to be covered include the rise of apartheid and the mobilization of anti-apartheid resistance in South Africa and Namibia; the liberation struggle against white settler rule in Zimbabwe; the fight for freedom from Portuguese colonialism in Mozambique; and Mozambique's protracted civil war following independence. A central purpose of this course is to explore how these different arenas of struggle transformed individual lives and social relations in complex and diverse ways, generating enduring impacts and challenges within the region.

AAL HIS SOC

Spring 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2015

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HIST 0377 - Comparative Slavery      

Comparative Slavery in the Americas
In this course we will examine the development and decline of the institution of slavery in the United States between 1619 and 1865 by comparing the institution to slavery in the Caribbean and Latin America (principally Brazil). Themes and topics to be explored include: ecology and slavery, religion and slavery, the international slave trade, nationalisms and race, slave communities, slave resistance, emancipation, and freedom. Readings for the course will range from scholarly monographs to slave narratives.

CMP SOC

Fall 2013

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HIST 0391 - Native American / Imagination      

Native Americans in the American Imagination
In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will examine the changing image of Native Americans in American popular culture from 1800-2000. Through novels, plays, films, photography, advertisements, amusements, sport-team mascots, and museum displays, we will trace and analyze how the American Indian has been defined, appropriated, and represented popularly to Americans from the early republic to the turn of the twenty-first century. We will consider how American popular culture has used over time the image of the American Indian to symbolize national concerns and to forge a national American identity. 3 hrs. sem.

HIS NOR

Spring 2012, Spring 2014

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HIST 0393 - Gender in Early America      

A History of Gender in Early America
Exploration, conquest, settlement, revolution, and nation-building: no course in early American history should ignore such traditional topics. In this course, though, we will examine the various ways that gender shaped these historical processes. How, for example, did colonials’ assumptions about manhood and womanhood affect the development of slavery in America? Or how did the Founding Fathers’ identities as men inform their attitudes about democracy and citizenship? We will scrutinize historical documents, of both a private and public nature, and discuss several recent scholarly works on gender from 1600-1850 to consider these kinds of questions. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

CMP HIS NOR

Spring 2011, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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HIST 0395 - Mad Men and Mad Women      

“Mad Men and Mad Women”*
Are you a Don, a Roger, or a Pete? A Betty, a Peggy or a Joan? Using AMC's Mad Men as a visual and narrative foundation, we will examine masculinity and femininity in mid-20th century America. We will focus specifically on the connections between postwar mass communication and formation of gender roles, consumption, and cultural expectations. Our inquiry will then extend to recent discussions regarding the politics of historical representation. In addition to the television series, we will use a variety of both primary and secondary sources—including novels, magazines, sociological studies, and scholarly monographs—to achieve a multi-dimensional perspective. (Not open to students who have taken HIST 1017) 3 hrs. sem.

HIS NOR SOC

Spring 2014

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HIST 0397 - America and the Pacific      

America and the Pacific
If the 20th century was "America's Century," then it could also be deemed "America's Pacific Century" as interaction with Asia fundamentally shaped the United States' political, social, and diplomatic development. In this course we will examine American foreign relations on the Pacific Rim from the Philippine-American War to the Los Angeles riots of 1992. Topics to be covered include: America's imperial project in Asia, the annexation of Hawaii, Wilsonian diplomacy, the reconstruction of Japan after World War II, the Korean and Vietnam Wars, Richard Nixon's visit to Communist China, and the immigrant experience. 3 hrs sem.

HIS NOR

Fall 2010, Spring 2012, Spring 2015

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HIST 0400 - Readings in Medieval History:      

Readings in Medieval History
Topic is determined by the instructor - refer to section for the course description.

EUR HIS

Spring 2011

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HIST 0401 - Rdgs in Medieval History      

Readings in Medieval History: Sex and Society in Medieval and Early Modern Europe
Was there a medieval war between the sexes? Did women have a Renaissance? How were the institutions of medieval life gendered? Who were the witches, wives, virgins and whores of medieval and early modern Europe? We will consider such phenomena as "holy anorexics," "bridal mysticism," the gendered nature of medieval monasticism and the construction of monasteries, and the witch hunt of early modern Europe. Through intensive analysis of both primary and secondary sources, this course will examine the history of women but also of gender in pre-modern Europe. 3 hr. sem. (formerly HIST0423)

EUR HIS

Spring 2011

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HIST 0403 - Readings in European History      

Readings in Modern European History: Scottish and Irish Identities
This seminar studies the development of Scottish and Irish national identities, from 1603 to 1922. Scotland and Ireland have had complicated and often tempestuous relationships with each other and with England, the long-dominant power in the British Isles. We will examine the social, political and cultural consequences, from the union of crowns under James I, to creation of the Irish Free State after World War I. Particular attention will be paid to rebellions, civil wars, religious changes, population shifts, literary movements and mass political organizations that have helped to shape national identities on both sides of the Irish Sea. 3 hrs. sem.

Spring 2013

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HIST 0406 - Rdgs Modern European History      

Readings in Modern European History: Enlightenment, Revolution, and Terror*
The French Revolution provided a model for democratic political reform throughout the world, spreading new ideas about equality, national identity, and rights for minorities. Although informed by the Enlightenment and progressive social thought, it led to the Terror, a period of violence and repression in the name of revolutionary change. We will examine this attempt to create a just society and the corresponding violence against internal and external enemies. We will also consider the Revolution’s origins, the events in France, the shock tremors throughout the world, and the long-term repercussions of change. (formerly HIST 0401) 3 hrs. sem.

HIS NOR

Spring 2011, Fall 2012

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HIST 0408 - Rdgs Modern European History      

Readings in Modern European History: The Nazis and the Jews
Hitler and his functionaries in the Nazi Party initiated and led a vicious campaign to annihilate the Jews of Europe during the Second World War. This seminar will examine the issues and events that helped shape the National Socialist worldview of individuals and groups during the Nazi Holocaust, and will close with an examination of how modern European cultures have addressed the legacy of the Nazi past, including such topics as Holocaust denial and memorialization. (formerly HIST 0424) 3 hr. sem.

EUR HIS

Fall 2010, Fall 2011

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HIST 0410 - Readings in Soviet History      

Readings in Soviet History: The "New Man" in the Russian and Soviet Imagination
In this seminar we will examine that superman of modernity who inspired and terrified a century of Russian philosophers, artists, and revolutionaries: the New Man. We will explore the emergence and development of this ideal type between the 1840s and the 1940s. We will trace how radical socialists and religious conservatives constantly re-conceptualized him, and we will study Soviet attempts to transform its citizens into New Men and Women through Marxism-Leninism. Readings will include many of Russia's greatest philosophical and literary works of the period.

AAL HIS SOC

Fall 2010, Spring 2012, Fall 2013

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HIST 0411 - Rdgs Amer HI: Environmental HI      

Readings in American History: American Environmental History
Although the U.S. has long been thought "nature's nation," scholars have only begun to include the study of human interactions with nature in their study of the American past. This course will examine the history of interactions between human beings and their physical environments in North America, through readings that bring plants, animals, climates, and landscapes as well as human culture, politics, labor, race, and gender into histories of settlement, capitalism, urbanization, region, science, and policy. Readings will also trace the emergence of this new field, and the problems inherent in creating a more inclusive account of the past. 3 hrs sem. (formerly HIST 0406)

HIS NOR

Spring 2013

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HIST 0412 - Rdgs Amer Hi: Cultures-Contact      

Readings in American History: Cultures in Contact
In this course we will examine the dimensions of cultural contact among Native Americans, Europeans, African Americans, and Euro Americans in the eastern half of the United States, from early encounters at Roanoke, to Cherokee removal to Oklahoma. Themes of investigation include: encounter vs. invasion; Indian depopulation by men, microbes, and munitions; religious conversion; cultural persistence, change, and revitalization; slavery by and of Indians; and the changeable image of the Indian. (formerly HIST 0407) 3 hrs. sem.

HIS NOR

Spring 2013, Fall 2014

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HIST 0414 - Rds in 20th Cent Amer History      

Readings in American History: The Cold War at Home and Abroad
This course will examine America's Cold War experience from both international and domestic perspectives. In addition to official U.S. foreign policy, readings will consider topics such as: federal state formation, immigration, the struggle for civil rights, shifting definitions of liberalism and conservatism, the military-industrial complex, and anti-communist campaigns waged by private citizens. Rather than divorcing the global and national dimensions of the American Cold War, we will explore their points of convergence and use them to complicate our understandings of the "postwar" era. (formerly HIST 0409) 3 hrs. sem.

HIS NOR

Fall 2011

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HIST 0415 - Rdgs US History-Protest      

Readings in American History: The Protest Impulse
An exploration of the protest impulse in American history, with particular attention given to the American Revolutionaries, Populists, and Civil Rights activists. Among the key questions to be explored are: What are the principal causes of insurgency? What is the relationship between a leader and a protest movement? Is there an American protest tradition? Why are some insurgent groups more successful than others? As these questions are discussed, we will examine the qualities of good scholarship, the role of theory in history, and the influence of political commitments on the shaping of interpretation. (formerly HIST 0410) 3 hrs. sem

HIS NOR

Spring 2014

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HIST 0416 - Rdgs US History-Amer West      

Readings in American History: The American West
The last few decades have brought an explosion of new historical research and writing on the American West, in fields ranging from environmental, cultural, and urban history to Native American, gender, social and labor history. We will explore how scholars define and interpret the region which, perhaps more than others, has come to define the United States as a nation and Americans as a diverse people. Readings will trace how the West was created, conquered, settled, and transformed, and will explore the vibrant contests over land, democracy, identity, and mythic imagination that define the region. (formerly HIST 0411) 3 hrs. sem.

AAL HIS PHL

Fall 2010

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HIST 0417 - Modern Am Indian Social Hist      

Modern American Indian Social History
Popular narratives of American Indian history often conclude with the 1890 Wounded Knee Massacre and fail to acknowledge the endurance and resurgence of modern Indian nations. In this readings seminar, we will examine Native life and the processes of accommodation, resistance, renewal, and change from the reservation era to the present. Course topics will include: treaty rights and tribal sovereignty, federal Indian policy, pan-Indian movements, reservation governance and economic development, cultural revitalization, conflict over natural resources, identity politics, and urban experiences. We will also reflect upon the various interdisciplinary sources and interdisciplinary methods of American Indian studies. 3 hrs. sem.

HIS NOR SOC

Spring 2012

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HIST 0419 - Rdgs African HI: Environmental      

Readings in African History: Environmental History of Africa
This seminar will explore the history of human-environmental interaction on the African continent. The course examines how scholars have begun unraveling dominant historical understandings of African landscapes, cultures, and pre-colonial ecologies. A major portion of the course looks at how colonial relations shaped conflicts over environmental control and ecological change and the legacies of such dynamics in the postcolonial era. Readings on gender relations, urban environmental change, and the evolution of development thinking will be the focus of class discussions on new ways of interpreting African social and environmental change. 3 hr. sem.

AAL HIS

Spring 2011

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HIST 0427 - Diaspora & Trans-nationalism      

Diaspora and Trans-nationalism
In this course we will explore the global flow of people across national boundaries in the modern era. During the first part of the course we will examine the major theoretical frameworks of transnational migration and diasporas by reading the works of writers such as Hannah Arendt, Edward Said, and W. E. B. Dubois. We will focus on the social and cultural processes that pose challenges to the traditional hegemony of the nation-state, and examine the political and economic relations of diaspora communities to homeland. In the second half of the course we will study how organic intellectuals, performers, and other artists from all across the Atlantic world agitated to transform the social dynamics within the political, linguistic, and geographical boundaries of their new home while re-imagining new relations with the place they once called home. Students will choose a research topic on a diaspora community of their interest and be required to make direct contact with the communities we study. 3 hrs. sem. (formerly HIST 0413)

AAL CMP HIS

Fall 2011, Spring 2014

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HIST 0428 - Blame it On Bossa Nova      

Blame It On Bossa Nova: The History of a Transnational Phenomenon
What is bossa nova and what impact did it have on the world? In this course we will examine the history of this complex international phenomenon and its connection to social and political trends of the 1950s and 1960s. We will study the national and transnational impact of bossa nova and the post-World War II development of the bossa nova aesthetic and ethos in Latin America, Europe (particularly France), and the United States. Our study of bossa nova will also help us discuss broader philosophical questions such as how we define who owns a cultural product, why we consume cultural products from abroad, and whether we can truly understand other cultures in translation?

CMP HIS

Spring 2013

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HIST 0429 - Gandhi      

Gandhi
This course will focus on the works and actions of Mahatma Gandhi. At one level, the readings will provide an introduction to the philosophy and life of one of the most significant, influential, and well-known figures of the 20th century. At another level, the course will discuss in detail the major themes and occurrences in modern Indian history, tracing the rise and ultimate victory of the Indian nationalist movement. The class will read a variety of texts, including books written by Gandhi, tracts published by his political and religious opponents, social commentaries, contemporary novels, and engaging histories. (formerly HIST 0414)3 hrs. sem

AAL HIS

Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2013, Spring 2014

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HIST 0430 - East Asia/Japan's Long Postwar      

Readings in Modern East Asian History: Post-colonial East Asia and Japan's "Long Postwar"
With the end of the Cold War and the death of Emperor Hirohito in 1989, long simmering debates reignited over the meaning of Japan's prewar empire in East Asia, Japanese wartime atrocities, and the reconfiguration of East Asia within the Cold War. In this course, students will investigate how events from over 60 years ago have continued to reproduce national identities and geopolitical relations in postwar East Asia. Through a variety of novels, films, and historical analyses, we will investigate the limits of, and tensions between, individual experience, memory, national history, and geopolitics. 3 hrs. sem.

AAL CMP HIS

Fall 2010, Spring 2013

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HIST 0431 - China's Historical Minorities      

Readings in Chinese History: China's Historical Minorities
We tend reflexively to visualize China as an ethnically homogeneous nation-state. However, this conception fails to account for the minority populations that have for centuries resided in China and contributed greatly to its socio-cultural identity. Throughout the imperial age, the four groups called Manchu, Mongol, Hui, and Tibetan surpassed all other non-Chinese ethnicities in influencing the direction of Chinese history and shaping the contours of China's developmental experience. In this reading seminar we will examine the imprint of the collective legacy of these particular minorities as well as those of certain related groups, such as the ancestors of the Uyghurs of modern Xinjiang. 3 hrs. sem.

AAL HIS SOC

Spring 2013, Spring 2014

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HIST 0434 - Readings in Chinese History      

Readings in Chinese History: Revolution and Culture in Twentieth Century China
In this seminar, we will examine the dynamics of socio-cultural transformation in China during the 20th century. Through films, novels, critical essays, and a range of secondary sources, we will investigate the ways in which Chinese intellectuals and activists defined “culture” and conceptualized its role in social transformation. Topics will include early 20th century language reform, art and film in interwar Shanghai, and leftwing literature and printmaking movements. We will also consider the origins and aspirations of the 1966-1976 Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution and the ways that it has been remembered in the post-Mao era. (formerly HIST 0417) 3 hrs. sem.

AAL HIS

Fall 2011

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HIST 0436 - Readings in Japanese History      

Readings in Japanese History: Modernism and Fascism between the World Wars
The 1920s in Japan is typically understood as a period of political and cultural experimentation, as witnessed by the rise of avant-garde cultural groups and radicalized social movements. In contrast, the 1930s is portrayed as Japan's "dark valley", in which this sense of experimentation was suppressed or co-opted by the state. In this course, we will revisit these tumultuous decades by engaging with a range of historical assessments, novels, and critical essays. We will begin by examining theories of modernism and fascism, and then explore the changing socio-cultural milieu in interwar Japan, including mass-culture, modernization, romanticism, imperialism, and utopianism. (formerly HIST 0418)

AAL HIS

Spring 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2015

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HIST 0438 - Women and Islam      

Readings in Middle Eastern History: Women and Islam
In this course we will examine women's lives in Islamic societies from the seventh century to the contemporary period, focusing on the Middle East and North Africa. Readings will explore a variety of topics including the changing role of women from pre-Islamic to Islamic societies; women in the Qur’an and in Islamic law gender roles in relation to colonialism, nationalism, an Islamism; the experience of women in Sunni and Shi’a contexts; and Western images of Muslim women. (formerly HIST 0416) 3 hrs. sem.

AAL HIS PHL

Spring 2012, Spring 2014

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HIST 0439 - Ottomans in MidEast & Balkans      

Readings on Ottoman History in the Middle East and the Balkans
The Ottoman Empire arose from the rubble of waning Islamic and Byzantine empires and became the longest lasting Islamic empire in history. In this seminar we will explore the rise of the empire, from its nascence as an unknown tribe in thirteenth-century western Anatolia to its formidable dominance of the Mediterranean and European worlds in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, and on to its responses to European ascendancy on the eve of modernity. Selected readings will help us explore its origins, its political, social, and cultural structures, as well as its multi-ethnic and multi-cultural identity, with particular attention to its influence on the Balkans and the Arab Middle East during the early modern period. 3 hrs. sem.

AAL HIS

Spring 2013

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HIST 0441 - Rdgs African HI: Environmental      

Readings in African History: Environmental History of Africa
This seminar will explore the history of human-environmental interaction on the African continent. The course examines how scholars have begun unraveling dominant historical understandings of African landscapes, cultures, and pre-colonial ecologies. A major portion of the course looks at how colonial relations shaped conflicts over environmental control and ecological change and the legacies of such dynamics in the postcolonial era. Readings on gender relations, urban environmental change, and the evolution of development thinking will be the focus of class discussions on new ways of interpreting African social and environmental change. (formerly HIST 0419) 3 hr. sem.

AAL HIS

Fall 2012

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HIST 0442 - Popular Culture/History/Africa      

Popular Culture and History in Africa
In recent years scholars of the African past have increasingly turned their attention to the multiple arenas of "popular culture" that have helped shape and express Africans' histories. In this course, we will explore the diverse thematic range of such approaches and the new conceptual lenses they bring to interpreting African colonial and post-colonial history. Readings and seminar discussions will touch on such varied historical topics as Africans as producers and consumers of popular photography, film/video, and music; the politics of fashion; and local dynamics of sports and leisure. (Formerly HIST 0420) 3 hrs. sem.

AAL HIS SOC

Spring 2013

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HIST 0443 - Readings in African History      

Readings in African History: Women and Gender in Africa
This course takes up the challenge of understanding women's experiences and the role of gender in Africa's past. We will read from a wide variety of disciplinary perspectives and literary forms, including ethnographies, life histories, and fiction, in order to explore different methodological and interpretive approaches to these subjects. Themes will include: changes in the structure of patriarchy and women's status in the pre-colonial period, the gendered impact of colonial rule on African economies and ecologies, historical identities of masculinity and femininity, and gendered experience of postcolonial "development." Prior experience in African history is not required. (formerly HIST/WAGS 0421) 3 hrs. seminar

AAL HIS

Spring 2012, Spring 2015

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HIST 0450 - U.S./Soviet Popular Culture      

Twentieth-Century U.S. and Soviet Popular Culture
In this comparative history seminar we will examine the United States and Russia from the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917 through the Cold War. Popular culture provides rich material and suggests analytical frameworks for examining American and Soviet perceptions of each other. It also invites critical analysis of each society's "way of being": their cultural values, political priorities, assumptions, and their personal and national identities. Students will examine the ways popular culture informed social movements and international relations, paying close attention to changes and continuities across the 20th century. Of particular interest is the way that popular culture, which initially was used to drive a wedge between American and Soviet peoples, eventually became an unexpected force of rapprochement in the 1970s and 1980s. Throughout the seminar students will consider how race, class, and gender shape cultural understandings of identity. This course is equivalent to IGST 0450.

CMP HIS SOC

Spring 2013

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HIST 0472 - Buddhist/Christian Monasticism      

“The Religious Life”: Buddhist and Christian Monastic Traditions Compared*
Both Buddhism and Christianity include traditions of monasticism, of men and women leaving home for “the religious life.” In this course, we will study and compare Buddhist and Christian monasticism from historical and religious perspectives. We will read primary sources, from the Life of St. Anthony and the Rule of St. Benedict to the verses attributed to the first Buddhist nuns and a Zen monastic code. We will examine monastic vocation, the integration of monasteries into society, and the adaptation of monasticism to different cultures. Throughout, we will highlight the role of gender. We will conclude with attention to contemporary manifestations of monastic culture. This course is equivalent to INTL 0472 and RELI 0472. 3 hr sem.

CMP HIS PHL

Spring 2012

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HIST 0475 - Imperial/Anti-Imperial Asia      

Imperialism and Anti-Imperialism in Asia
In this seminar we will examine patterns of Euro-American and Japanese imperialism in South, East, and Southeast Asia during the 19th and 20th centuries. We will focus on the ways in which scholars and revolutionaries have made sense of the workings of colonial power and formulated strategies for resistance. By engaging with novels, films, and political manifestos, students will gain a broad understanding of how imperialism transformed lifeworlds, how its cultural, social, and economic dimensions have been critiqued, and the formation of nationalist, Marxist, and Pan-Asianist movements. Readings will include works by V.I. Lenin , Mao Zedong, Ho Chi Minh, Pramoedya Ananta Toer, and Ranajit Guha. This course is equivalent to IGST 0475. 3 hrs seminar.

AAL CMP HIS SOC

Spring 2012, Spring 2015

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HIST 0479 - Chinese-American Relations      

Pacific Century: Chinese-American Relations 1898-2008
In this course we will examine Chinese-American relations from the Boxer Uprising through the Beijing Olympics. We will explore the multi-dimensional nature of the bond between these two nations, looking at socio-economic, political, and cultural elements of their "special relationship." Course themes will include westward empire and the scramble for territory in China; the formation and mutation of American orientalism; and ways in which Chinese politicians and intellectuals have strategically mobilized with and against the expansion of U.S. power in the Pacific. Texts will include scholarly monographs, Hollywood films, and writings by figures such as Soong May-ling, Mao Zedong, and W.E.B DuBois.

AAL CMP HIS

Spring 2011

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HIST 0480 - Globalization/Hist Perspective      

Globalization in Historical Perspective
In this course, we will examine dynamics of colonial and capital expansion that have reshaped the globe since the 1700s. We will read classical social theorists, contemporary scholars, and novelists to discern ways in which human life around the world has been intertwined and differentiated. We will consider the formation of categories such as "West" and "East," the racialized and gendered ways in which colonizers have distinguished themselves from the colonized, and strategies by which these boundaries and hierarchies have been challenged. Students will gain a broad understanding of modern world history and a critical framework for evaluating imperialism. This course is equivalent to IGST 0480.

AAL CMP HIS SOC

Fall 2012

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HIST 0500 - Special Research Projects      

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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HIST 0600 - History Research Seminar      

History Research Seminar
All history majors who have not taken a writing and research seminar are required to take HIST 0600 in their junior fall or, if abroad at that time, their senior fall semester. In this course, students will conceive, research, and write a work of history based on primary source material to the degree possible. After reading and discussion on historical methods and research strategies, students will pursue a paper topic as approved by the course professors. HIST 0600 is also open to International Studies and Environmental Studies majors with a disciplinary focus in history. 3 hr. sem

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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HIST 0700 - Senior Independent Study      

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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HIST 1017 - Mad Men and Mad Women      

Mad Men/ and Mad Women*
Are you a Don, a Roger, or a Pete? A Betty, a Peggy or a Joan? Using AMC’s Mad Men as a visual and narrative foundation, this course examines masculinity and femininity in mid-20th century America. We will focus specifically on the connections between postwar mass communication and formation of gender roles, consumption and cultural expectations. Our inquiry will then extend to recent discussions regarding the politics of historical representation. In addition to the television series we will use a variety of both primary and secondary sources -- including novels, magazines, sociological studies, and scholarly monographs – to achieve a multi-dimensional perspective.

HIS NOR WTR

Winter 2012

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HIST 1018 - African Consumers      

African Consumers
In this course we will explore how Africans variously situated across the continent have acted throughout history as cultural and economic consumers. Readings, discussions, and film screenings will touch on such diverse topics as Africans’ use of second-hand clothing from the West, the marketing and consumption of soap and hygiene products, the trade and consumption of food, the production and reception of popular videos and photography, and young peoples’ interactions with the global circulation of music and communications technology.

AAL CW HIS SOC WTR

Winter 2011

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HIST 1022 - Tokyo History & Utopia      

Tokyo: Between History and Utopia
In this course we will explore the history of Tokyo – from backwater village in the 16th century to the cosmopolitan metropolis of the 20th century – and trace how Tokyo has captured the imagination as a space of possibility, play, consumption, and, for many, decadence. Through a range of sources, including film, novels, ethnographies, and historical essays, we will use Tokyo as a lens through which to explore broader questions related to capitalist modernity, the formation of the modern nation-state, cultural identity, the politics of gender, and mass-culture.

AAL HIS WTR

Winter 2013

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HIST 1023 - Unnatural Border      

Unnatural Border
In this course we will explore how the U.S.-Mexico border transformed from a “line in the sand” to a place of increasing physical presence. The 20th century brought customs stations and fences to channel bodies through a federally regulated space. Over time, fences and check points transformed into walls, buildings, and a network of roads built to control the movement of mobile nature: people, animals, and pathogens. Using both primary and secondary texts, documentaries, and news articles, we will learn why federal agencies created an unnatural border and how it has affected immigration and the environment in the borderlands. This course counts as elective credit towards the History major.

NOR SOC WTR

Winter 2013, Winter 2014

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HIST 1024 - Italian and U.S. Culture      

“Il Nuovo Mondo:” Italian Contributions to American Culture*
Between 1880 and 1920, more than four millions Italians migrated to the U.S.A. In this course we will explore this diaspora in historical, social, and economic terms by analyzing the situation in Italy in the 1860s and 1870s and the perception of the new world as a “promised land.” We will consider the hardship of the uprooting experience of every migrant, the conflicts with previous immigrants, and the problems of cultural integration. We will also examine the Italian-American contributions to various areas of American life (e.g. music, food, etc.) We will also explore the exceptional situation of Italians in Vermont.

CMP HIS NOR WTR

Winter 2014

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HIST 1025 - Ni Yankees ni Marxismo:Peron      

Ni Yankees ni Marxismo: Peronismo: Its Origins and Political Development, Its Cultural Projection, and Its Relationship with the U.S. (Offered in English)
In this course we will consider the rise of Populism and its political experience in Argentina in order to study the cultural core of the Peronist social movement. Through the study of oral history, popular culture, and personalities such as Juan Perón, Eva Perón, and Brasil’s Getúlio Vargas we will examine the building of political popular sentiment and the continental nature of Populism. In addition we will examine the interaction between Peronism and U.S. foreign policy and how it shaped the Argentinian experience. This course counts as elective credit towards the History major.

AAL SOC WTR

Winter 2014

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