Middlebury Language School Graduate Programs

 

N.B. Course descriptions and required texts are subject to change.

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

ARBC 6508 - Contemp Arab Literature      

Contemporary Arab Literature (Graduate Level)

This course is designed for very advanced students who have completed at least four years of Arabic. It is especially suited to graduate students, junior scholars, and those whose primary teaching and research are conducted in Arabic. Students explore various aspects of contemporary Arab societies including art, literature, media, and culture. They study classical and modern poetry, short stories, novels, and contemporary political discourses. Students in this course have regular and frequent opportunities to expand their vocabulary in a broad range of debates and discussions surrounding these disciplines, and in the context of the Middlebury College's Arabic-only environment. Classes feature daily discussions as well as meetings with visiting scholars that work together to provide unparalleled exposure to high level Arabic. In addition, students review grammar and hone their writing skills by completing short daily essays, papers and final research projects. (2 units)

Summer 2011

More Information »

ARBC 6605 - Intro to Arabic Linguistics      

Introduction to Arabic Linguistics

The course provides students with the fundamental theories and linguistic concepts as well presents an overview of the most important issues in theoretical linguistics in the Arabic tradition. The historical development of Arabic, dialect variation, the phenomenon of “diglossia” and the “level” of language use are among the topics to be explored in this course. Through lecture, presentations and discussion, students will gain knowledge about the language system and Arabic morphology, phonology and syntax.

Linguistics

Summer 2012, Summer 2013

More Information »

ARBC 6608 - Arabic Sociolinguistics      

Arabic Sociolinguistics introduces you to key issues in the study of language variation in the Arab world. You will learn the theoretical and analytical tools needed to evaluate and understand current issues in Arabic sociolinguistics, and be prepared to undertake original research. You gain first-hand experience of data collection and training in methods of analysis. We will attempt to relate the issues to the contexts of language learning and teaching.

Required Text:

Arabic Sociolinguistics. Bassiouney, Reem. Georgetown University Press, 2009.

Linguistics

Summer 2014 Language Schools

More Information »

ARBC 6610 - Modern Arabic Literature      

The course introduces students to modern tradition of Arabic literature in its various forms: poetry, prose, fiction, drama and criticism. Students enrolled in this course will explore the emergence of literary movements, the influence of Western ideas and the dominance of specific literary forms notably the novel, short story and drama. A wide range of Arabic literary works and texts that have been produced in the nineteenth and twenties centuries will be discussed and analyzed. These works will represent and reflect the different pace of literary development in the Arab world, including North Africa.

Literature

Summer 2012

More Information »

ARBC 6611 - Literary Communication      

Literary Communication in the Arab Islamic Civilization

This course studies the various modes of communication and dialogue between civilizations through literature in all its shades and patterns. It also aims to unravel literary patterns as literature has always been a pillar of civilization. Moreover, it deals with the link between the luminosity of literature in any civilization and the might and power that such a civilization possesses. To convey such ideas across, it draws from history, particularly instances of coexistence between civilizations and nations with a view to introducing a renewed vision or a future strategy for the role of literature in the dialogue of civilizations.

Literature

Summer 2014 Language Schools

More Information »

ARBC 6612 - Abbasid Literature      

This course will explore the early Abbasid era (750 to 950) through the biographies of representative figures, including the caliphs al-Rashid, al-Amin, and al-Ma’mun; the jurists Abu Yusuf, al-Shafiʿi, and Ibn Hanbal; the ascetics Bishr al-Hafi and Maʿruf al-Karkhi; the physician Jibril ibn Bakhtishu; the translator Hunayn ibn Ishaq; the poets Abu Nuwas and Abu al-Atahiyah; the language-scholar al-Asmaʿī; and the singers Ibrahim al-Mawsili and Arib al-Ma’muniyyah. We will explore the different discourses—historiographic, religious, and literary—that emerged in this period and look at the ways in which they complemented or criticized one another. We will also look at the image of this period in modern Arabic historiography and the contemporary mass media.

Literature

Summer 2013

More Information »

ARBC 6615 - Narrating Modernity      

This course will explore the nahdah or Arabic cultural renaissance of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by studying the new forms of storytelling and self-representation that became available to writers during this period. We will begin by sampling some of the writings of the so-called age of decline that is supposed to have preceded the nahdah. We will then read, entirely or in part, the memoirs of such figures as Jurji Zaydan, Huda Sharawi, and Ahmad Faris al-Shidyaq, as well as historical novels, narrative poetry, and European literature in translation, in search of what makes these genres distinctively modern. The course will also consider the ways in which the modernist narrative has inspired various attempts to “modernize,” “purify,” or “defend” the Arabic language itself.

Literature

Summer 2013

More Information »

ARBC 6618 - Women in Classical Arabic Lit      

Women in Classical Arabic Literature

This course studies the traditional literary concepts on women and beauty in the Arab and Islamic Civilization. In many parts of the Arab and Islamic worlds today, people are not aware of the rich literary and linguistic heritage that exists on such issues although for centuries Arab and Muslim scholars have written numerous manuscripts about such aspects. Moreover, other literary manifestations exist on the subject such as poetry, prose, novels that need to be examined and studied by contemporary Arab and non-Arab students of Arabic.

Literature

Summer 2014 Language Schools

More Information »

ARBC 6620 - History of the Arabic Language      

This course will focus on the development of the Arabic language from its origins to the present. Both internal and external history will be considered so that students acquire a firm grounding in the linguistic evolution of the language, coupled with an understanding of its development in relation to a range of social and cultural phenomena. Particular attention will be paid to aspects of Arabic linguistic variation across the Arab-speaking world, and regional variation among major Arabic dialects in the lexicon and grammar. Readings will consist of Arabic texts taken from a variety of sources, including print and non-print.

Required Texts:

The Arabic Language. Versteegh, Kees. Edinburgh University Press, 1997.

Modern Arabic, Revised Edition: Modern Arabic: Structures, Functions, and Varieties. Holes, Clive. Georgetown University Press, 2004.

Linguistics

Summer 2014 Language Schools

More Information »

ARBC 6670 - Contemporary Arab Society      

Aspects of Contemporary Arab Society

This is an introduction to modern Arab society focusing on Arab Renaissance Era (Nahdah). This period witnessed the struggle for independence for many Arab states and their ties with Europe and other neighboring countries. It was also the time during which several cultural and religious movements emerged and many scholarly works were developed and produced. Students explore diversified works through which they understand the special relevance of earlier periods to contemporary Middle East and Arab social, cultural and aesthetic issues. These works will include history, art, media, and popular cultures. The course also addresses issues related to the current changes in the Middle East and the political and socioeconomic impact of Arab Spring on the future of the region.

Civ Cul & Soc

Summer 2012

More Information »

ARBC 6690 - Teaching Arabic as a FL      

Current Issues in Teaching Arabic as a Foreign Language

The course provides an overview of the history of teaching Arabic as a second/foreign language and the current approaches adopted in Arabic language programs and classrooms. Students will be acquainted with a variety of methods, techniques and activities for teaching the four skills, grammar, vocabulary and culture. Training also includes the use of textbooks, preparation of materials as well as learner strategies. Arabic specific issues such as the use of dialect and the place of media Arabic in the curriculum will be explored.

Pedagogy

Summer 2012

More Information »

ARBC 6691 - Teaching Arbc for Proficiency      

New findings of second language acquisition research have implications for teaching methodologies which are in turn reflected in how professional organizations set the goals and parameters for learning a foreign language. The new guidelines for Arabic, developed by the American Council for Teaching Foreign Languages in 2012, define such parameters for Arabic as a foreign language. This course offers a practicum where students explore these guidelines in depth and investigate their translation into actual lessons and teaching tools with the goal of ensuring that all teaching and learning activities enable the learner's to become proficient in Arabic.

Pedagogy

Summer 2013, Summer 2014 Language Schools

More Information »

ARBC 6692 - Teaching Methodology      

This course provides students with an understanding of basic principles of second/foreign-language acquisition and the theoretical underpinnings of commonly used language teaching methods. Additionally, students receive in-service training in teaching, in creating and adapting instructional materials, and in designing tests as well. Each week, the four daily meetings consist of lecture/discussions and a one hour practicum.

Required Texts:

Communicative Language Teaching in Action: Putting Principles to Work. Brandl, Klaus. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2008.

Teaching and Learning Arabic as a Foreign Language: A Guide for Teachers. Ryding, Karen. Georgetown University Press, 2013.

Pedagogy

Summer 2014 Language Schools

More Information »

ARBC 6693 - Grammatical Theory & Pedagogy      

Arabic Grammatical Theory & Pedagogy

This course will examine Arabic grammatical tradition and the analytical methods of medieval and contemporary Arab grammarians. Besides the study of the development of Arabic grammatical theory, the course will help students understand the fundamentals of Arabic grammar and provide methods and innovative techniques in teaching Arabic grammatical structures through a series of workshops, class observations, and microteaching sessions.

Language & Stylistics Pedagogy

Summer 2012

More Information »

ARBC 6695 - Materials Development in TAFL      

This course is a practicum on materials development for teaching Arabic as a foreign language. It integrates the general concepts, principles, and practical considerations in the design, development and delivery of teaching materials both for a general audience and for Arabic for special purposes. Class activities will also focus on Arabic teaching materials that are developed to be teacher-centered and those that are designed to be students-centered including online courses. Students are required to develop and test their own materials.

Pedagogy

Summer 2013

More Information »

ARBC 6698 - Language Practicum      

This is a one unit course which is designed to give graduate students an opportunity to reflect on Arabic pedagogical theories and become familiar with a range of teaching strategies and techniques. The course includes class observation, lesson planning, a micro-teaching component and actual teaching demonstrations of the language skills. Students are required to conduct interviews with professional instructors during which they discuss the best practices as well as problems encountered in teaching the beginning, intermediate and advanced college level Arabic classes. To address the linguistic phenomenon of diglossia, students will practice teaching Arab dialect(s) alongside the formal varieties of the language. The course is offer in the last summer session towards the completion of the Master’s degree.

Summer 2013

More Information »