Jeri Johnson

Jeri Johnson, Head Tutor. BA, Brigham Young University; MA, MPhil, University of Oxford. Peter Thompson Fellow in English, Exeter College; Professor of English, University of Oxford

Stephen Berenson

Stephen Berenson, BFA, Drake University. Founding Director of Brown/Trinity MFA Programs in Acting and Directing; Professor of the Practice, Brown University; Resident Acting Company Member, Trinity Repertory Company.

Stephen Berenson is Founding Director of the Brown University/Trinity Rep MFA Programs in Acting and Directing. As Professor of the Practice at Brown, his major areas of instruction are Shakespeare, Chekhov, Moliere, and contemporary dramatic texts. A member of the Resident Acting Company at Trinity Rep for 30 years, his roles have included Willy Loman, Shylock, Feste, Puck, Fagin, Grendel, and Scrooge. Recognition includes the New England Theatre Conference Teacher of the Year Award, the Providence Mayor Citation for Excellence, and a Lunt-Fontanne Fellowship at Ten Chimneys. A long-time member of the Bread Loaf Acting Ensemble in Vermont, this will be his fourth consecutive summer on the faculty at Lincoln College.

Caroline Bicks

Caroline Bicks, BA, Harvard University; MA, PhD, Stanford University. Professor of English and Stephen E. King Chair in Literature, University of Maine

Caroline Bicks is Stephen E. King Chair in Literature at the University of Maine. She specializes in Shakespeare, gender studies, and the history of science. She is the author of Midwiving Subjects in Shakespeare’s England, co-editor of The History of British Women’s Writing, 1500-1610; and co-author of the irreverent Shakespeare, Not Stirred: Cocktails for Your Everyday Dramas. Her creative non-fiction has appeared in the Modern Love column of the New York Times, on NPR’s “All Things Considered” and McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, and in the show and book Afterbirth: Stories You Won’t Read in a Parenting Magazine. For more, go to: www.everydayshakespeare.com

Christine Gerrard

Christine Gerrard, BA, DPhil, University of Oxford; MA, University of Pennsylvania. Barbara Scott Fellow and Tutor in English, Lady Margaret Hall; Professor of English, University of Oxford

Christine Gerrard is the Barbara Scott Fellow in English at Lady Margaret Hall and a Professor in English Literature at the English Faculty at Oxford. She is also the Tutor for US Visiting Students at her college. Her research interests include the long eighteenth-century, with a special focus on political writing and women’s poetry, and on Transatlantic literature of the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. She is currently editing a volume of the political writings of Jonathan Swift, and the eighteenth-century volume for the Oxford History of Poetry in English. In 2017 she will be taking up a Mellon Foundation Fellowship at the Ashmolean Museum, designing a project involving classical antiquities aimed at making the eighteenth-century and Romantic preoccupation with the Classical past accessible to a wider audience. 

Conrad James

Conrad James, BA, University of the West Indies, Mona; PhD, University of Cambridge. Associate Professor of World Literatures and Cultures, University of Houston

Conrad James is Associate professor of World Literatures and Cultures at the University of Houston. He received his PhD in Latin American literature from the University of Cambridge and has taught at the University of Durham and the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom. He has also held visiting positions at the University of Maryland and the University of California, Santa Cruz. Dr James is author of Filial Crisis and Erotic Politics in Black Cuban Writing Daughters Sons and Lovers (Tamesis 2019). His other publications include Writing the Afro-Hispanic: Essays on Africa and Africans in the Spanish Caribbean (2012) and The Cultures of the Hispanic Caribbean (2000).

Cora Kaplan

Cora Kaplan, BA, Smith College. Honorary Professor of English, Queen Mary, University of London; Professor Emerita of English, Southampton University

Cora Kaplan is Honorary Professor of English at Queen Mary, University of London, and Emerita Professor of English at Southampton University. Her work has a double focus: on race and class across genres in the long nineteenth-century, and on fiction, film and memoir of the last half-century. A General Editor of the ten volume Palgrave Macmillan History of British Women’s Writing (2010-2017) her books include Sea Changes; Essays on Culture and Criticism (1986), and Victoriana: Histories, Fictions, Criticism (2007). With Jenny Bourne Taylor she edited a Special issue “Reading Life Writing” (New Formations, 67). A short memoir of her own, ‘Red Diaper Baby,’ appeared in History Workshop Journal, no. 83, Spring 2017.

Francis Leneghan

Francis Leneghan, BA, PhD, Trinity College, Dublin. Associate Professor of Old English, University of Oxford; Fellow, St. Cross College

Francis Leneghan is Associate Professor of Old English at the University of Oxford, Fellow of St Cross College, and lecturer in Medieval English at St Peter’s and Exeter colleges. Before coming to Oxford in 2008, he taught at Trinity College Dublin and University College Dublin. His research is focused on the literature of Anglo-Saxon England. He is especially interested in the Old English heroic poem Beowulf, the translation and adaptation of scripture in early England, and writings associated with King Alfred of Wessex. He is the author of The Dynastic Drama of Beowulf, Anglo-Saxon Studies 39 (Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 2020) as well as numerous articles and essays on Old English poetry and prose, and co-editor of The Psalms and Medieval English Literature: From the Conversion to the Reformation (Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 2017 and The Psalms in Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman Englandspecial issue of English Studies 98.1 (2017). He is a co-organiser of the Oxford Psalms Network and Oxford Medieval Studies. For further details, please see my faculty page.

David Russell

David Russell, BA, University of Oxford; PhD, Princeton University. Associate Professor of English, University of Oxford; Tutor and Fellow, Corpus Christi College

David Russell is Associate Professor of English at Oxford University, and a fellow of Corpus Christi College; before coming to Oxford her was a lecturer at King’s College London, and was a member of the Columbia Society of Fellows and the Mahindra Center for the Humanities at Harvard. He obtained his PhD from Princeton University. 

David is the author of Tact: Aesthetic Liberalism and the Essay form in Nineteenth-Century Britain (2018) and is currently working on cultural criticism and ‘sage’ writing. He is interested in a range of literary, cultural, queer and psychoanalytic theory. 

Mark Turner, BA, Hampden-Sydney College; MA, PhD, University of London. Professor of English, King’s College London

Froma Zeitlin

Froma Zeitlin, BA, Radcliffe College; MA, Catholic University of America; PhD, Columbia University. Charles Ewing Professor of Greek Language and Literature, Professor of Comparative Literature, Emerita, Princeton University

Froma Zeitlin is Ewing Professor of Greek Language and Literature and Professor of Comparative Literature at Princeton University with emeritus status.  Her interests extend from archaic and classical Greek texts (epic, drama) to the study of ancient prose fiction and other works of Greek literature under the Roman Empire.  In Comparative Literature, her specialty is Holocaust studies. Her books include Under the Sign of the Shield: Semiotics and Aeschylus’ Seven Against Thebes (1982; 2d ed. 2009), Playing the Other: Gender and Society in Classical Greek Literature (1996), and two co-edited volumes, both published in 1990, Nothing to Do with Dionysos?: Athenian Drama in its Social Context ; and Before Sexuality: Structures of Erotic Experience in the Ancient Greek World, and Mortals and Immortals: Selected Essays of Jean-Pierre Vernant (1991) along with numerous essays.  She has a special interest in relations between word and image as well as in gender and sexuality studies. Froma Zeitlin is Ewing Professor of Greek Language and Literature and Professor of Comparative Literature at Princeton University with emeritus status.  Her interests extend from archaic and classical Greek texts (epic, drama) to the study of ancient prose fiction and other works of Greek literature under the Roman Empire.  In Comparative Literature, her specialty is Holocaust studies. Her books include Under the Sign of the Shield: Semiotics and Aeschylus’ Seven Against Thebes (1982; 2d ed. 2009), Playing the Other: Gender and Society in Classical Greek Literature (1996), and two co-edited volumes, both published in 1990, Nothing to Do with Dionysos?: Athenian Drama in its Social Context ; and Before Sexuality: Structures of Erotic Experience in the Ancient Greek World, and Mortals and Immortals: Selected Essays of Jean-Pierre Vernant (1991), along with numerous essays.  She has a special interest in relations between word and image as well as in gender and sexuality studies.