Middlebury

 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

LNGT 0101 - Introduction to Linguistics      

Introduction to Linguistics
This is an introductory course in linguistics taught in English. The main topics will include the nature of human language as distinct from other communication systems; the subsystems of linguistic knowledge, i.e., sound patterns (phonology), word-formation (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), and meaning (semantics); language and the brain; language acquisition; language use in context; geographical and social dialects; and historical development of language and language change. (Formerly INTD 0112) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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LNGT 0102 - Intro to Sociolinguistics      

Introduction to Sociolinguistics
In this course, we will explore the ways that language creates and reflects social identities. We will look at the contextual factors-social, cultural, geographical, political, etc.-that impact language use and variation. Themes for this course will include linguistic variation, language and identity, language policy, and language in the media. We will consider questions such as: What distinguishes a language from a dialect? How and why do some language varieties become privileged? How do notions of politeness and respect vary across linguistic contexts? In essence, we will learn how language shapes our world, and how we shape language itself.

SOC

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014

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LNGT 0107 - Introduction to TESOL      

Introduction to TESOL
In this course we will study theories and practices relevant to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and abroad. We will examine curricular resources used with adolescent and adult learners, and practice developing materials applicable to a variety of classroom settings. We will also discuss critical issues in the field, such as linguistic prejudice, language maintenance, and social justice pedagogy. Class sessions are largely hands-on, and include student teaching demonstrations with peer feedback. Opportunities for community engagement are also available. The final project is a portfolio that includes a personal philosophy of teaching. (Not open to students who have taken LNGT/EDST 1003)

Fall 2013

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LNGT 0109 - Language, Culture, Society      

Language, Culture and Society
In this course students will be introduced to the comparative, ethnographic study of language in relation to socio-cultural context. Our readings will be drawn from diverse global settings and will focus upon language as the means by which people shape and are shaped by the social worlds in which they live. We will examine contrasts in ways of speaking across different communities, personal identities, and institutions. We will explore the consequences of communicative difference across a range of contact situations, including everyday conversation among peers, service encounters, political elections, and global connections or disconnections made possible through new media. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)/

CMP SOC

Spring 2014

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LNGT 0110 - Eng Grammar: Concepts & Contro      

English Grammar: Concepts and Controversie
In this course we will study the structure of the English language, learning key terms and strategies for analyzing English syntax. We will explore English grammar from both prescriptive and descriptive perspectives and examine its relevance to language policy, linguistic prejudice, and English education. Readings will be drawn from a variety of texts, including Rhetorical Grammar (2009), Eats, Shoots & Leaves (2006), Language Myths (1999), and Origins of the Specious (2010). This course is relevant to students wanting to increase their own knowledge of the English language, as well as to those seeking tools for English teaching and/or research.

SOC

Spring 2013

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LNGT 0130 - Secret Lives of Words      

The Secret Lives of Words
In this course students will learn to use the Oxford English Dictionary to trace the origins of English words from their Proto-Indo-European roots to their modern English meanings, examining how cultural demands, conflict, gender, and the historical movements of peoples affect, and are affected by, words. In addition we will explore the politics of lexicography. Students will learn to identify the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes, and suffixes of English words, and will be introduced to common shifts in word formation as words are absorbed into English from other languages.

Spring 2014

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LNGT 0201 - Intro to Romance Ling      

Introduction to Romance Linguistics
This course welcomes students and speakers of French, Italian, Latin, Portuguese, and Spanish who are curious about linguistics and wish to undertake a comparative study of the Romance linguistic family as a whole. We shall review the basic principles and methods of the linguistic science and immediately apply them to the rich and fascinating data drawn from the history of the Romance languages. Through alternating internal (structural) and external (socio-cultural) approaches to the study of languages, our goal is to construct a coherent vision of unity and diversity that at once characterize the native languages of more than 900 million speakers worldwide. (LNGT 0101 or by approval) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMP EUR SOC

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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LNGT 0205 - L2Acquisition & Ed. Tech.      

Second Language Acquisition (SLA) and Educational Technology
In this course we will study the relationship between second language acquisition (SLA) theory, foreign language (FL) instruction, and the use of educational technology. We will examine various aspects of first and second language learning/acquisition. SLA theories and research findings will then provide a framework to explore FL instruction and computer assisted learning (CALL) applications. Based on an experiential project development approach, this course will offer students opportunities to critically assess existing CALL applications and to design learning materials based on SLA current and relevant research. Class sessions are designed to be hands-on and interactive. (Not open to students who have taken LNGT/EDST 1004) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Fall 2012

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LNGT 0210 - Intro Japanese Linguistics      

Introduction to Japanese Linguistics (in English)
This course will provide an introduction to linguistics theories as applied to the study of Japanese. Through the exploration of a language that is very different from Indo-European languages, students will gain a better understanding of how human languages work and are structured. The relationship of language to culture will be a central theme in the course. Topics covered will include key concepts in linguistics, Japanese linguistics, culture, and pedagogy. This course will be taught in English; no Japanese language or linguistics knowledge required. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL

Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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LNGT 0225 - Arabic Linguistics      

Introduction to Arabic Linguistics
In this course we will focus on the study of Arabic as a “language system" in terms of the frameworks and tools of modern linguistic analysis. Topics covered include the sound system (phonology), word structure (morphology), phrase and sentence structure (syntax), meaning at the word and sentential level (semantics), as well as the history of Arabic and the Arabic grammatical tradition. We will give equal attention to the study of the linguistic features of both Standard Arabic and the modern Arabic dialects of today. Readings will be drawn from a variety of sources, including descriptive grammars and modern linguistic analyses. (ARBC 0103 or equivalent) 3 hrs lect/disc.

AAL LNG

Spring 2012, Spring 2014

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LNGT 0226 - Phonetics and Phonology      

The Sounds of Language: Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology
In this course we will study the description and analysis of speech: how the sounds of language are physiologically produced, acoustically represented, and psychologically perceived and categorized. Through acoustic and phonological analysis, students will develop the skills to distinguish and produce the sounds of the world’s languages, as well as explore the sound systems of different languages, in order to determine which patterns differ and which patterns are common to all. Students will hone their analytical and technical skills by solving phonological problem sets as well as by using computer software (Praat) to analyze the acoustics of speech. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

SCI

Fall 2014

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LNGT 0227 - Arabic Sociolinguistics      

Arabic Sociolinguistics (taught in English)
In this course we will focus on the inter-relationships between the way Arabic is used by native speakers and the various social contexts affecting that usage. In particular, we will discuss the phenomenon of diglossia in Arabic speech communities (that is, the co-existence of Modern Standard Arabic with the vernacular Arabic dialects of today); aspects of linguistic variation and change in the Arab world; the relation between register and language; as well as the relation between language and such sociological variables as education, social status, political discourse, and gender. Readings are primarily drawn from sociolinguists' studies in the Arab world. (ARBC 0101 or instructor's approval) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL SOC

Spring 2013

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LNGT 0232 - Nature and Origin of Language      

The Nature and Origin of Language
This course will provide students with the basic principles and tools needed to study and explore languages. Relying on philology and contemporary linguistics, we will examine both the history of human language, along with recent efforts to explain its origin and development. This course will encourage individual effort and learning by incorporating independent readings, research, and weekly written and oral presentations.

Spring 2014

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LNGT 0250 - Morphology and Syntax      

The Structure of Language: Introduction to Morphology and Syntax
In this course we will focus on two fundamental areas in the study of language structure: morphology and syntax. Morphology is the study of the internal structure of words and their meaningful parts (e.g., roots and affixes), whereas syntax studies how words are combined to form larger units (phrases and sentences). Linguistic data for illustration and analysis will be taken both from English and a variety of languages belonging to different language families to help us better understand the unity and diversity of human language with regard to word and sentence structure. The course is intended to enhance students’ skills in linguistic description and analysis, as well as general problem-solving and analytical reasoning skills. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Spring 2015

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LNGT 0270 - Chinese Sociolinguistics      

Chinese Sociolinguistics (taught in English)
Sociolinguistics is mainly concerned with the interaction of language and society. The language situation in China is unique both in the modern world and in human history. We will gain a good understanding of sociolinguistics as a scientific field of inquiry through exploring the Chinese situation in this course. Some of the questions we will ask are: What is Mandarin (Modern Standard) Chinese? Who are "native speakers" of Mandarin? Are most Chinese people monolingual (speaking only one language) or bilingual (speaking two languages) or even multilingual? How many "dialects" are there in China? What is the difference between a "language" and a "dialect"? Are Chinese characters "ideographs", i.e., "pictures" that directly represent meaning and have nothing to do with sound? Why has the pinyin romanization system officially adopted in the 1950s never supplanted the Chinese characters? Why are there traditional and simplified characters? We will also explore topics such as power, register, verbal courtesy, gender and language use. Students are encouraged to compare the Chinese situation with societies that they are familiar with. (One semester of Chinese language study or by waiver)

AAL SOC

Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014

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LNGT 0280 - Formal Semantics      

Logic and Formal Semantics
Using logical and mathematical tools, formal semantics answers the following questions: Why do sentences mean what they mean? How is reasoning possible? How does language structure our understanding of time, change, knowledge, morality, identity, and possibility? This course is well suited for students interested in computer science, linguistics, logic, mathematics, or philosophy. (PHIL 0180; pending instructor’s approval, PHIL 0180 may be taken contemporaneously with PHIL/LNGT 0280. Students who take these two courses simultaneously will meet for 6 total contact hours.) 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc

DED PHL

Fall 2014

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LNGT 0303 - Intro Span Phonetics/Pronunc.      

Introduction to Spanish Phonetics and Pronunciation
In this course we will study the sound system of Spanish with the aims of introducing the fields of phonetics and phonology while improving pronunciation. Students will become familiar with phonetic transcription, comparing and contrasting articulatory and acoustic characteristics of Spanish as well as English in order to understand and implement different phonological patterns produced by native speakers of Spanish. Additionally, we will discuss major pronunciation differences across the Spanish-speaking world. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

LNG

Fall 2012, Spring 2014, Fall 2014

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LNGT 0317 - Spanish Pronunciation      

Spanish Pronunciation: How to Sound Like a Native Speaker
Why do language learners have a “foreign” accent? Why do native Spanish speakers roll their r’s so effortlessly? In this course we will explore basic concepts in phonetics and phonology in order to demystify the difficulties that second language learners face while learning Spanish pronunciation. By comparing and contrasting the sound systems of Spanish and English, as well as how their sounds are produced and perceived, students will acquire the theoretical and practical tools to make your Spanish pronunciation more native-like. (SPAN 0220 or equivalent)

LNG WTR

Winter 2013

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LNGT 0331 - Multilingualism in Africa      

Multilingualism and Second Language Acquisition in Africa
Why do most people from Swaziland to Morocco speak several languages? What is to be gained by using more than one language in conversation? How does language teaching determine power relations? In this course we will reflect upon our own linguistic encounters, while contextualizing the experience of the individual within society as a language learner and speaker. We will discuss the rich linguistic profiles of the African continent from proto-linguistic to neocolonial and critically explore language ideology and second language identity in African countries through the lenses of government, education, and popular culture. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL SOC

Spring 2013, Fall 2013

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LNGT 0332 - Language, Identity, & Politics      

Language, Identity, Politics in the Post-Soviet Space and the Balkans (in English)
In this course we will investigate the relationship between language, identity, and politics in post-Soviet and Balkan countries and examine the role that language has played in the region’s violent conflicts. We will look at the wars accompanying the dissolution of Yugoslavia and investigate how linguistic issues played into the post-Soviet development of Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, and Estonia. We also will trace the link between language laws and current violence in Ukraine. Drawing on a combination of academic writing and cultural artifacts, we will illuminate issues such as linguistic nationalism, language laws, rights of minority languages, language discrimination, language and religion, alphabet issues, and language and dialect as ethnic identity. No knowledge of Russian required. (LNGT 0102 recommended) 3 hrs lect./disc.

EUR SOC

Fall 2014

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LNGT 0354 - Philosophy of Language      

Philosophy of Language
Speaking a language is a complex form of behavior that plays a rich and varied role in human life. The philosophy of language seeks to give a philosophical account of this phenomenon, focusing on such questions as: How does language gain meaning? How does it differ from animal communication? Is language in some sense innate? Other topics to be addressed include: theories of reference and truth; the relation between language, thought, and reality; and theories of metaphor. Readings from philosophers and linguists will include works by Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Chomsky, and Pinker. (Previous course in philosophy or waiver; PHIL 0180 is also strongly recommended)3 hrs lect.

PHL

Spring 2014

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LNGT 0359 - Language and Power      

Language and Power
This course is an introduction to both linguistic anthropology and political anthropology. Communication patterns are always mediated by cultural processes, social inequality, and power, so in this course we will investigate cross-cultural examples of how language, discourse, and representation relate to inequality, power, and resistance. Topics will include sociolinguistics, ethnolinguistics, gendered language practices, political discourse, and theoretical approaches to power (Marx, Foucault, and Bourdieu) (SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105 or LNGT 0102) 3hrs. lect./disc.

SOC

Fall 2013

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LNGT 0370 - German Linguistics      

German Linguistics (in German)
This course simultaneously presents an overview of the major subfields of linguistics as they apply to the German language and a discussion of how today's Standard German evolved. We will pay attention to important concepts in phonetics/phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. In addition to these theoretical and descriptive aspects, we will discuss sociolinguistic issues such as language and gender and regional variations within Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and Luxemburg. Lectures and discussions will be conducted in German. (Formerly GRMN 0340) 3 hrs. sem.

EUR LNG

Fall 2014

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LNGT 0392 - Language in Africana Studies      

Language Learning in Africana Studies: From Colonial to Global
The interdisciplinary studies of Africa and the African Diaspora intersect within the study of Africana. What role did language learning have in the development of these fields? Why is Swahili the most studied African language outside of Africa? In this course we will consider the impact of colonial linguistics on the transnational study of Africa and its Diaspora, as well as the linguistic diversity of these contexts. We will also examine the general diffusion of Swahili through Africana studies programs worldwide, from Mexico and Russia to India, the U.S., and Botswana. In discussing the place of language study in our personal explorations of Africana, we will consider the value of primary resources in the languages of Africa and its Diaspora, and critically assess the future of Africana studies. Swahili-speaking students will review supplemental primary sources in Swahili. 3 hrs. sem.

AAL CMP SOC

Fall 2013

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LNGT 0421 - Arabic Linguistic Variation      

Aspects of Arabic Linguistic Variation
In this course we will focus on aspects of Arabic linguistic variation across the Arab world. Topics will include: regional variation among major Arabic dialects in the lexicon and grammar; alternation in usage between Modern Standard Arabic and the vernacular dialects; and variation tied to literary, religious, and political discourse. Readings will consist of Arabic texts taken from a variety of sources, including print and non-print media, political speeches and commentaries, and the language of literature. This course will be taught in Arabic. (ARBC 0302 or equivalent) 3 hrs. sem.

AAL LNG SOC

Fall 2013

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LNGT 0435 - Arabic Diglossia      

Arabic Diglossia: A Linguistic Approach
Diglossia is an intricate sociolinguistic situation in which two related varieties of the same language co-exist within the same speech community. In this course we will focus on the study of diglossia as manifested in Arabic-speaking communities, where Modern Standard Arabic is used side by side with Vernacular Arabic. In particular, we will discuss the linguistic differences between the two varieties, their distinct and overlapping functions, their status in society, and code-switching between them in various contexts of language use. Course materials will be drawn from a variety of sources, including articles and book chapters, print and non-print media, political and religious discourse, and literary texts. The language of instruction is exclusively Arabic. (ARBC 0302 or equivalent) 3 hrs. sem.

AAL LNG SOC

Fall 2014

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LNGT 0459 - Language and Power Seminar      

Language and Power
This course is an introduction to both linguistic anthropology and political anthropology. Communication patterns are always mediated by cultural processes, social inequality, and power, so in this course we will investigate cross-cultural examples of how language, discourse, and representation relate to inequality, power, and resistance. Topics will include sociolinguistics, ethnolinguistics, gendered language practices, political discourse, and theoretical approaches to power (Marx, Foucault, and Bourdieu) (SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105 or LNGT 0102) 3hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)

SOC

Fall 2014

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LNGT 0500 - Independent Work      

Independent Work
(Approval Required)

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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LNGT 1001 - Intro to Translation Studies      

Introduction to Translation Studies
Combining both theory and praxis, this course is geared towards students with an advanced knowledge of modern languages who are contemplating a career in translation. During the first part of the course in the lecture/discussion format, we will analyze key concepts of translation studies such as Katharina Reiss’ and Hans Vermeer’s “skopos theory” and Lawrence Venuti’s “the translator’s invisibility.” We will also explore political and ideological influences on translation, specifically gender. Throughout the course, students will be required to translate different non-literary texts into their native languages and present their translations in class. This course counts as elective credit towards the Linguistics minor.

WTR

Winter 2011, Winter 2012, Winter 2013, Winter 2014

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LNGT 1003 - Introduction to TESOL      

Introduction to TESOL
In this course we will study theories and practices relevant to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and abroad. We will examine activities and materials that are commonly used with adolescent and adult learners, and we will practice developing curricular units and activities that can be applied to a variety of classroom settings. Class sessions are designed to be hands-on and interactive, and will include teaching demonstrations with peer feedback. Opportunities for community engagement will also be available. The final project for the course will be a teaching portfolio that includes classroom resources, observation reports, and reflections.

WTR

Winter 2011

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LNGT 1004 - 2nd Lang Acquisition & Ed Tech      

Second Language Acquisition and Educational Technology
In this course we will study the relationship between second language acquisition (SLA) theory, foreign language (FL) instruction, and the use of educational technology. We will examine various aspects of first and second language learning/acquisition. SLA theories and research findings will then provide a framework to explore FL instruction and computer assisted learning (CALL) applications. Based on an experiential project development approach, the course will offer students opportunities to critically assess existing CALL applications and to design learning materials based on SLA current and relevant research. Class sessions are designed to be hands-on and interactive. This course counts as elective credit towards the Linguistics minor.

WTR

Winter 2012

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LNGT 1009 - History of English Language      

History of the English Language
Who was the first “dude”? Is “unfriend” acceptable English? In this course we will explore the story of English as a history of language contacts and language change. We will begin the story in 449 AD with the Germanic dialect of Anglo-Saxon invaders, and end by examining global Englishes in the digital age. Along the way we will study literary and popular texts (from “Caedmon’s Hymn” to Harry Potter) representing the major English periods (Old, Middle, Early Modern, and Modern) in order to understand the changes in spelling, pronunciation, grammar, syntax, and vocabulary resulting from both internal evolution and such external, cultural factors as war, migration, global markets, music, film, television, and the internet.

LIT SOC WTR

Winter 2014

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