Martin Seehuus

Assistant Professor of Psychology

 
 work802-443-5364
 McCardell Bicentennial Hall 279

Martin Seehuus is a visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology at Middlebury College.  He joined Middlebury in the fall of 2015 after completing his clinical internship at the University of Rochester Medical Center and earning his PhD in clinical psychology from the University of Vermont.  Martin received an MA in psychology from The New School for Social Research, an MBA from the University of Pittsburgh, an MA in existential-phenomenological psychology from Duquesne University, and a BS in economics and psychology from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.

Martin’s research is primarily in sexuality, particularly focusing on the complex causes and consequences of sexual behavior, including the precursors of sexual distress and dysfunction and the clinical and social interventions that may help to resolve that distress.  Martin’s secondary line of research is in sleep, exploring the relationship between disrupted sleep and other psychological distress, such as trauma, depression, and anxiety, and in how the psychological treatment of sleep disruptions (when co-occurring with other disorders) may facilitate or even reduce the need for other psychological interventions.  Throughout all of his research, Martin is interested the nature of psychological distress as an underlying and yet largely unexplored common factor.

 

Courses

Course List: 

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

FYSE 1553 - Science is a Verb      

Science is a Verb
Science plays a vital role in the modern world but can seem abstract or distant. How do we best study? What kind of exercise is best for our health? What effect does social media have on our happiness? How do we find existing evidence we can trust, and how do we test hypotheses in our own lives? In this course we will (a) develop the science literacy skills necessary to find and apply scientific findings to learn about ourselves, others, and the world, and (b) set up and run our own micro-experiments to address how these questions apply to us. 3 hrs. sem. CW SCI

Fall 2019

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PSYC 0105 - Introduction To Psychology      

Introduction to Psychology
This course will provide a general introduction to the field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, psychological disorders, and social behavior. (Open to Juniors and Seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs lect./1 hr. disc. SOC

Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2018, Fall 2018

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PSYC 0224 - Psychological Disorders      

Psychological Disorders
What makes an individual “abnormal”? Under what circumstances do mental health professionals classify emotions, thoughts, or behaviors as “disordered”? In this course, we will explore these questions with attention to their historical, theoretical, ethical, and diagnostic implications. We will investigate various classes of disorders, like anxiety, mood, and psychotic disorders, with a focus on their causes and treatments. Throughout, we will aim to appreciate the complexities and uncertainties surrounding diagnosis, and to recognize and challenge common assumptions about psychological disorders. In addition to lecture, the course will include discussions of current and controversial topics, and occasional demonstrations, analysis of clinical case material, and/or role plays. (PSYC 0105; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SOC

Fall 2015, Spring 2017, Spring 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019

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PSYC 0307 / GSFS 0307 - Human Sexuality      

Human Sexuality
In this course we will discuss the biological, psychological, behavioral, and cultural aspects of human sexuality, starting with a review of anatomy, physiology and function. We will use current research findings to inform discussions of topics such as arousal and desire, relationships, sexual orientation, consent, pornography, and compulsive sexual behavior. We will look at how issues like contraception, sexuality, and sexually transmitted diseases have influenced and been influenced by their cultural context. (Two psychology courses; not open to first year students; open to Psychology and GSFS majors) 3 hrs. lect.

Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Fall 2017, Fall 2018

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PSYC 0350 - Directed Research      

Directed Research in Psychology
Directed research provides opportunities for advanced students to become familiar with and participate in ongoing research projects under the direction of a faculty member. The student will first read background literature on the content area to be investigated and experimental methodologies to be used. Procedures involved in conducting psychological research will then be learned through firsthand experience. Potential activities include the design of research and the defining of conceptual variables and the gathering, analyzing, and interpretation of data. Finally, students will learn how to write technical articles in psychology by preparing a paper describing the project, using APA style. (Approval required; not open to first-year students) 3 hrs. lect.

Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020

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PSYC 0413 - Theories of Clinical Psych      

Approaches to Clinical Psychology: Theory and Practice
What are the major theoretical orientations of clinical psychology, and how does each view the domains of thinking, behavior, free will, psychopathology, and treatment? In this discussion-based course, we will explore cognitive behavioral, psychodynamic, behaviorist, existential, and other approaches to clinical psychology. Each has its own emphasis; some focus on symptoms, while others teach emotional tolerance or address unconscious drives. Using philosophy, theory, evidence, and case examples, we will explore similarities and differences among the major orientations and consider their consequences for researchers, therapists, and society at large. (PSYC 0224 recommended; open to junior/senior psychology majors; others by waiver.) 3 hrs. sem.

Fall 2015, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2019

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PSYC 0500 - Advanced Research      

Advanced Research
A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced students majoring in psychology. (Approval required)

Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020

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PSYC 0700 - Senior Research      

Senior Research
A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced senior majors in psychology. (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202; Approval required)

Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020

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PSYC 0701 - Senior Thesis Proposal      

Senior Thesis Proposal
Students hoping to be considered as candidates for departmental honors must enroll in PSYC 0701 under the sponsorship of a department faculty member and submit a formal, written research proposal to the department by 5 p.m. on the Wednesday during the final week of fall classes in their senior year. If the proposal is approved, the student will enroll in PSYC 0702 during the winter term and PSYC 0703 during the spring term of their senior year. (Feb graduates should consult with their advisors about the appropriate semester in which to begin a thesis.) (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202; Approval required)

Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020

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PSYC 0702 - Senior Thesis Second Semester      

Senior Thesis Second Semester
Students whose honors thesis proposal (PSYC 0701) has been approved will collect, analyze, and interpret their data. This is the second semester of the 3-semester senior thesis. (PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, and PSYC 0701; Approval required)

Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020

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PSYC 0703 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis*
This is the third and final semester of the senior thesis. Students will finish analyzing, and interpreting their data. This process culminates in a written thesis to be submitted by 4 p.m. on the Monday BEFORE the final week of spring classes, a presentation, and an oral defense. The decision about awarding departmental honors will be made after the student submits the thesis. (PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, and PSYC 0702; Approval required)

Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020

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Publications

Pigeon, W., Heffner, K., Creah, H., Gallegos, A., Walsh, P., Seehuus, M., Cerulli, C. (2015) Responding to the need for sleep amongst survivors of interpersonal violence: A Randomized control trial of a cognitive-behavioral insomnia intervention followed by PTSD treatment.  Contemporary Clinical Trials.

Yurcheshen, M., Seehuus, M., Pigeon, W. (2015). Updates on nutraceutical sleep therapeutics and investigational research. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

Clifton, J., Seehuus, M., & Rellini, A. (2015). Testing cognitive predictors of individual differences in the sexual psychophysiological responses of sexually functional women. Psychophysiology.

Seehuus, M., Clifton, J. & Rellini, A. (2014). The role of family environment and multiple forms of childhood abuse in the shaping of sexual function and satisfaction in women. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 1-14.

Parent, J., Forehand, R., Dunbar, J., Watson, K., Reising, M., Seehuus, M. & Compas, B. (2014).  Parent and adolescent reports of parenting when a parent has a history of depression: Associations with direct observations of parenting.  Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 42(2), 173-183.

Seehuus, M. & Rellini, A. (2013). Gender differences in the relationship between sexual satisfaction and propensity for risky sexual behavior. Sexual and Relationship Therapy, 28(3),229-244.

Bird, L., Seehuus, M., Clifton, J. & Rellini, A. (2013). Dissociation during sex and sexual functioning in women with and without a history of childhood sexual abuse.  Archives of Sexual Behavior, 1-12.

Leiblum, S. R., & Seehuus, M. (2008). FSFI scores of women with Persistent Genital Arousal Disorder compared with published scores of women with Female Sexual Arousal Disorder and healthy controls. Journal of Sexual Medicine, 6, 469-473.

Leiblum, S. R., Schnall, E., Seehuus, M., & DeMaria, A. (2008). To BATHE or not to BATHE: Patient satisfaction with visits to their family physician. Family Medicine, 40, 407 - 411.

Leiblum, S., Seehuus, M., Goldmeier, D., & Brown, C. (2007). Psychological, medical, and pharmacological correlates of Persistent Genital Arousal Disorder. Journal of Sexual Medicine, 4, 1358-1366.

Leiblum, S., Seehuus, M., & Brown, C. (2007). Persistent Genital Arousal: Disordered or normative aspect of female sexual response? Journal of Sexual Medicine, 4, 680-687; discussion 687-689.

Department of Psychology

McCardell Bicentennial Hall
276 Bicentennial Way
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753