Middlebury

 

May 2014: Recent Faculty Accomplishments

Will Amidon (Geology) has received funding from the Scottish University Environmental Research Center as part of a collaborative research project on the paleo-seismic history of the Hat Creek Graben in the northern Sierra Nevada mountains of California.  The overall project is funded by Pacific Gas & Electric in order to better understand earthquake and other hazards related to their dams and other infrastructure in the area.  At least 4 undergraduates will be involved in this research.
 
Will has also been awarded a fellowship from the Marion and Jasper Whiting Foundation for a project titled Rediscovering Geochronology. The grant will enable Will to spend four months during his 2014-15 leave in Lorraine, France at the Centre de Recherches Petrographiques and Geochemiques fulfilling personal and professional goals related to doing geochronological research and incorporating new techniques into project-based based learning at Middlebury.     
Glenn Andres (History of Art and Architecture) and his co-author Curtis Johnson have been awarded the 2014 Vermont Preservation Award from the Preservation Trust of Vermont for Buildings of Vermont (Buildings of the United States), their new book.  The awarded was given at the Vermont State Preservation Conference in Island Pond, Vermont recently.
 
Febe Armanios (History) has been awarded a Fellowship from the Gerda Henkel Foundation (Germany) in support of her research this summer in Turkey, Cyprus and Lebanon. The research relates to her 2014-15 leave and to her new book project, titled Satellite Ministries: The Rise of Christian Television in the Middle East. The project investigates the rise of Christian broadcasting in the region, from its American evangelical roots in the early 1980s to its more indigenous representations today.
 
Timothy Billings (English & American Literatures, Comparative Literature Program) has been awarded an Enduring Questions grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to support the development of a new course on the topic of “What is lost (& found) in translation?” Students will explore the fundamental philosophical, sociological, and linguistic questions raised by translingual communication such as: How much does language determine how we think? How much of language is culture? What is unique to translating sacred texts, poetry, “exotic” languages, and dead languages? Is anything “untranslatable”? Are translators traitors, drudges, or artists? Can machines translate? Students will survey the history of theoretical writing on translation while comparing multiple translations of coherent sections from major works such as the Bible, Greek & Latin poetry, Tao Te Ching, and One Thousand and One Nights among others.  The course will be offered twice during the next two years.
 
Erik Bleich (Political Science) has been awarded a Fulbright Scholar Program research grant and a fellowship through the European Institutes for Advanced Study (EURIAS) at the Collegium de Lyon (France) in support of his 2014-15 leave project titled, Restricting Racist Speech in France: How Courts Draw the Line Between Free Speech and Hate Speech. He will work on a book examining how French courts distinguish between forms of racist speech that are protected and prohibited in this thorny area for liberal democracies. His fellowship in Lyon provides support and a home base for 10 months as he pursues this research. For the Fulbright, he will be affiliated with the Institute of Political Studies (Sciences Po) in Paris.
 
Jule Emerson (Theatre) In February, the Theatre department presented Pentecost to rave reviews at Kennedy Center's American College Theatre Festival in Hyannis, MA. Three students from Jule Emerson’s Costume Design I class presented their design work from that class at the festival. All three were honored at the award ceremony: Krista Duke '15 won the Regional Award in Costume Design,1st Place; Cordelia Prouvost '17 received Honorable Mention (2nd place); and Anne MacPherson '16 received the Focal press/Rafael Jean Showcase Award for Excellence in Theatre Design.
 
Laurie Essig (Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies) has been awarded a fellowship from the Marion and Jasper Whiting Foundation for a project titled “Bury Their Hearts”:  The Homosexual as foreign Pollution in Russia.  The grant will fund a trip to Moscow and St. Petersburg, during which Laurie will meet with colleagues, experts and LGBT and feminist activists to further explore how the figure of the homosexual is being utilized in nationalist politics and rhetoric as a sign of foreign pollution and disease.  This trip will also  provide Laurie with the opportunity reacquaint herself with “all things Russian” including Russian academic culture, in an effort to prepare for doing research in Russia in the future and being able to update her work on sexual citizenship in Russia in order to expand her teaching to include global sexualities.     
 
Anne Knowles (Geography) has learned that her book Mastering Iron has won the J. B. Jackson Prize from the Association of American Geographers. As announced by the AAG: “The Jackson Prize was established to encourage and reward American geographers who write books about the United States which convey the insights of professional geography in language that is interesting and attractive to a lay audience.”

Michael Kraus (Political Science and Russian & East European Studies) reports seven publications in 2013. His essay on the “Institute for the Study of Totalitarian Regimes and Security Services Archive,” appeared in Lavinia Stan and Nadya Nedelsky, eds, Encyclopedia of Transitional Justice (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013), vol. 3, pp. 195-200. Other articles include:  (“On the Origins and the Activities of a Czech Institution of Memory”) in Paměť a dějiny

(“Memory and History”—Prague) VII (2) (Spring 2013), 129-133

“Obama podruhé,” (“Obama, the Second Time”), Lidové noviny—Orientace, February 2, 2013, pp. 25-26

His four op-ed pieces (in Czech) include:
"Kdyz loajalita k instituci zavazuje” (“When Institutional Loyalty Creates Commitments,” Denik Referendum (Prague), May 7, 2013.

“Americane si budou muset na utoky doma zvyknout,” (“Americans Will Have to Get Used to Attacks at Home”), Hospodarske noviny (Prague), April 17, 2013.

"Malo nebo hodne? O rozpoctu USTR“ (A Lot or a Little: On the Budget of the Institute for the Study of Totalitarian Regimes,”) Lidove noviny, February 2, 2013.

“Prima volba se osvedcila,” (“Direct Presidential Election Proved Itself”) Hospodarske noviny, January 28, 2013.

Andrew Massey (Music) This past September, the Vermont Symphony toured 9 locations around the state presenting their annual "Made in Vermont" series. Each year, these concerts feature a new composition commissioned by the orchestra. Andrew was the commissioned composer this year, having received the commission early in 2012, and delivering the score and parts of his Toccata, Chaconne, and Fugue in July. The work was conducted by Music Director Jaime Laredo, and they have now published the recording online at http://www.instantencore.com/music/details.aspx?PId=5106693
 
During the summer of 2012, Andrew was the conductor of the Vermont Symphony for their summer tour of the state, and during those concerts he directed another composition he wrote for the orchestra, entitled "Summer Snooze."
 
Elizabeth Morrison (Religion)  has been awarded a fellowship from the Marion and Jasper Whiting Foundation for a project titled In the Company of Pilgrims:  The “Four Great Places” of the Life of the Buddha. The grant will enable Elizabeth to travel to northern India and Nepal to visit sites significant in the life of the Buddha and the history of the Indian Buddhist tradition. The goal of this project is to deepen her understanding of the early Indian Buddhist tradition while observing and experiencing the phenomenon of contemporary global Buddhist pilgrimage. The experience will enhance the full range of the classes she teaches in Asian religions.     
 
Clarissa Parker (Psychology & Neuroscience) has received a 2013 NARSAD (National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression/Brain) Young Investigator Grant from the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation that wholly funds her project titled Genome-Wide Association for Conditioned Fear in the Diversity Outbred Mouse Population. The grant provides materials and supplies for two years of research into genetic influences on fear in mice, which may have implications for anxiety disorders in humans.
 
Will Pyle (Economics) had the following articles published:
“The composition and interests of business lobbies: testing Olson’s hypothesis of the ‘encompassing organization’,” with L. Solanko, Public Choice, April 2013, 19-41.

“Deposit insurance, banking crises and market discipline: evidence from a natural experiment on deposit flows and rates,” with A. Karas and K. Schoors, Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, February 2013, 179-200.

 
Burke Rochford (Religion) has published:
“Sociological Reflections on the History and Development of the Hare Krishna Movement,” in Graham Dwyer and Richard Cole (eds), Hare Krishna in the Modern World, London: Arktos.

“Guru Authority, Religious Innovation, and the Decline of New Vrindaban,” (with Henry Doktorski) in Ann Gleig and Lola Williamson (eds), Homegrown Gurus: From Hinduism in America to American Hinduism, Albany: SUNY Press.  

“The Changing Faces of God: The Hinduisation of the Hare Krishna Movement,” in Eileen Barker (ed), Revisionism and Diversification in New Religious Movements, Surrey, UK: Ashgate.

Michael Sheridan (Sociology-Anthropology) has received a “project grant” from Dumbarton Oaks to support his research project titled, “Ethnobotany, symbolism, and property rights institutions in tropical agrarian societies.”  The grant will support his ongoing research on botanically similar plants that delineate property lines, mark graves, and symbolize peace throughout tropical Africa, the Caribbean and Oceania.  During his 14-15 leave, he will revisit St. Vincent, Cameroon, and Tanzania for ethnographic fieldwork on these plants and expand the project to Polynesia. ‘Boundary plants’ remain meaningful despite social and ecological change because they embed both property rights and social values into landscapes. The resulting work will describe the symbolic, social, and ecological commonalities of these plants in agrarian societies, and explore how these focal points of property, identity, and meaning shape tropical landscapes.
 
Paul Sommers (Economics) reports he has had several papers published, some of them with former students. His paper "Who was the z-Best Olympian in 2008 and 2012?" co-authored with seniors Ian MacKay and Jack Markusen is the lead article in the current issue of the Journal of Student Research.

MacKay, Ian D., Jack W. Markusen, and Paul M. Sommers, "Who was z-Best Olympian in 2008 and 2012?"  Journal of Student Research, Vol. 3(1), 2014, pp. 1-12.
 
LoRusso,* Matthew H. and Paul M. Sommers, “BABE: The Sultan of Pitching Stats,”  Journal of Recreational Mathematics, Vol. 37(3), 2013, pp. 219-226. 

*Class of 2011, but did not graduate from Middlebury.
 
Li (’11), Jay and Paul M. Sommers, “A Study of High-Tech Swimsuits in College Competition,”  Journal of Recreational Mathematics, Vol. 37(3), 2013, pp. 227-234.
 
Fox (’12), Alexandra A., Tucker P. Donahoe (’12), John M. Yanchek (’12), and Paul M. Sommers,  “Is There a Road-Ice Advantage in NHL Shootouts?”   Journal of Recreational Mathematics, Vol. 37(3), 2013, pp. 235-237.
 
Sommers, Paul M., “Abram LeGallez: World War II Cover Artist,” First Days, April 2014, Vol. 59, No. 2, pp. 20-26
 
Sommers, Paul M., “An Unlisted Staehle Dual Cover,” First Days, June 2013, Vol. 58, No. 4, pp. 41-42.  First Days is the magazine of the American First Day Cover Society.
 
Jessica Teets (Political Science) has been awarded a grant to conduct a one year outreach program in a local elementary school with a goal of promoting awareness of China and sparking an interest in learning more about China on the part of the students and teachers at the school; the program will be designed so that it can be taken over by organizations with other after-school programs.  This Outreach Grant marks the culmination of support that Jessica received through her selection in 2011 as a Public Intellectuals Program fellow of the  National Committee on US-China Relations.        
 
Frank Winkler (Emeritus Professor, Physics) has been awarded funding from the NASA-funded Space Telescope Science Institute for a his role in a collaborative research project led by researchers from the Johns Hopkins University.   This project, involving new observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, is titled, “Discovering and Characterizing the Young Supernova Remnant Population in M101.”  The team will use the new data, archival Hubble images, and data from other space- and ground-based observatories to better understand the types of stars and general environment that lead to stellar explosions known as supernovae. 

October 2013: Recent Faculty Accomplishments

Middlebury College was recently awarded a grant from the Enduring Questions program of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), which will enable development and implementation of a sophomore-level course focused on the enduring question “What is the good life and how do I live it?“  The grant leadership team consists of Patricia Zupan (Italian), Brett Millier (English and American Literatures), Deborah Evans (American Studies), and Jonathan Miller-Lane (Education Studies).  Campus-wide discussion about the sophomore-year experience contributed to the evolution of this project; the new Commons-based course will be taught at least twice during each of the next three years by the four project leaders as well as by other faculty who will participate in developing the common syllabus.  A testament to the efforts of the project leaders is the fact that NEH has posted a copy of Middlebury’s proposal on the Enduring Questions website as one of the samples that this year’s applicants may want to consult.     
http://www.neh.gov/files/grants/middlebury_college_course_on_what_is_the...
 
Jason Arndt (Psychology) was awarded funding through the National Science Foundation’s Research Opportunity Award program to enable him to spend part of his 2012-13 leave collaborating with a colleague at the Georgia Institute of Technology examining associative memory processes using Electroencephalography (EEG).   Their research project is titled “The influence of attention on associative memory in the young and old.”       
 
Leticia Arroyo Abad (Economics & IPE) was awarded the Franklin Research Grant by the American Philosophical Society and the Arthur H. Cole Grant by the Economic History Association to fund her sabbatical project, The Fiscal Roots of Latin American Inequality. Leticia will spend some time in the archives in Madrid and the spring semester 2014 as a visiting fellow at the London School of Economics.
 
James Berg (English and American Literatures) published two chapters in edited volumes recently:
“Moral Agency as Readerly Subjectivity: Shakespeare’s Parolles and the Theophrastan Character Sketch” in Shakespeare Studies vol. XL
“Wopsle’s Revenge, or Reading Hamlet as Character in Great Expectations,” in Shakespeare’s Sense of Character, part of the Studies in Performance and Early Modern Drama series, published by Ashgate.
 
Amy Briggs (Computer Science) has been awarded a research grant from the National Science Foundation supporting her work in curriculum development for high school computer science. The award will fund her 2013-14 leave, as well as her participation in the four-year collaborative project "Broadening Participation in Computer Science: AP Computer Science Principles Phase II" with colleagues at the College Board and Duke University. The goal of the project is the creation and deployment of a new AP course in Computer Science, designed to promote the interest of more students and increase the numbers of underrepresented students engaging in computer science education and pursuing computing careers.
 
Susan Burch (American Studies and Center for the Comparative Study of Race & Ethnicity) has been awarded a fellowship from the National Archives and Records Administrative Thought its 2013 Regional Residency Fellowship program for research at the National Archives regional facility at Fort Worth, Texas, in connection with her book project titled Dislocated:  Removals, Institutions and Community Lives in American History.   This is one of six fellowships funded by the Foundation for the National Archives, one fellowship at each of six regional National Archive facilities.  
 
Jeff Carpenter (Economics) recently published an article titled Overconfidence is a Social Signaling Bias, with Stephen Burks, Lorenz Goette and Aldo Rustichini.  The article appeared in the Review of Economic Studies, 80(3): 949-983 (2013).
 
Maggie Clinton (History) has been awarded a grant from the Center for Chinese Studies in Taipei, Taiwan, in support of her 13-14 leave. The grant provides roundtrip travel and support for three months at the Center in Spring 2014.  While there, she plans to conduct research and complete the manuscript for her book project, Revolutionary Nativism: Fascism and Culture in China, 1925-1937.       
 
James Calvin Davis (Religion) has been awarded a Seminar Grant from Bringing Theory to Practice, an organization working in conjunction with the Association of American Colleges & Universities to support campus initiatives that focus on engaged learning and students' civic development.  The grant will underwrite a Winter Term retreat to further develop a new Middlebury initiative called Privilege & Poverty, a curricular program on economic inequality that will serve as a laboratory for pedagogical innovation, co-curricular learning, and the broader exploration of higher education's civic mission.
The Jack Miller Center has awarded the College a grant to help with the expenses of Constitution Day events which were held at Middlebury in September.  This grant is the result of a proposal submitted by Murray Dry and Keegan Callanan (both Political Science) and will augment resources for this event available from the Department of Political Science, EIA Civic Engagement, and the Pre-Law Program. The Jack Miller Center is “dedicated to enriching education in America’s founding principles and history."  
Hang Du (Chinese) published an article in the Modern Language Journal.  Hang Du. (2013). The Development of Chinese Fluency during Study Abroad in China. The Modern Language Journal, 97, 131-143.

Eilat Glikman (Physics) has received funding from the NASA-funded Space Telescope Science Institute to continue her ongoing research related to observations made by the Hubble Space Telescope.   Titled Testing the Merger Hypothesis for Black Hole/Galaxy Co-Evolution at z-2, the main goal of this project is to image the host galaxies of rapidly growing black holes to test whether galaxy mergers provide the necessary fuel that feed the growing black holes.  

Chris McGrory Klyza (Political Science and Environmental Studies) reports that MIT Press has just published an updated and expanded edition of American Environmental Policy: Beyond Gridlock, co-authored with David Sousa.
 
James Larrabee (Chemistry & Biochemistry) has received a three-year research grant from the National Science Foundation through NSF's Research in Undergraduate Institutions activity.  This is Jim’s fifth NSF-RUI grant in his career.  This grant provides funding to enable at least six undergraduate students to participate in his research, which should lead to a better understanding of enzyme mechanisms that could help other researchers design better drugs.   The grant is titled Magnetic Circular Dichroism of Dicobalt(II) Enzymes.  Jim also co-authored three articles recently.
Daumann, L. J.; Larrabee, J. A.; Comba, P.; Schenk, G.; Gahan, L. R. “Dinuclear cobalt(II) complexes as metallo-β-lactamase mimics” Eur. J. Inorg. Chem. 2013, 2013, 3082-3089.
Daumann, L. J.; Comba, P., Larrabee, J. A.; Schenk, G.; Stranger, R.; Cavigliasso, G.; Gahan, L. R. “Synthesis, magnetic properties, and phosphoesterase activity of dinuclear cobalt(II) complexes” Inorg. Chem. 2013, 52, 2029-2043.
Daumann, L. J.; McCarthy, B. Y.; Hadler, K. S.; Murray, T. P.; Tracy, P.; Gahan, L. R.; Larrabee, J. A.; Ollis, D. L.; Schenk, G. “Promiscuity comes at a price: Catalytic versatility vs efficiency in different metal ion derivatives of the potential bioremediator GpdQ” Biochim. Biophys. Acta 2013, 1834, 424-432.
 
John Maluccio (Economics) has had three items appear recently.
1.  Yount, K.M., J.R. Behrman, J. Hoddinott, J.A. Maluccio, A. Murphy, and U. Ramakrishnan. 2013.
Trends in schooling achievement and gender schooling gaps: Twenty-five years of evidence from rural Guatemala, Population Research and Policy Review, 32(4): 495–528.
2.  Barham, T., K. Macours, and J.A. Maluccio. 2013. Boys’ cognitive skill formation and physical growth: Long-term experimental evidence on critical ages for early childhood interventions, American Economic Review: Papers and Proceedings, 103(3): 467–71.
3.  Hoddinott, J., J.R. Behrman, J.A. Maluccio, P. Melgar, A. Quisumbing, M. Ramirez-Zea, A.D. Stein, K.M. Yount, and R. Martorell. 2013. Adult consequences of growth failure in early childhood, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (published on-line 5 September 2013, forthcoming November issue).
 
Pat Manley (Geology) reported that the Geosciences Division of the Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR), at its meeting in June, won division of the year award for sustained support to faculty doing undergraduate research.
 
Jason Mittell (Film & Media Culture / American Studies) co-edited the recently published book, How to Watch Television with Ethan Thompson (New York University Press, 2013). The book includes his co-authored introduction and his essay, “Phineas & Ferb: Children’s Television.”  Jason also published two other book chapters and one article:
“The Qualities of Complexity: Vast versus Dense Seriality in Contemporary Television,” in Television Aesthetics and Style, edited by Steven Peacock and Jason Jacobs (Bloomsbury, 2013), 45-56.
“Serial Orientations: Paratexts and Contemporary Complex Television,” in (Dis)Orientation: (Dis)Orienting Media and Narrative Mazes, edited by Julia Eckel et. al. (Transcript-Verlag Press, 2013), 165-82.
“Haunted by Seriality: The Formal Uncanny of Mulholland Drive,” Cinephile 9:1 (Spring 2013), 27-32.
James Ralph (History, Dean for Faculty Development and Research) published, “Black Church Divisions and Civil Rights Activism in Chicago,” in R. Drew Smith, ed.,  From Every Mountainside: Black Churches and the Broad Terrain of Civil Rights (Albany: SUNY Press, 2013), 21-38.
 
Daniel Scharstein (Computer Science) has been awarded a grant through the National Science Foundation’s RUI mechanism for his project titled Image Matching in the Wild. The project aims to improve the way that stereo-vision and optical-flow algorithms work in the presence of common challenges such as reflective surfaces, lighting changes, imperfect calibration, and unknown acquisition conditions. The award will fund materials and supplies for three summers of research, conference travel, and research stipends for six undergraduate students.
 
Robert Schine (Religion and Classics) was elected to serve on the board of the Hermann-Cohen-Gesellschaft (Hermann Cohen Society) at its June 7th meeting in Zurich.
 
Paul Sommers (Economics) had an article he co-authored with Daniel Bent ‘13, titled  Pay and Performance in the National Hockey League, 2011-12.  It appeared in Atlantic Economic Journal.
 
Vermont Genetics Network grants for Research in the Biomedical Sciences
Middlebury College is one of the baccalaureate partner institutions participating in a major grant from the National Institutes of Health to the University of Vermont. This grant continues the Vermont Genetics Network support that has been a significant source of funding for faculty and student research in the past decade. This year, Mark Spritzer (Biology) received support for ongoing research related to adult neurogenesis (title: Effects of Social Interactions on Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Adult Male Rats). The grant provides funding for summer effort in 2013 and includes a stipend for one undergraduate student; another of his students will receive a stipend through a separate VGN grant.
 
Su Lian Tan (Music) has received support from the New York Foundation for the Arts “Artspire” program for Lotus Lives, a chamber opera that premiered as a concert at the Manhattan School of Music, NY, 2010, with a production premier here at Middlebury Oct. 2011.  Lotus Lives celebrates the lives of three generations of women, with classical, rap, and pop music within a spectacular video set.  Artspire support takes the form of fiscal sponsorship, enabling Tan and colleagues to further develop financial and production resources by supplying strategic guidance, website and clerical support.  Tan is in discussion with several venues for future performances and DVD recording, including WGBH Boston, efforts that will be a focus of her 2013-14 leave.
 
Hailed by Fanfare magazine as "a must-own for flutists and flute enthusiasts" Su Lian Tan's new CD release, Grand Theft and other Felonies (ARSIS Audio) has been garnering attention. On August 8, 2013, Su Tan performed Grand Theft Flauto by Peter Hamlin, with the composer, at the National Flute Association Convention in NOLA.  The performance, in the company of international stars of the flute, made an inspiring impact on students and teachers, too. The CD also contains works by Middlebury alumni Matthew LaRocca and Mary Montgomery Koppel. Superstar flutist Carol Wincenc performs Tan's Autumn Lute Song as a conclusion to the program of the disc. At the convention, Flute World invited Tan and Wincenc to commemorate the new release in two sessions of CD signings.
 
Martha Woodruff  (Philosophy) has been accepted to participate in the Institute for the History of Philosophy at Emory University in June 2013, to support research for her second book.  The topic of the institute, “Renewing the Ancient Quarrel:  Plato, Hegel, and Adorno,” refers to what Plato called “the quarrel between philosophy and poetry” (Republic X). Participants take part in intensive seminars while working on their own projects about the relation between philosophy and art in these three thinkers. The institute funds travel, housing, and food for all participants.  
 
Phani Wunnava (Economics) co-authored, with Albert A. Okunade, an article that was recently published in the American Journal of Economics and Sociology, titled “Do Business Executives Give More  to Their Alma  Mater?  Longitudinal Evidence from a Large University” (Okunade is a faculty member at University of Memphis).
   
Patricia Zupan (Italian) was selected to participate during summer 2013 in a faculty seminar at Transylvania University in Kentucky, funded by the University’s Bingham Program for Excellence in Teaching. The seminar, titled Twenty-first Century Liberal Education: A Contested Concept, will involve faculty from liberal arts colleges around the country. The award covers all costs of participation, including travel.
 
PTPNYC, Middlebury's affiliated professional theatre company, concluded its 27th season in NY in early August; the season (the company's most extensive) included 40 performances of the repertory of Howard Barker's THE CASTLE and the return engagement of Caryl Churchill's SERIOUS MONEY, along with six late night performances of the company's After Dark series, a 'sandbox' for young alums. The final weeks of the season played to sold-out houses.
 
Of THE CASTLE, directed by Richard Romagnoli, Ben Brantley of the New York Times wrote:
"....as directed by Richard Romagnoli, and featuring a cast that includes a daredevil Jan Maxwell, “The Castle” is hugely, disgustingly entertaining....Imagine a melding of Bertolt Brecht’s political theater of alienation, Tom Stoppard’s verbal pyrotechnics, the end-of-days debates of Shaw’s “Heartbreak House” and Monty Python’s rampant silliness, and you’ll begin to have a sense of the tone of “The Castle......Designed by Jon Craine (set), Hallie Zieselman (lighting) and Jule Emerson (costumes), this production uses minimal but picturesque means..."
 
SERIOUS MONEY was directed by Cheryl Faraone and designed by Hallie Zieselman and Mark Evancho; costume design by Jule Emerson with Middlebury student Krista Duke. Alex Draper appeared in the central roles Billy Corman and Frosby. The Times wrote in 2012: "In the Potomac Theater Project production, the over-the-top comedy remains raw and urgent, a scathing critique of capitalism that has no use for balance…..Matching elements of Restoration comedy and Brechtian theatricality with the clamor of the trading floor, this play maintains a breakneck pace......If there’s a sharper-edged evening of entertainment in Manhattan at the moment, it involves juggling knives."
 
Several Middlebury faculty won Whiting Fellowships in May to continue their scholarship:
 
John Bertolini (English and American Literatures)—Reading Classic American Dramas through Archival Videos.  The grant will enable John to spend part of his Spring 2014 leave in New York City at the Theatre on Film and Tape Archive (of the NY Public Library for the Performing Arts).   He plans to study videos of NYC/Broadway productions of classic American drama (1930-1960) for what new insights they may offer to him about these plays that he can then relay to students in the courses he teaches on American drama.  Study of these Broadway productions will also inform his ongoing scholarship on classic American drama.
 
Armelle Crouzières-Ingenthron (French) — The grant provides support for a project she will undertake during her leave next year. She plans to travel to colleges in the northeastern United States and to the American University in Paris to learn how other institutions with strong French programs teach first-year French courses to English-speaking students.   Her goal is to make an informed decision about new methods she can incorporate into the first-year French courses she teaches, to augment or replace the longstanding program called French in Action.    
 
David Dorman (Mathematics)--project titled In Pursuit of Mathematical Biology.  This grant supports David’s Spring 2014 leave.  The objective for this grant is to deepen his knowledge of mathematical biology and epidemiology, and to hone his ability to teach courses in those areas at the undergraduate level. The grant provides travel funds to enable him to attend workshops and courses and to visit Harvey Mudd College to learn how they designed and implemented their strong mathematical biology major.
 
James Fitzsimmons (Sociology/Anthropology)-- project titled Sacred Sites of the Andes and the Desert Coast.  The goal of his project is to broaden his knowledge of archaeology and visual culture in the Americas beyond Mesoamerica to Andean South America in order to meet the demand of students for expanded course content.  The grant will fund travel to three ancient pilgrimage centers in Peru and Bolivia that were used by the Inca and their predecessors in order to further develop his existing courses and to lay the groundwork for a class on the prehistory and religion of that region.
 
Rebecca Tiger (Sociology/Anthropology) – Public Sociology, Digital Media and Social Change.  Rebecca’s goal for this project is to develop training in public sociology and the digital media tools that are becoming central to the public dissemination of sociological knowledge in order to incorporate these approaches into her courses. The grant provides support for a one-month residency during the summer of 2013 at JustPublics@365, the recently established digital media and social justice center housed at The City University of New York’s Graduate Center and funded by the Ford Foundation.
 
Steve Trombulak (Biology and Environmental Studies)—Enhancing the Quality of Instruction in Conservation Biology.  The grant will enable Steve to travel to Australia to work with the key developers of “systematic conservation planning” in order to incorporate this new perspective into the conservation biology course he teaches at Middlebury. While in Australia he will visit the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, the first in the world designed using SCP principles and tools.

June 2013: Recent Faculty Accomplishments

Vickie Backus (Biology) presented two posters recently. 2012 Presented as: Students of the Fall 2012 BIOL0140 Ecology and Evolution Class. Dept. of Biology Middlebury College. Effect of Increased Stream Flow from Hurricane Sandy on Stream Invertebrates. Vermont Monitoring Cooperative Annual Meeting. Burlington VT. 2012 Backus, V.L., A. Nurok and R.M. Landis. Resilience in Stream E,P,T following TS Irene. Vermont Monitoring Cooperative Annual Meeting. Burlington VT

James Berg (English & American Literatures) has had two publications appear recently. “Moral Agency as Readerly Subjectivity: Shakespeare’s Parolles and the Theophrastan Character Sketch” in Shakespeare Studies, Vol. XL“Shakespeare’s Sense of Character: On the Page and From the Stage,” in Studies and Performance and Early Modern Drama.

Erik Bleich (Political Science) had a publication appear recently.  It was co-authored with Francesca Lambert, class of 2011.5. “Why Are Racist Associations Free in Some States and Banned in Others? Evidence from 10 Liberal Democracies,” in West European Politics, Volume 26, Issue 1, 2013.

Susan Burch (American Studies and Center for the Comparative Study of Race & Ethnicity) has been awarded a Summer Stipend grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities in support of her book project entitled, Dislocated: Removals, Institutions, and Community Lives in American History. Burch's work centers on "dislocated histories" from South Dakota's Canton Asylum, the only federal psychiatric hospital for American Indians. Individual histories of inmates and their families are inextricably tied to broader stories of forced removals; the rise of penal, medical, and disability institutions; eugenics; and contests over citizenship and American identity in the last 200 years. 

Alison Byerly (College Professor) has had a book published. Are We There Yet? Virtual Travel and Victorian Realism has been published by the University of Michigan Press. http://www.press.umich.edu/2333731/are_we_there_yet

Jeff Carpenter (Economics) had two articles appear recently. Risk Attitudes and Well-being in Latin America, with Juan Camilo Cardenas, the Journal of Development Economics, 103(2): 52-61 (2013). and

Self Selection and Variations in the Laboratory Measurement of Other-Regarding Preferences across Subject Pools: Evidence from one college student and two adult samples, with Jon Anderson, Stephen Burks, Lorenz Goette, Karsten Maurer, Daniele Nosenzo, Ruth Potter, Kim Rocha and Aldo Rustichini, Experimental Economics, 16(2): 170-189, (2013).

Svea Closser (Sociology and Anthropology) and a colleague from Oregon State University have been awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation for a project titled “Health volunteers in rural Ethiopia:  Discourses and experiences of status, motivation, and wellbeing.”  Svea’s portion of this grant was awarded through NSF’s Research in Undergraduate Institutions (RUI) activity, and she plans to involve 6-10 undergraduates in this research, four of whom will participate in fieldwork in Ethiopia. This project will explore the complex issues surrounding the use of low-paid and volunteer labor to deliver health interventions in rural Ethiopia.

Molly Costanza-Robinson (Environmental Studies, Chemistry) has had two articles published recently. Costanza-Robinson, M. S., Carlson, T. D., Brusseau, M. L. Vapor-phase transport of trichloroethene in an intermediate-scale vadose-zone system: Retention processes and partitioning-tracer-based prediction. Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 2013, 145, 82-89, doi: 10.1016/j.jconhyd.2012.12.004.  Costanza-Robinson, M. S., Zheng, Z., Henry, E. J., Estabrook, B. D., Littlefield, M. H. Implications of surfactant-induced flow for miscible-displacement estimation of air-water interfacial areas in unsaturated porous media, Environmental Science and Technology 2012, 46, 11206-11212, doi: 10.1021/es303003v.

Matthew Dickerson (Computer Science) has received a Supplement to his grant from the National Science Foundation that funds a project titled, Teaching Computational Thinking through Multi-Agent Simulation. The additional funding will enable him to continue work on the project this summer, with special focus on dissemination of the course that he’s been developing and working on evaluation and assessment components of the original project.

John Emerson (Mathematics) authored an article titled, Emerson, J. D. 2012. “The College Sports Project: What Have We Learned?” In JSM Proceedings, Statistics in Sports Section. Alexandria, VA: American Statistical Association. 15 pp. John presented the paper at the 2012 Joint Statistical Meetings in San Diego. He also chaired a paper session at the meetings entitled, Methodology for Application in Sports.

Huda Fakhreddine (Arabic) has been awarded a fellowship from the National Endowment of the Humanities in support of her 2013-2014 leave for a project titled, A Study of Classic Arabic Poetry through the Lens of Metapoesis (Modern Critical Theory). The goal of this book project is to expand the study of metapoesis from the study of modern poetry in the twentieth century to using a “comparative modernism” approach to studying Arabic literature of the 8th and 9th century. Not only does this approach emphasize the critical and poetic consciousness central to the poetry of that period, it also offers a new perspective on the relationship of the Abbasid modernists to their successors: the modernists of the twentieth century. This will be the only work in the field that treats both classical and modern Arabic poetry within a contemporary theoretical framework. It will also add a valuable non-western perspective to the field of World Literature.

Erick Gong (Economics) and a colleague from the International Food Policy Institute have received funding from IFPRI and a program for alumni of the Hewlett Dissertation Fellowships program for a two-year research project in Kenya titled “Can Savings Accounts Save Lives?Financial products for improving sexual and reproductive health.” The goal of this project is to see if providing women with financial independence in the form of mobile phone savings accounts can help them better manage risk in their daily lives.

Leger Grindon (Film & Media Culture) had an article, titled, “Taking Romantic Comedy Seriously” in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004) and Before Sunset (2004) in The Blackwell Companion to Film Comedy ed. Andrew Horton and Joanna Rapf (Malden, MA., Wiley-Blackwell, 2012). pp. 198-216.

William B. Hart (History) has published an essay, “The Unsettled Periphery: The Backcountry on the Eve of the American Revolution,” in The Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution, Edward G. Gray and Jane Kamensky, Eds. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2013): 30 – 46.

Barbara Hofer (Psychology) has received funding for her 2013-14 leave from the Danish Institute for Study Abroad.  She will be teaching one course, Virtual Selves: Psychology and Emerging Technology, and conducting research on digital connections and the study abroad experience.  The award covers a stipend, expenses for two study trips in Denmark, as well as housing and round trip travel.

Gregg Humphrey (Education Studies) has been nominated for the Vermont Campus Compact Engaged Educator Award. 

Anne Kelly Knowles (Geography) finally saw her book on the iron industry published: Mastering Iron: The Struggle to Modernize an American Industry, 1800-1868 (University of Chicago Press, 2013). Maps for the book were made by former Geography student and staff member Chester Harvey. In November 2012, Anne was the recipient of the first annual American Ingenuity Award for historical scholarship from Smithsonian magazine. She and the eight other awardees were honored at a gala ceremony at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C.

Andi Lloyd (Biology) published an article in the Canadian Journal of Forest Research.  Lloyd, A.H., P.A. Duffy, and D.H. Mann. 2013.  Nonlinear responses of white spruce growth to climate variability in interior Alaska.  Canadian Journal of Forest Research.  43: 331-343 

Patricia Manley (Geology) has been appointed to the America Geophysical Union Education Award Committee for two years. She was also elected as Chair of the Geoscience Division for the Council on Undergraduate Research for three years. 

Brett Millier (English & American Literatures) has received a 2013-2014 Fulbright Scholar grant in support of her appointment as a visiting professor at the University of Yaounde I in Yaounde, Cameroon. She will be teaching American Literature in the graduate program of the Department of English and advising masters and doctoral students.

Kathryn Morse (History and Environmental Studies) has been awarded a fellowship from the Charles Warren Center for American Studies at Harvard University which provides support for her 2013-14 leave.  She will spend the year participating in the Center’s workshop on “The Environment and the American Past” and working on her book project titled “The View from Here: Picturing America’s Environmental Past.” This project uses photographs and other visual sources to draw students and scholars into historical thinking about the environment, particularly but not exclusively with regard to social inequalities as revealed through close attention to human interactions with the material world. It builds from Morse’s years of teaching environmental history with images in the Middlebury classroom, and from her recent essay, published in the June 2012 Journal of American History, “There Will Be Birds: Images of Oil Disasters in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries.”

Elizabeth Morrison  (Religion) has received an AAS-CIAC Small Grant from the China and Inner Asia Council of the Association of Asian Studies. This grant will help to fund a library trip to Beijing during her 2013-14 leave, thus providing support for her research project titled, “Finding One's Place in a Story of Decline: Medieval and Early Modern Chinese Buddhist Narratives of the Deterioration and Death of the Buddhist Tradition."

The Environmental Studies program has been awarded a grant by the Northern New England Campus Compact for a project led by Diane Munroe, Coordinator for Community Based Environmental Studies. The grant is funded by the Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Education program and is intended to support NNECC’s Campuses for Environmental Stewardship efforts. The grant will fund efforts by the ES program and individual affiliated faculty to incorporate community-connected experiences focused on the topical areas of either climate change or water quality into their courses next year. Participating faculty include Molly Costanza-Robinson (Chemistry, Biochemistry and ES), Michelle McCauley (Psychology), Jeff Munroe (Geology), Jonathan Isham (Economics and ES), Rebecca Kneale Gould (Religion and ES), and Catherine Ashcraft (ES). 

Kamakshi Murti (Professor Emerita of German) has had her book entitled, To Veil or not to Veil: Europe’s Shape-Shifting ‘Other,’ published by Peter Lang International Publishers, Cultural Identity Studies, Vol. 26, 2013. Edited by Helen Chambers.

Peter Nelson (Geography) has received funding from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to develop a research partnership with HUD in conjunction with his ongoing cooperative research with the Economic Research Service of USDA. This expanded collaborative effort will use American Housing Survey Micro-Data to further analyze the geography of high cost lending in rural America during the Great Recession.  

Paul Sommers (Economics) has had several papers published recently. In addition to a paper titled, “Eat Fresh, Be Happy?” (co-authored with Tik Root, Dan Crepps, and Ben Wessel), three others appeared. All were published in the Journal of Recreational Mathematics. Leo R. Moses*, Trevor R. Truog*, and Paul M. Sommers, "Is the Gap between 'Haves' and 'Have-Nots' Really Widening," Journal of Recreational Mathematics, Vol. 37(2), 2013, pp. 95-101. 

Carolyn J. Kooi*, Jessica S. Ebersole*, and Paul M. Sommers, "t-Time on Cruise Ships," Journal of Recreational Mathematics, Vol. 37(2), 2013, pp. 102-107. 

Jaehyuk Lee*, Eric M. Wilson*, Owen J. Witek*, and Paul M. Sommers, "Marriage Gets an Assist from the NHL," Journal of Recreational Mathematics, Vol. 37(2), 2013, pp. 108-113 

*Former or current Middlebury College students

Paul also published:  

Paul M. Sommers, "A Modern-Day Parade of Dwarfs (And A Few Giants)," Atlantic Economic Journal, 2013 (DOI) 10.1007/s11293-012-9340-4 

and

Paul M. Sommers, "World War II Cover Artist: Trudy White," First Days, Vol. 58, No. 1, pp. 9-13

Grace Spatafora (Biology) has had a manuscript appear in the January 2013 issue of the Journal of Bacteriology.  Several of her research students contributed to the document (denoted with *)*Haswell, J.R., B.W. Pruitt*, L.P. Cornacchione*, C.L. Coe*, E.G. Smith*, and G.A. Spatafora.  2013. Characterization of the functional domains of the SloR metalloregulatory protein in Streptococcus mutans.  J. Bacteriology, 195:126-134.

Rebecca Tiger (Sociology/Anthropology) had her book Judging Addicts: Drug Courts and Coercion in the Justice System  http://nyupress.org/books/book-details.aspx?bookId=6817#.UPFwEO1hhUs, published by NYU Press  

Edward Vazquez (History of Art & Architecture) has been awarded a fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) in support of his 2013-14 leave. He will spend the year in Germany completing a book project titled,Aspects: Fred Sandback’s Sculpture. The book will be the first scholarly monograph of this modern artist who made dramatic, room-scaled installations crafted from individual strands of yarn stretched in simple geometric forms across gallery space. In addition, he also has been awarded a one-month residency at the Henry Moore Institute in Leeds, England, a center for the study of modern sculpture, to facilitate work on the same project.  

Bill Waldron (Religion) was awarded a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities which provides support for his 2012-13 leave and ongoing research. Titled, An Introduction to the Yogacara School of Indian Buddhism, this book project aims to provide a useful and relatively accessible introduction to one of the most influential yet complex schools of Indian Buddhist thought: Yogacara, or "Practitioners of Yoga." This school argues that though we are usually caught up in the "theatre of our minds," it is possible, through the practice of yogic insight, to see through our own cognitive constructions and act more compassionately and wisely for the benefit of others. 

December 2012: Recent Faculty Accomplishments

Leticia Arroyo Abad (Economics), with co-coordinators at Denison, Scripps, Furman, and Williams, has received funding through the AALAC Mellon 23 Collaborative Workshop program for a workshop titled Change and Continuity: Economic History in the Liberal Arts Context, to be held in April 2013 at Denison University.  The workshop builds on past efforts and will focus more explicitly on research and teaching in economic history, while continuing to explore the close relationship that economic history has to many fields within economics.  

Leticia also received funding from the National Science Foundation to research the history of fiscal capacity, inequality, and growth in Latin America. Her work is part of the Global Prices and Income History Group, a long-term, NSF-funded collaborative effort administered by the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Ilaria Brancoli Busdraghi (Italian) contributed an essay called “Proctor and Barre: The Marble and Granite Quarries and the Italian Stoneworkers in Vermont, 1990-1915” to Nature Transformed: Edward Burtynsky’s Vermont Quarry Photographs in Context, edited by Juliette Bianco and Pieter Broucke.

Pieter Broucke (Director of the Arts; History of Art & Architecture) has had a very notable accomplishment recently, with the publication of Nature Transformed: Edward Burtynsky’s Vermont Quarry Photographs in Context, edited by Juliette Bianco and Pieter Broucke. University Press of New England, 2012.   This is a co-edited catalog of a photography exhibition at the Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth that will be on display at our museum next spring.

His co-editor is the Assistant Director of the Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth, with whom he also co-curated the exhibition itself.  The exhibition consists of Burtynksy’s photographs, historical material, maps, chunks of granite and marble, and text, all contextualizing the images. The catalog does the same thing: contextualize the images of Burtynksy.

In addition to being a co-editor Pieter wrote the introduction.  

Jeff Carpenter (Economics) has had two articles appear:

Network Architecture, Cooperation and Punishment in Public Goods Experiments, with Shachar Kariv and Andrew Schotter, the Review of Economic Design, 16(2): 93-118 (2012).

Which Measure of Time Preference Best Predicts Outcomes: Evidence from a large-scale field experiment, with Stephen Burks, Lorenz Goette and Aldo Rustichini, the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, 84(1): 308-320 (2012).

Luis H. Castañeda (Spanish) published a novel for young adults in October, Viaje al norte del verano (Lima: Alfaguara (serie roja)).  In July, he published a magazine article: "Los lazos de la autoría: las novelas de Edgardo Rivera Martínez.” Libros & Artes, Revista de la Biblioteca Nacional del Perú. XI.54-55 (July 2012): 27-29.
 
Sunhee Choi (Chemistry & Biochemistry) and Matt Wolf (Midd ’12) co-authored an article which recently appeared:

Wolf, M. W.; Choi, S. "Disproportionation of Pentaammineruthenium(III)-Nucleoside  Complexes Leads to Two-Electron Oxidation of Nucleosides without Involving Oxygen  Molecules" J. Biol. Inorg Chem. 2012, 17, 1283-1291, DOI 10.1007/s00775-012-0942-8.

Svea Closser (Anthropology) received a contract from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation a year ago for a comprehensive research project aimed at assessing the impact of the global polio eradication initiative on strengthening routine immunization and primary health care.  With the help of a full time coordinator, this project involved consultants and paid staff conducting research in Nepal, India, Pakistan, Ethiopia, Rwanda, Nigeria, and Angola. Seven Middlebury undergraduates also made substantial contributions to the research. Portions of the work were subcontracted to ISciences, a quantitative analysis firm in Burlington, and CARE International, a major NGO.  An article on methodology has been published, and a results article and report will be released in the coming months.

Elizabeth (Tina) Endicott's (Professor Emerita of History) book, A History of Land Use in Mongolia: the Thirteenth Century to the Present, was published in November 2012 by Palgrave Macmillan.

Huda Fakhreddine (Arabic) has been offered a NEH fellowship to work on a project titled A Study of Classic Arabic Poetry through the Lens of Metapoesis.

Leger Grindon (Film & Media Culture) published the essay, “Cycles and Clusters:  The Shape of Film Genre History” in Film Genre Reader IV edited by Barry Keith Grant Austin:  University of Texas Press, 2012) pp. 42-59.   This book appeared in November 2012.

Leger also published “Taking Romantic Comedy Seriously in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004) and Before Sunset (2004) in The Blackwell Companion to Film Comedy ed. Andrew Horton and Joanna Rapf (Malden, MA., Wiley-Blackwell, 2012).  pp. 198-216.

Kirsten Hoving contributed an essay called “Digging Deep: Edward Burtynsky’s Quarry Photographs” to Nature Transformed: Edward Burtynsky’s Vermont Quarry Photographs in Context, edited by Juliette Bianco and Pieter Broucke.

Jeff Howarth (Geography) was awarded a fellowship by the Marion and Jasper Whiting Foundation to support his project "Mapping Cook’s Narratives on Tahiti."

Jason Mittell (Film & Media Culture) has had two new book chapters appear:

“Wikis and Participatory Fandom,” in The Participatory Cultures Handbook, edited by Aaron Delwiche and Jennifer Henderson (Routledge, 2012), 35-42.  and

Book chapter: “The Wire in the Context of American Television,” in The Wire: Race, Class & Genre, edited by Liam Kennedy and Stephen Shapiro (University of Michigan Press, 2012), 15-32.

Jason also published a refereed article: “Playing for Plot in the Lost and Portal Franchises <http://www.eludamos.org/index.php/eludamos/article/view/vol6no1-2> ,” Eludamos: Journal for Computer Game Culture <http://eludamos.org/> , 6:1 (Spring 2012).

Finally, Jason’s article "Narrative Complexity in Contemporary American Television" was translated and published in German (in Populäre Serialität: Narration - Evolution - Distinktion, edited by Frank Kelleter, Transcript: 2012), Polish (in The Television's Fall? Transformations of Medium, edited by Tomasz Bielak, Mirosław Filiciak and Grzegorz Ptaszek, Scholar Publishing House: Warsaw 2011), and Portuguese (in MATRIZes, 5:2, Spring 2012).

Kathryn Morse’s (History, Environmental Studies) article titled,  “There Will Be Birds:  Images of Oil Disasters in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries,” appeared in Journal of American History 99:1 (June 2012), 124-134.

Will Pyle  (Economics) has been selected to participate in the U.S. Dept. of Education’s Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad program for Summer 2013.   The award covers all expenses for the four-week seminar, titled Social Sciences in China.   During the course of visiting four cities, the seminar will examine China’s economic system and growth, political and legal systems, and social and demographic changes.  Will intends to use the experience to help boost the China-related content in his elective courses and, specifically, to learn more about urban land issues.

Pete Ryan (Geology) has been awarded a grant through the National Science Foundation’s RUI program to research rates and mechanisms of mineral reactions and associated chemical changes that occur as tropical soils mature. The project, titled Landscape-scale Implications of Mineral Reaction Rates and Mechanisms in Tropical Soils: Insights from Soil Chronosequences and Synthesis Experiments, involves field work in Costa Rica during the first year, with one Middlebury undergraduate and collaborators from the University of Costa Rica, followed by lab and analytical work with collaborators at IACT in Granada, Spain that will involve one Middlebury undergraduate and a student from the University of Costa Rica. Over the next two years, four additional undergraduates will work on this project at Middlebury.

Pete was also awarded a fellowship by the Marion and Jasper Whiting Foundation to support his project "International Perspectives on Environmental Geochemistry from the Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Terra."

John Schmitt (Mathematics), with colleagues from Dartmouth College, Bard College, Haverford College, St. Michael's College, SUNY Albany, Wesleyan University, and Worcester Polytechnic Institute, has received funding for a series of four conferences on discrete mathematics to be held at various locations in the Northeast over the next two years.  The first was hosted by Middlebury at Bread Loaf during September.  The main purposes of these conferences are to enhance the national infrastructure for research and education in discrete mathematics by creating and strengthening a regional network of interacting researchers and to facilitate the dissemination of cutting-edge research ideas, methods and results.

Shawna Shapiro (Writing Program) published two peer-reviewed articles recently:

Shapiro, S. (2012).  Stuck in the remedial rut: Confronting resistance to ESL curriculum reform. Journal of Basic Writing, 30(2), 24-52.

Shapiro, S., & Leopold, L. (2012). A critical role for role-playing pedagogy. TESL Canada Journal 29(2), 121-130.

Paul Sommers (Economics) recently had an article appear in the Journal of Recreational Mathematics.  The article was co-authored with Mark B. Whelan ’10. The article is titled, “When is the Honeymoon Over for Baseball's New Stadiums?"

Paul also published an article in Atlantic Economic Journal.  The article was co-written with Andrew Somberg (’11).  

Somberg, Andrew K. (’11)and Paul M. Sommers, "Payrolls and Playoff Probabilities in Major League Baseball," Atlantic Economic Journal, Vol. 40 (September 2012), pp. 347-348.

Su Lian Tan (Music) received contracts for two new titles, Moo Shu Rap Wrap and Ming. Moo is the first collaboration with the Meridian Arts Ensemble (Lotus Lives). The other piece, Ming, has already been recorded by trumpet virtuoso Joe Burgstaller and received its world premier in Singapore at the Yong Siew Toh Conservatory on October 27.

Bill Waldron (Religion) has been offered a NEH Fellowship to work on a book project entitled An Introduction to the Yogacara School of Indian Buddhism.

Susan Watson (Physics) has been awarded supplemental funding from the National Science Foundation to cover travel expenses to Denmark for her and two students for each of the next two years. While at the University of Copenhagen, where her main collaborator has relocated, she and her students will continue the quantum physics research funded by the original grant. In addition, the supplemental funding will cover costs for these students to be trained at the National Center for Nanoscale Systems at Harvard.

September 2012: Faculty Spotlight

Will Amidon (Geology) has been awarded funding through the National Science Foundation's RUI mechanism for two years of research with collaborators at the University of California at Santa Barbara. The project, titled Reconstructing Mid-Miocene-to-Recent Paleo-Erosion Rates in the Eastern Andes, Northern Argentina, will involve five undergraduate researchers in investigating whether climate oscillations can be linked to changes in erosion rates over millions of years.

Jason Arndt (Psychology) has had several articles published recently:

Arndt, J. (2012). False recollection: Empirical findings and their theoretical implications. In B.H. Ross (Ed.) Psychology of Learning and Motivation, Vol. 56, pgs. 81-124. USA: Academic Press.

Arndt, J. (2012). The influence of forward and backwardassociative strength on false recognition. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 38, 747-756.

Giammattei, Jeannette (class of ‘10), & Arndt, J. (2012). Hemispheric asymmetries in the activation and monitoring of memory errors. Brain and Cognition, 80, 7-14.

David Bain (English and American Literatures) recently published a new book, "Bitter Waters: America's Forgotten Naval Expedition to the Dead Sea" (The Overlook Press/Penguin); he read from it in June at the New England Review Faculty and Alumni Readings at the Axinn Center. Also, several works have been released as e-publications under the colophon Gideon Abbey Press: two long-form nonfiction essays ("Camden Bound: Going Home After a Lifetime of Absence" and "The House on Hemenway Hill: A Writer's Unrequited Love For a 200-year-old Abandoned House") and a book-length collection of 37 essays, talks, and reviews, "Mighty Good Road: Writings on Railroads, the West, and American History."

Cates Baldridge (English & American Literatures) has had two items published: An article, "Antinomian Reviewers:  Hogg's Critique of Romantic-Era Magazine Culture in Confessions of a Justified Sinner," was published in the Winter 2011 issue of Studies in the Novel.  A book:  Prisoners of Prester John:  The Portuguese Mission to Ethiopia in Search of the Mythical King, 1520-1526, was just published by McFarland & Company.

Ian Barrow (History) has been awarded a fellowship from the Marion and Jasper Whiting Foundation for a project titled In the Footsteps of Mahatma Gandhi.  He will travel to three areas of South Asia, each of which exemplifies one or more of the major confrontations in Gandhi’s life. What he learns about how Gandhi and his actions are remembered will help him revamp the course he teaches on Gandhi.

Erik Bleich (Political Science) has published several items:  “France,” in David Samuels, ed., Case Studies in Comparative Politics, New York: Pearson, 2012: 114-49;  “Assessing Islamophobia though Survey Evidence: Where Do Muslims Really Stand?” with Rahsaan Maxwell, in Marc Helbling, ed., Islamophobia in Western Europe and North America, London: Routledge, 2012: 39-55; and “Les politiques de diversité raciale en France et en Grande-Bretagne: De l’incompréhension mutuelle à la concertation?” in James Cohen, Andrew J. Diamond, and Philippe Vervaecke, eds., L’Atlantique multiracial:. Discours, politiques dénis, Paris: Éditions Karthala, 2012: 181-203.

Christal Brown (Dance) was the choreographer of a five movement composition written by Jazz great Fred Ho, which was presented at the Guggenheim Museum in New York last November.  Shows were sold out and ended in standing ovations each night.  Link to commercial:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LSts0EKHMUk
Link to first review: http://www.icareifyoulisten.com/2011/11/channeling-optimism-in-fred-hos-the-sweet-science-suite/

The Jack Miller Center has awarded the College a grant to help with the expenses of Constitution Day events to be held at Middlebury this fall.  This grant is the result of a proposal submitted by Keegan Callanan (Political Science), with the assistance of Murray Dry (Political Science).  The Jack Miller Center is “dedicated to enriching education in America’s founding principles and history”.     
Jane Chaplin (Classics) has published “Conversations in History: Arrian and Herodotus, Parmenio and Alexander” in Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies 51 (2011) 613-633.

Ricardo Chavez-Castaneda (Spanish and Portuguese) was awarded the 2012 Julio Cortazar Ibero-American Short Story Prize for his short story “Ladrón de niños.”

Molly Costanza-Robinson (Environmental Studies and Chemistry & Biochemistry), with co-coordinators at Vassar and Furman, has received funding through the Mellon Foundation’s Faculty Career Enhancement program for an inter-institutional project titled Sustainability in Europe: The Limits of Possibility. This award provided funding for a diverse group of 18 faculty from Vassar, Denison, Furman, DePauw, Claremont-McKenna, and Middlebury (including Rebecca Gould, Andrea Olsen, Lynn Owens, and Helen Young) to embark on a 10-day travel seminar to Denmark and Germany to engage with scholars and community leaders associated with successful environmental sustainability initiatives. The goal is bring back case studies, problem solving strategies, ideas, and inspiration for advancing sustainability education across the curriculum.

James Calvin Davis (Religion) co-authored an essay with Charles T. Mathewes entitled, "Saving Grace and Moral Striving: Thrift in Puritan Theology."  It appeared as a chapter in Thrift and Thriving in America: Capitalism and Moral Order from the Puritans to the Present, published by Oxford University Press this past summer.

Ophelia Eglene (Political Science) received two fellowships to pursue her research this coming year.  In the fall, she has a Visiting Scholar fellowship at the European Union Center of Excellence University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  In the spring, she will be a Visiting Fellow at the Centre d’Etudes et de Recherches Internationales (CERI), Sciences Po in Paris.  Her project is titled Non-Compliance with EU Environmental Law: A Case Study of 15 Court Cases.

Florence Feiereisen (German) has had several items appear recently. She published a monograph: Der Text als Soundtrack—der Autor als DJ: Postmoderne und postkoloniale Samples bei Thomas Meinecke; Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann, 2011. She published an edited volume: Florence Feiereisen and Alexandra M. Hill, eds. Germany in the Loud Twentieth Century. Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, 2011; and coauthored (with A. Hill): “Introduction to the Study of German Sounds: Tuning in to the Aural Ether” (p. 1-16) and “Bonus Track: Teaching German Soundscapes” (accompanying the book; made available on Oxford University Press’s website: http://www.oup.com/us/companion.websites/9780199759385) Finally, she published an article in a peer-reviewed journal: “Eternal Interns: Kathrin Röggla’s Literary Treatment of Gendered Capitalism.” Studies in Twentieth and Twenty-first Century Literature 35: 1 (Winter 2011): 95-113.

Irina Feldman (Spanish and Portuguese) had an article published recently. “Heterogeneidad jurídica y violencia fundacional en Todas las sangres” appeared in Revista de Crítica Literaria Latinoamericana Año XXXVI, No 72. Lima-Boston, 2do semestre de 2010, pp. 233-252.

Eliza Garrison (History of Art & Architecture) has published her book, Ottonian Imperial Art and Portraiture: The Artistic Patronage of Otto III and Henry II (Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate, 2012).  The book received a research award from the International Center of Medieval Art and the Samuel H. Kress Foundation.

Noah Graham (Physics) has been awarded a three-year grant from the National Science Foundation for work with collaborators at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Dartmouth College, Tübingen University in Germany, and Stellenbosch University in South Africa on a project titled Scattering Theory Casimir Methods and Coherent Structures in the Early Universe. The project, which will involve three undergraduate researchers, will focus particularly on techniques for calculating quantum-mechanical Casimir forces and on how oscillons — stable, localized, self-organizing lumps of nonlinear waves — might affect the process of cosmic reheating that followed the Big Bang.

Heidi Grasswick (Philosophy) has published an edited volume, Feminist Epistemology and Philosophy of Science: Power in Knowledge, edited Heidi Grasswick (Dordrecht: Springer) 2011. Heidi has also been awarded a grant by the National Science Foundation to fund a project titled Trusting Knowledge: Agency, Dependence, and Responsible Knowing in a Scientific World. Starting from the premise that knowing agents’ social locations shapes their possibilities for knowledge, it willdevelop a model that explores the need for, and limits of, trust in science. The project will provide support for her 2012-13 leave and for two undergraduate research assistants and will culminate in an eight-chapter monograph on the trust and trustworthiness required for scientific institutions and laypersons to engage in sound and effective knowing.

Leger Grindon published “American Romantic Comedy Film,” an annotated bibliography in the Film and Media section of Oxford Bibliographies Online, July 2012.

Suzanne Gurland (Psychology) received a VGN pilot project grant to support research into children’s prior expectancies of their teachers as a causal determinant of the quality of their relationships with those teachers (title: Do children's expectancies determine teacher-student relationship quality?). The grant provides funding for summer effort during 2012 and includes funds for Dr. Gurland and one student to attend the American Psychological Association’s annual meeting.

Barbara Hofer (Psychology) has had several items published recently with student co-authors (noted with an asterisk), including:

Hofer, B. K. & Bendixen, L. D. (2011). Personal epistemology: Theory, research, and future directions. APA Handbook of Educational Psychology. Washington: American Psychological Association.

Hofer, B. K.,*Lam, C.-F., *DeLisi, A. (2011). Understanding evolutionary theory: The role of epistemological development and beliefs. In R. Taylor and M. Ferrari (Eds.), Epistemology and science education: Understanding the evolution vs. intelligent design controversy (pp. 95-110). New York: Routledge.

Hofer, B. K. (2011). Student-parent communication in the college years: Can college students grow up on an electronic tether? The Bulletin of the Association of College Student Unions International, 79(2), pp. 36-41.

Kirsten Hoving (History of Art and Architecture) has published an essay, "Digging Deep: The Vermont Quarry Photographs of Edward Burtynsky," in Nature Transformed: Edward Burtynsky's Vermont Quarry Photographs in Context, an exhibition catalog accompanying a traveling exhibition of Burtynsky's work.  She also published an essay entitled "Joseph Cornell's Universe: Gravity's Attractions," in the edited volume Gravity and Levity in Art.   Her photographs continue to earn recognition in national and international photo circles.  Her series of photographs, Night Wanderers, was recently featured in Square magazine, published in the United Kingdom. The same series was also featured in Lenscratch.  An article about her work will appear in the Canadian magazine 180, and a slide show of the Night Wanderers will be part of the Outer Limits Talk-Photo event, which is part of the Second Look photo festival in Bristol, United Kingdom.  In March, one of her photographs was included in an exhibition in Florence at the Auditorium of the Duomo, and another was shown at the exhibition, "Intimacy and Voyeurism," at California Institute of Integrated Studies in San Francisco.

Jeff Howarth (Geography) has been awarded a fellowship from the Marion and Jasper Whiting Foundation for a project titled Mapping Cook’s Narratives on Tahiti.  He will spend one month during his 2012-2013 leave visiting Tahiti.  The main objective of his project is to map information contained in the personal journals of Captain James Cook and his crew in order to visualize relationships between people and places that may not be discernible by reading.  Based on this project, he plans to develop new teaching materials for his classes at Middlebury including Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems, Cartographic Design, and Geography of Islands.    

Jeff Howarth (Geography) and Jeanne Albert (Center for Teaching, Learning & Research) have each received a small grant to develop a blended approach to courses they’re scheduled to teach this coming year:  GEOG 0120 -Fundamental of GIS and MATH 0100 - A World of Mathematics.  These grants are part of the Next Generation Learning Challenges Wave 1 grant initiative based at Bryn Mawr College.  The purpose of this initiative is to integrate open source courseware modules available through the Carnegie Mellon Open Learning Initiative (CMU OLI) into traditional classroom-based STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) courses within a liberal arts college setting to enhance student engagement as a means of improving course completion, persistence in the science/math major, and college completion.

Kareem Khalifa (Philosophy) was awarded a grant to participate in a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute titled Experimental Philosophy, which was held at the University of Arizona.  In the seminar, he learned how to use experimental methods to explore philosophical questions concerning the nature of knowledge, understanding, and explanation.

Matt Kimble (Psychology) has been awarded a grant from the National Institute of Mental Health through NIH’s R15 AREA program. The grant provides three years of funding to support a project titled ERP and Eye Tracking Studies of Expectancy Bias in Trauma Survivors, which will engage six students over the life of the grant in research with people who have a history of trauma. The researchers will use electroencephalography, eye-tracking equipment, and subjects’ self-reported symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder to explore the nature and extent of subjects’ expectancy biases, a poorly understood area of PTSD research.

Chris Klyza (History) has been awarded a fellowship from the Marion and Jasper Whiting Foundation for a project titled Alaska:  Conservation in the Final Frontier. He will travel to Alaska to experience and photograph its landscapes and to better understand the issues at stake there, especially on lands managed by the major federal land management agencies. This trip is designed to significantly enhance two courses that he teaches every year, Conservation and Environmental Policy and Seminar on American Environmental Politics, as well as all his teaching of environmental studies.

Michael Kraus (Political Science) was elected the Vice-Chair of the Academic Council of the Prague-based Institute for the Study of the Totalitarian Regimes. The Institute, funded by the Czech Government to study, analyze and document Nazi and Communist crimes during 1938-1989, prepares publications, organizes exhibitions, seminars, professional conferences and public discussions.

Michael Kraus (Political Science and Russian & East European Studies) has received a 2012-2013 Fulbright Scholar grant in support of his research and teaching as a visiting professor at the Institute of Political Studies at The Faculty of Social Sciences, Charles University (Prague, Czech Republic). His research and teaching will focus on the rise and fall of communist regimes and on the challenges of democratization.

Michelle McCauley (Psychology) received a renewal of VGN grant to continue her work developing a new pediatric interview (title: Adapting the Cognitive Interview for Pediatric Health Interviews: Identifying Why the ECI Works). The grant provides funding for summer and academic-year effort from June 2012-May 2013 and includes a summer stipend for one undergraduate summer research student.

Tom Moran's (Chinese) translation of "Yesterday's Stray Dog Becomes Today's Guard Dog" by Liu Xiaobo has been published in Liu Xiaobo, "No Enemies, No Hatred: Selected Essays and Poems," edited by Perry Link et al. (The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2012). Chinese academic and author Liu Xiaobo was awarded the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize and is serving an eleven-year jail sentence on a charge of "incitement to subvert state power."
 
Elizabeth Morrison (Religion) was selected to participate this summer in a faculty seminar at Transylvania University in Kentucky, funded by the University’s Bingham Program for Excellence in Teaching. The seminar, titled Twenty-first Century Liberal Education: A Contested Concept, involved faculty from liberal arts colleges around the country. The award covers all costs of participation, including travel.

James Morrison (Political Science) has been awarded a fellowship to spend his leave this coming year at the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. The main focus of his research will be a book project titled An Unholy Trinity:   The Influence of John Locke, Adam Smith, and John Maynard Keynes on Britain’s Three Great Transformations. The project traces the processes by which these three key intellectuals developed, saw adopted, and helped to implement their foreign economic policy strategies in Britain.

Kevin Moss (Russian) & Mima Simić have published “Post-Communist Lavender Menace: Lesbians in Mainstream East European Film,” in Journal of Lesbian Studies, Vol. 15, No. 3, 271-283.

Peter Nelson (Geography) has received funding via a cooperative agreement from the Economic Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture to support a research project titled High Cost Mortgage Lending in Rural America and the Great Recession.   The goals of the project are to identify which rural communities and which rural residents are most prone to high cost lending and how the foreclosure crisis has impacted housing markets across rural America.  

Carrie Reed (Chinese) has received a Translation Grant from the PEN American Center for her translation of Youyang zazu 酉陽雜俎 (Miscellaneous Morsels from Youyang), a ninth century Chinese classical language miscellany by Duan Chengshi 段成式 (c. 800–863).  She estimates that this project, which will be the focus of her leave this coming year, will take about three years to complete. The full project consists of a popular version without many annotations as well as a carefully annotated version. Carrie comments, “Duan was a close observer of his world, a lover of the strange and the foreign, an amateur ethnographer, and recorder of stories and lore of all kinds.  He was unprejudiced in his sources, giving equal importance to every bit of information, whether from a slave, a monk, a civil servant or an imperial relative.”  

Tiffany Rhynard (Dance) recently premiered her documentary film, “Little House in the Big House,” at the Vermont International Film Festival in Burlington. The film chronicles four women in prison where they build a modular home from start to finish through the trades training program by Vermont Works for Women. Rhynard also presented her evening length dance theatre production, “Disposable Goods,” at the State University of Potsdam during a residency in October.

Burke Rochford (Religion) has published “Knocking on Heaven’s Door: Violence, Charisma, and the Transformation of New Vrindaban” in Violence and New Religious Movements (Oxford University Press) and “Boundary and Identity Work among Hare Krishna Children” in The Study of Children in Religions (New York University Press).  His book, Hare Krishna Transformed, was published in Polish this past Spring by Purana Press.

Pete Ryan (Geology) has been awarded a fellowship from the Marion and Jasper Whiting Foundation for a project titled International Perspectives on Environmental Geochemistry.  He will spend two months during his 2012-2013 academic leave at the Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (Andalucian Institute of Earth Sciences) in Granada, Spain. The main purpose of his trip is to become immersed in cutting-edge research that he can apply to classes he teaches at Middlebury, particularly Environmental Geochemistry, and can use in advising senior thesis research and other courses.  

John Schmitt (Mathematics) has had two peer-reviewed articles appear in print recently. The first is co-authored with Guantao Chen, Michael Ferrara, Ron Gould, and Colton Magnant.  It is entitled “Saturation numbers for families of Ramsey-minimal graphs.”  It appears in the Journal of Combinatorics, vol. 2 (2011), 435-456.  (Note: the article was accepted for publication this year, 2012, but is being published with 2011 date!) The second is co-authored with Andrzej Dudek.  It is entitled “On the size and structure of graphs with a constant number of 1-factors.”  It appears in Discrete Mathematics, vol. 312 (2012), 1807-1811.

Paul Sommers (Economics) has had several articles appear in Journal of Recreational Mathematics:  A recent issue of the Journal of Recreational Mathematics includes four papers co-authored with eight former or current Middlebury College students:

Green ('11), Connor E. and Paul M. Sommers, “Is a Defensive Tackle More Valuable Than a Quarterback?” Journal of Recreational Mathematics, Vol. 36(3), pp.233-239.

Rotatori ('14), Alexandra M., Kathryn K. Logan ('13), Alison J. McAnaney ('11), and Paul M. Sommers,  “Which Winning Streak in College Basketball Would UConn-sider the Best?” Journal of Recreational Mathematics, Vol. 36(3), pp. 222-229.

Farah ('12), David A., Johann N. Riefkohl ('13), Alexandra L. McAtee ('13), and Paul M. Sommers, “What’s the Spin on Serve Speed and Different Court Surfaces?” Journal of Recreational Mathematics, Vol. 36(3), pp. 244-250.

Magotswi ('11), Mwaki Harri and Paul M. Sommers, “Have Bonus Points Affected Scoring in the Rugby World Cup?” Journal of Recreational Mathematics, Vol. 36(3),
pp. 240-243.

In addition, Paul and former student Sarah King have published an article titled “An Analysis of Immigration Rates by State” in Atlantic Economic Journal.

Paul has also had a co-authored article titled “Speed Suits and Swimming t’s” published in the inaugural issue of Journal of Student Research.  His co-author was Alyssa Ha ’11.
Furthermore, Paul has had a research article titled "An Enigmatic Knapp Patriotic" appear in a recent issue of a hobby magazine entitled FIRST DAYS, the journal of the American First Day Cover Society.  The precise citation is:  Sommers, Paul M., "An Enigmatic Knapp Patriotic," FIRST DAYS, May 2012, Vol. 57, No. 3, pp. 36-38.

Paul has also had an article titled “An Analysis of Immigration Rates by State” published in the Atlantic Economic Journal: Volume 40, Issue 1 (2012), Page 103-104.

Other recent publications by Paul include:
Sommers, Paul M., “Do Baseball’s Northernmost Teams Play Hot in Cold Weather?” Journal of Recreational Mathematics, Vol. 36(4), 2012, pp. 327-329.

Fuqua, Sydney L., Lauren C. Redfield, Schooner J. Sonntag, and Paul M. Sommers, “Lennon? McCartney? Who was the Principal Author in ‘Lennon/McCartney’?” Journal of Recreational Mathematics, Vol. 36(4), 2012, pp. 330-335.
Sommers, Paul M., “Are Yankees vs. Red Sox Games Too Slow?” Journal of Recreational Mathematics, Vol. 36(4), 2012, pp. 336-342.

Paul was also a winner of the 2011 Philip H. Ward Award for Excellence in First Day Cover Literature, presented by the American First Day Cover Society.  Paul’s piece tied for second place. Sommers' “Walter G. Crosby’s Earliest First Day Covers” appeared in the January 15, 2011 issue of First Days.

John Spackman (Philosophy) was awarded a grant to participate in a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute titled Investigating Consciousness:  Buddhist and Contemporary Philosophical Perspectives, which will be held at the College of Charleston in South Carolina.    During the institute, John’s goal was to develop more fully a Buddhist-inspired view of the relation between the mental and the physical that he has been working on over the past few years, what he has called "neutral non-dualism."

Mark Spritzer (Biology) has received funding from BioTherapeutix, LLC to support experiments related to research with colleagues at other institutions on the efficacy of various growth factor derivatives in treating the cognitive symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. Mark also received a renewal of his VGN grant to support ongoing research related to adult neurogenesis and spatial cognition (title: Effects of Testosterone on Spatial Working Memory and Adult Neurogenesis). The grant provides funding for 2012 summer effort and includes summer stipends for three undergraduate students and academic-year support for two additional undergraduate assistants.

Mark Stefani (Psychology) has been awarded an R15 research grant through the National Institutes of Health’s AREA program. This grant will support collaborative work with Mark Spritzer (Biology) to investigate the role that the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) plays in impaired cognition in a rat model of schizophrenia. This grant includes funding for three undergraduate research assistants over the next three years and for laboratory staff, research supplies, and travel to conferences.

Jacob Tropp (History) has published “Locust Invasions and Tensions over Environmental and Bodily Health in the Colonial Transkei” in David M. Gordon and Shepard Krech III, eds., Indigenous Knowledge and the Environment in Africa and North America (Ohio University Press, Ecology and History Series, 2012).

Neil Waters (Kawashima Professor Emeritus) has been awarded a fellowship from the Associated Kyoto Program to teach and conduct research in Japan during Fall 2012.    He will teach a course titled "The History of Pre-Modern Japan" for the AKP program at Doshisha University and will work on a research project titled, "Recycling Morality: the Life and Afterlives of Japan's Peasant Sage, Ninomiya Sontoku."

Linda White (Japanese Studies) has been awarded a Research grant from the Fulbright Scholar Program to spend her academic leave next year in Japan conducting ethnographic research in Tokyo with citizens and non-citizens, activists, and others concerned about the key document for family and citizenship registration in Japan.  She will be affiliated with Nihon University in Tokyo.  Project title: Family, Name, Citizenship: The Postwar Household Registration System and the Formation of Identity in Contemporary Japan.

Routledge has recently published Mark Williams' (Political Science) latest book on international relations and hemispheric affairs, titled Understanding US-Latin American Relations: Theory and History (New York: Routledge, 2011). Mark has also published a peer reviewed chapter in an edited volume: “The New Balancing Act: International Relations Theory and Venezuela’s Foreign Policy,” in Jonathan Eastwood and Thomas Ponniah, eds., The Revolution in Venezuela: Social and Political Change Under Chávez (Harvard University Press, David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, 2011).

Frank Winkler (Physics) has received funding from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Chandra X-Ray Observatory General Observer Program for a project that involves collaborators from the Space Telescope Science Institute, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, North Carolina State University, and the RIKEN Institute in Japan. This project involved a comprehensive study of the remnant of the supernova that occurred in 1006 C.E., generally believed to be the brightest stellar event in recorded human history.  Through a series of observations from the Chandra Observatory extending for over 200 hours, Winkler and his colleagues expect to obtain beautifully detailed X-ray images of this supernova remnant, which they will use to study the debris from its explosion and the interaction with its environment.  Frank has also recently been awarded funding from the NASA-funded Space Telescope Science Institute for two research projects related to observations made from the Hubble Space Telescope earlier this year. The project, “Stellar Life and Death in M83: A Hubble-Chandra Perspective,” in collaboration with an international team of scientists from the US and Australia, and led by colleagues at Johns Hopkins University, is  conducting the most detailed study ever undertaken of the galaxy M83, some 15 million light years away.  Known as the "southern pinwheel," has produced six supernovae over the past century---more than any other galaxy except one.       

In addition, Frank’s project, “The Remarkable Young Supernova Remnant in NGC 4449,” in collaboration with colleagues at STScI, Dartmouth, and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, will focus on the remains from a supernova that probably occurred 60-100 years ago.  Although no sightings of this event were recorded at the time, today its remnant is the brightest such object known in the Universe.

Phani Wunnava (Economics) has recently published an article titled "Economic impact of a private sector micro-financing scheme in South Dakota <http://community.middlebury.edu/%7Ewunnava/Recent_Papers/SBEJ_2011.pdf> " (with D. Benson, A Lies, and A. Okunade) Small Business Economics: An Entrepreneurship Journal Vol.36, #2, (2011), pp. 157-168.
In addition, Phani’s tenure as a Research Fellow at Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) has been extended to Dec. 31, 2014.
Phani also recently learned that his paper, "GLOBALIZATION, INSTITUTIONS, AND THE ETHNIC DIVIDE: RECENT LONGITUDINAL EVIDENCE" was recently listed on SSRN's Top Ten download list for: ERN: Economic Growth & Aggregate Productivity in Developing Economies (Topic).

Dana Yeaton (Theatre and Dance) recently published “Men in Heat,” a play first produced at the Boston Playwright’s Marathon. The script appears in Shorter, Faster, Funnier, an anthology of short, comic plays.

Helen Young (Biology) has been awarded a Research grant from the Fulbright Scholar Program to spend April through July in Scotland during her academic leave in 2013.   She will be based at the University of Stirling where she will collaborate with a colleague on pollination projects involving raspberries, bumblebees, and citizen science.  Her research is titled Exploring and promoting landscape features associated with bee pollinators in Scotland.

Finally, Potomac Theatre Project's 6th New York season was particularly successful, especially the company's production of Caryl Churchill's Serious Money. The NY Times wrote:
 
"If there’s a sharper-edged evening of entertainment in Manhattan at the moment, it involves juggling knives ...the over-the-top comedy remains raw and urgent... Serious Money smartly directed by Cheryl Faraone, is swift and sleek; the cast is nimble, dancing in tightly choreographed numbers, chanting wickedly amusing songs at the end of each of the two acts...of special note are Tara Giordano’s cleareyed Scilla, David Barlow’s oily Zackerman.... The spare, clever set by Hallie Zieselman features chandeliers that double as telephone banks and Champagne bars."
 
Other faculty and Middlebury alums received strong critical response:
 
"Alex Draper’s realization of Billy Corman comfortably inhabits the gray area between reptilian and seductive often commandeered by dynamic men. Megan Bryne so viscerally presents her cocksure patrician, her speeches seem as if they might draw blood. " Woman Around Town     
 
"(Monster benefits) from "Mark Evancho's evocative lighting." Stage and Cinema
 
And finally, Richard Romagnoli conceived and produced an evening's tribute to the New England Review, with readings by four authors from the NER and a lively reception after the event.

October 2011: Faculty Spotlight

Leger Grindon (Film & Media Culture) has another new book in print, Knockout: the Boxer and Boxing in American Cinema (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2011).  Leger was recently interviewed about this book on NPR’s program, “Only a Game.”
 
Michael Katz (Russian and East European Studies Emeritus) has received a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support an Emeritus Fellowship.  The fellowship will allow Michael to prepare an annotated edition of three interrelated works of fiction from the Tolstoy family, accompanied by selected excerpts from the principals’ personal letters, diaries, and notebooks. When complete, the volume will be an important resource for understanding the debate over sexual morality in late 19th – early 20th century Russia.
 
Leticia Arroyo Abad (Economics & IPE) was awarded the Department of Education Summer Library Research Fellowship in Latin American Studies at the University of Pittsburgh. This grant will allow her to continue her research on Latin American historical inequality. In particular, this project evaluates the impact of colonial institutions on inequality in Peru.

Timothy Billings
(English & American Literatures), together with co-organizers at Scripps and Vassar, received funding through the Mellon Foundation’s Faculty Career Enhancement grant for an inter-institutional initiative titled
21st Century Shakespeare. This project provided funding for a group of Literature and Theatre faculty from Scripps, Vassar, DePauw, Denison, Furman, Harvey Mudd, Rhodes, and Middlebury (including also James Berg, Dan Brayton, and Marion Wells) to attend the five-play tour of the Royal Shakespeare Company in New York City this past summer, and then to collaborate in a pedagogy workshop at Scripps in the spring centered on new approaches to Shakespeare.

Jeff Carpenter (Economics) recently published the following article:  Jeffrey Carpenter, Justin Garcia, J. Koji Lum, “Dopamine receptor genes predict risk preferences, time preferences, and related economic choices,” Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, 42(3) (2011): 233-261.
 
Sunhee Choi (Chemistry & Biochemistry) has had an article published recently with several students and alumni.  The article, “Two Electron Oxidation of Deoxyguanosine by a Ru(III) Complex without Involving Oxygen Molecules through Disproportionation,” was published in Inorganic Chemistry 2011, 50, 6567-6574. Co-writers were: Ryu, DW (Midd '11); DellaRocca, JG (Midd '07); Wolf, M. W. (Midd '12); and Bogart, J. A. (Midd '11).
 
Matthew Dickerson
(Computer Science) has had several items published recently.  His book on computation and the philosophy of mind, The Mind and the Machine: What it Means to be Human and Why it Matters,was published in May 2011.  His peer-reviewed paper titled “Two-Site Voronoi Diagrams under Geometric Distance Functions,”coauthored with Gill Barequet (Technion - Israel Institute of Technology), David Eppstein (Univ. of California, Irvine), David Hodorkovsky (Technion - Israel Institute of Technology) and Kira Vyatkina (Saint Petersburg State University), was published in the proceedings the 8th International Symposium on Voronoi Diagrams in Science and Engineering. The paper was presented at the conference in Qingdao, China, on June 28-30 by one of his co-authors.

Matt also had an article on literature, “‘Bread, Surpassing the Savour of a Fair White Loaf to One Who Is Starving’: Food and the Culture of Hobbits” published in The Other Journal. The online version can be found at http://theotherjournal.com/2011/07/21/bread-surpassing-the-savour-of-a-fair-white-loaf-to-one-who-is-starving-food-and-the-culture-of-hobbits/

Matt also contributed a chapter, “Water, Ecology, and Spirituality in Tolkien’s Middle-Earth,” exploring ecology, literature, and spirituality in Light Beyond All Shadows: Religious Experience in Tolkien's Work, edited by Paul E. Kerry and recently published by Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.  
 
James Fitzsimmons (Sociology/Anthropology) was awarded a summer fellowship at the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collections in Washington, DC, for work leading to completion of his second book manuscript, The Archaeology of Death in Ancient Mesoamerica.

Claudio González Chiaramonte (Director, School in Latin America) has published a book, Selling Americanism Abroad: U. S. Cultural Diplomacy toward Argentina, 1953-63 (Lambert LAP: Saarbrucken- Germany, 2010).

Kirsten Hoving
(History of Art and Architecture) is showing a group of her photographs at Central Booking Gallery in New York in September and October in an invited group exhibition called “Now You See It: Color and the Mind’s Eye” featuring artists working in various media.  Her photographs have recently been included in group exhibitions at the NorthLight Gallery in Tempe, Arizona, and The LightBox Gallery in Astoria, Oregon.  One of her photographs was recently acquired for the permanent collection of the Center for Fine Art Photography in Fort Collins, Colorado, where she was awarded the juror’s honorable mention award for her photograph, Fallen Angel, in the group exhibition “Blue.” And one of her photographs was chosen for a collaborative project with artists and writers for the forthcoming book, Water’s Edge. She was a finalist and was awarded honorable mention in the second annual Julia Margaret Cameron awards, an international competition that attracts photographers from around the world.  She also published an article titled “Optical Allusions” in Central Booking Magazine and an essay on Joseph Cornell and gravity in a book of collected essays called Gravity and Levity in Art.  

Jon Isham
(Economics) participated in a faculty seminar at Transylvania University in Kentucky, funded by the University’s Bingham Program for Excellence in Teaching this past summer. The seminar, “Twenty-first Century Liberal Education: A Contested Concept,”involved faculty from liberal arts colleges around the country.
 
Chris McGrory Klyza (Political Science, Environmental Studies) recently had a book chapter published:
“Climate Change and the Management of National and State Owned Land in the United States,” 2011, in Climate Change, Environment, and Land Policies, edited by Gregory K. Ingram and Yu-Hung Hong, Cambridge, MA: Lincoln Land Institute.

Anne Knowles (Geography) has received a Newberry Library Short-Term Fellowship in the History of Cartography for research on her new book project, a critical biography of two twentieth-century cartographers whose innovative maps helped shape Americans’ national and global consciousness from the interwar years to the 1960s. The working title of the book is Mapping the American Century: Richard Edes Harrison and Erwin Joseph Raisz.    
 
Anne also received a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipend to support her work on a book, “Holocaust Geographies.”  This book is the culmination of an international, multi-disciplinary collaboration between nine geographers and historians developing new approaches for studying the Holocaust with geographical methods.   Anne and a colleague from Texas State University, San Marcos have headed up this project.  Anne will be the lead editor of the book, for which she will co-write the introduction, conclusion, and two case-study essays.

Jim Larrabee (Chemistry & Biochemistry) has recently published an article titled “Electronic and geometric structure of the organophosphate-degrading enzyme from Agrobacterium radiobacter (OpdA).” It appeared in the Journal of Biologic Inorganic Chemistry. Contributors to the article included two recent Middlebury graduates (noted with *): Ely, F.; Hadler, K. S.; Mitić, N.; Lawrence R. Gahan; David L. Ollis; *Plugis, N. M.; *Russo, M. T.; Larrabee, J. A.; Schenk, G.

Sam Liebhaber (Arabic) has been awarded a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support his academic leave in 2011-2012, during which he plans to complete work on a book project, Bedouin Without Arabic: Language, Poetry and the Mahra of Southeast Yemen. His goal is to create the first monograph-length analysis of the endangered Mahri language in its sociocultural context.  By engaging specifically with Mahri poetry and its reception in Southern Arabia, his work will have broader application to the field of Middle Eastern sociolinguistics and Bedouin vernacular poetry.

Andrea Lloyd (Biology) and colleagues involved in the Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research site in Alaska have received funding from the National Science Foundation for a project, Regional Consequences of Changing Climate-Disturbance Interactions for the Resilience of Alaska’s Boreal Forest.  The project is part of the NSF-LTER program, which provides ongoing support of basic scientific research and monitoring in key ecosystems around the U.S. The grant will enable Andi and one undergraduate research assistant to study how climate change and disturbance by insect herbivores are affecting productivity in the forests of central Alaska.  

John Maluccio (Economics) and colleagues from the University of Colorado and the Paris School of Economics have been awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation for a research project titled Effects of Social Transfer Programs on Cognitive, Social, and Economic Outcomes. This project will determine the effects of the Nicaraguan Conditional Cash Transfer (CCT) program on outcomes such as cognitive abilities, schooling, and labor market success, ten years after the start of the program. Included is funding for Middlebury undergraduates to serve as research assistants.

Jason Mittell’s (Film & Media Culture) book chapter, "Serial Boxes: DVD-Editionen und der kulturelle Wert amerikanischer Fernsehserie,” recently appeared in Serielle Formen: Von den frühen Film-Serials zu aktuellen Quality-TV- und Onlineserien, edited by Robert Blanchet et. al. (Schuren, 2011). (Translated into German from the English original.)

Tom Moran (Chinese) has been awarded a Research grant from the Fulbright Scholar Program to spend four months in China during Spring 2012.  He will be based at Capital Normal University in Beijing, working on a research project titled,   Xu Gang and the Origins and Development of Ecological Literature in Reform-Era China.  He plans to write the first English-language monograph on contemporary Chinese shengtai wenxue (ecological literature), a history of the genre from 1988 to the present.    
 
Tom’s translation of "The Voice of History and the Voice of Women: A Study of Huang Shuqin's Women's Films" by Xingyang Li and his co-translation with Robin Visser  (UNC Chapel Hill) of "Post-Taiwan New Cinema Women Directors and Their Films: Auteurs, Images, Language" by Yu-shan Huang and Chun-chi Wang have been published in
Chinese Women's Cinema: Transnational Contexts, edited by Lingzhen Wang, (Columbia University Press, 2011).

Tom's translations of Jiang Hao's poems, "The Shape of the Sea" and "A Poem of a Wandering Immortal," have also been published in
Push Open the Window: Contemporary Poetry from China, edited by Qingping Wang, Sylvia Li-chun Lin and Howard Goldblatt (Copper Canyon Press, 2011).

Amy Morsman (History) has been awarded a short-term fellowship for research at the Massachusetts Historical Society in Boston (the Malcolm and Mildred Freiberg Fellowship for research in African-American history). She will be working on her project titled
North of Reconstruction: Race, Gender, and Reform in the Postbellum North and will be visiting the archives at the MHS during her leave in 2011-2012.

Bill Peterson’s (Mathematics) co-authored book Probability Tales was published recently.  The book is a culmination of efforts begun during Bill’s last leave.
 
Will Pyle (Economics) recently reported that his article, “Organized business, political competition and property rights: evidence from the Russian Federation,” was published in Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, April 2011, 2-31.
 
Patricia Saldarriaga (Spanish and Portuguese) recently had an article published. "Resemantización del ícono guadalupano en el México posbarroco,” in Del Barroco al Neobarroco: Realidades y transferencias culturales, edited by R. de la Fuente Ballesteros, Jesús Pérez-Magallón, J. R. Jouve-Martín. Valladolid, Spain: Universitas Castellae, 2011. 285-294.
 
Roger Sandwick and Kathy Jewett (both Chemistry & Biochemistry) have co-written an article, “Ribose 5-Phosphate Isomerase Investigations for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory <http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ed100670a> ,”
for the Journal of Chemical Education.   

John Schmitt
(Mathematics) recently published an article, “A survey of minimum saturated graphs” with Jill Faudree (University of Alaska Fairbanks) and Ralph Faudree (University of Memphis) in the Electronic Journal of Combinatorics 18 (2011).

Katy Smith-Abbott (History of Art, Dean of Students) was one of five semi-finalists within her institutional category who were nominated as Outstanding First-Year Student Advocate.  She was listed on an honor roll of advocate semifinalists at their awards ceremony at the 30th Annual Conference on The First-Year Experience in Atlanta, Georgia, February 2011.
 
Paul Sommers
(Economics) had a paper appear in the Journal of Recreational Mathematics recently. The paper, “Are First-Round NFL Draft Picks Better than Second-Round Picks?,” was written with former student Jeffrey S. Everson ’10.  This paper is an extension of work he did with Paul in Economics 0485 (Spring 2010), the senior seminar on "The Economics of Sports."
 
In the most recent issue of the Journal of Recreational Mathematics, there are four papers which Paul co-authored with eight former or current Middlebury College students:
 
Green ('11), Connor E. and Paul M. Sommers, “Is a Defensive Tackle More Valuable Than a Quarterback?” Journal of Recreational Mathematics, Vol. 36(3), pp.233-239.
 
Rotatori ('14), Alexandra M., Kathryn K. Logan ('13), Alison J. McAnaney ('11), and Paul M. Sommers, “Which Winning Streak in College Basketball Would UConn-sider the Best?” Journal of Recreational Mathematics, Vol. 36(3), pp. 222-229.
 
Farah ('12), David A., Johann N. Riefkohl ('13), Alexandra L. McAtee ('13), and Paul M. Sommers, “What’s the Spin on Serve Speed and Different Court Surfaces?” Journal of Recreational Mathematics, Vol. 36(3), pp. 244-250.
 
Magotswi ('11), Mwaki Harri and Paul M. Sommers, “Have Bonus Points Affected Scoring in the Rugby World Cup?” Journal of Recreational Mathematics, Vol. 36(3), pp. 240-243.
 
Susan Watson (Physics) and collaborators at Harvard University have been awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation’s Physics at the Information Frontier (PIF) program to conduct research in the field of quantum information processing, in which the unusual features of quantum physics are harnessed to allow the rapid encoding and manipulation of information. The team of researchers will exploit the unique properties of carbon nanotubes, which are themselves newly understood and are a forefront area of fundamental physics, to create and investigate quantum bits – the fundamental building blocks of quantum computation. Over the course of three years, at least 6 undergraduates will be involved in this research effort.  The project is titled Carbon-based long-coherence quantum bit.

Phani Wunnava (Economics) has been appointed as a researcher at Employment Policy Research Network (EPRN). This is a policy based think-tank run by the Labor and Employment Relations Association (LERA) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

The National Science Foundation has awarded a Major Research Instrumentation grant to Middlebury College for acquisition of an integrated system of instrumentation to be used in lake-studies research conducted by faculty and students
. Under the direction of geology professors Patricia Manley and Thomas Manley, this grant will fund purchase of a multibeam sonar system (that provides detailed bottom bathymetry and characterization) and an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler. This equipment will be mounted on the College’s new research vessel, currently under construction, but can be transferrable for use by other vessels in the region. This new system will expand the range of research and curricular projects on Lake Champlain, involving other members of the geology department as well as faculty in biology and environmental chemistry.      
 
Middlebury College is one of the baccalaureate partner institutions participating in a major grant from the National Institutes of Health to the University of Vermont. This grant continues the Vermont Genetics Network support that has been a significant source of funding for faculty and student research in the past decade. The following faculty members received individual grants from this program to support their research this coming year:
 
Mark Spritzer (Biology)— Renewal of support for ongoing research related to adult neurogenesis and spatial cognition (title: Effects of prolactin and sexual experience on adult neurogenesis in male rats). The grant provides funding for summer and academic-year effort from June 2011-May 2012 and includes a stipend for one undergraduate student.
 
Mark Stefani
(Psychology)—Renewal of support for ongoing research that seeks to understand whether abnormalities in the balance between neural excitation and inhibition underlie the memory and decision-making problems associated with schizophrenia (title: The role of GABAergic signaling in schizophrenia-related cognitive disorders). The grant provides funding for summer and academic-year effort from June 2011-May 2012 and includes a stipend for one undergraduate student.
 
Michelle McCauley
(Psychology)—New project grant to adapt and test the effectiveness of a forensic interview protocol for use as a pediatric dietary interview (title: The Adapting the Cognitive Interview for Pediatric Health Interviews).  The grant provides funding for summer and academic-year effort from June 2011-May 2012, including academic leave salary, and stipends for two undergraduate research students.


May 2011: Faculty Spotlight

Bill McKibben (Scholar in Residence) has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.  He will be inducted at a ceremony in Cambridge, Massachusetts on October 1, 2011.

The book, Social Justice Education: Inviting Faculty to Transform Their Institutions (Stylus, 2010), edited by Kathleen Skubikowski (Writing Program, English), Catharine Wright (Writing Program), and Roman Graf (German) was published in late October.  Other Middlebury faculty involved in this project were Julia Alvarez (Writer in Residence); Priscilla Bremser (Mathematics); and Kamakshi Murti (German).  A Middlebury student contributed a chapter as well—Zaheena Rasheed ’11.

Julia Alvarez (Writer in Residence) has published, How Tía Lola Learned to Teach (Alfred A. Knopf/Random House Children's Books, 2010), a novel for middle readers, 8-12,second of a four book series, the Tía Lola stories.

Febe Armanios’ (History) book, Coptic Christianity in Ottoman Egypt, has been published by Oxford University Press.

Tom Beyer (Russian) has translated Mikhail Morgulis,Yearning for Paradise, into English from Russian, and the book has been published by CreateSpace and is also available as a Kindle edition.

 

Timothy Billings (English & American Literatures) and co-organizers at Scripps and Vassar have received funding through the Mellon Foundation’s Faculty Career Enhancement grant for an inter-institutional initiative titled 21st Century Shakespeare.  This project provides funding for a group of Literature and Theatre faculty from Scripps, Vassar, DePauw, Denison, Furman, Harvey Mudd, Rhodes, and Middlebury (including also James Berg, Dan Brayton, and Marion Wells) to attend the five-play tour of the Royal Shakespeare Company in New York City this summer, and then to collaborate in a pedagogy workshop at Scripps in the spring centered around new approaches to Shakespeare.

Erik Bleich (Political Science) had an article, “Social Research and ‘Race’ Policy Framing in Britain and France,” appear in British Journal of Politics and International Relations, 13 (January 2011): 59-74.

Daniel Brayton (English & American Literatures) whose book, Shakespeare’s Hungry Ocean: Ecocriticism, Early Modern Culture, and the Marine Environment, is under contract with the University of Virginia Press, has learned that he won the Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) First Book Prize. The Modern Language Association is the professional organization of language and literature scholars (English, French, Spanish, etc), and NeMLA is its northeast regional body.

Jeff Carpenter (Economics) published “Do Social Preference Increase Productivity? Field experimental evidence from fishermen in Toyama Bay,”with Erika Seki, Economic Inquiry, 49(2): 612-630 (2011).

Jeff also published “Jumping and Sniping at the Silents: Does it matter for charities?” with Jessica Holmes (Economics) and Peter Matthews (Economics), the Journal of Public Economics, 95(5-6): 395-402 (2011).

Jeff Carpenter (Economics) and Caitlin Myers (Economics) have published, “Why Volunteer? Evidence on the role of altruism, reputation and incentives,”in the Journal of Public Economics, 94 (11-12): 911-920 (2010).

Jeffrey Cason (Political Science, Dean of International Programs) has published a book, The Political Economy of Integration: The Experience of Mercosur (Routledge, 2011).

 

Mary Kay Cavazos (Religion) had a paper accepted to the Black Women’s Intellectual and Cultural History Project which will be holding its conference the end of April.  Her proposal was one of 40 selected out of 200 submissions.  The Project is headed up by some of the premier scholars in the field of African American women’s studies.

Ricardo Chávez-Castañeda (Spanish & Portuguese) has published two books, La última epidemia de risa and Desapariciones, with Biblioteca Mexiquense del Bicentenario, 2011.

 

Sunhee Choi (Chemistry & Biochemistry) had an article, “Oxidation of a Guanine Derivative Coordinated to a Pt(IV) Complex Initiated by Intermolecular Nucleophilic Attacks," published by Dalton Trans. 2011, 40, 2888-2897. The article was co-authored with Personick, M. L. '10; Bogart, J. A. '11; Ryu, DW '11; Redman, R. M. '12; Laryea-Walker, E. '12.

 

Svea Closser’s (Sociology/Anthropology) new book, Chasing Polio in Pakistan, was published by Vanderbilt University Press (2010).

 

Marcia Collaer (Psychology) and a colleague at St. Michael’s College have received funding through UVM’s NASA EPSCoR program (Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research) for their project Stress & spatial cognition: Effects of acute stress on spatial navigation & attention. Their research investigates the influence of stress on individuals’ ability to navigate virtual spatial environments and on their performance in spatial attention tasks.

James Calvin Davis (Religion) has published a new book, In Defense of Civility: How ReligionCan Unite America on Seven Moral Issues that Divide Us (Westminster John Knox Press, 2010).

 

Darién Davis (History) and a colleague from Vassar have received funding through the Mellon Foundation’s Faculty Career Enhancement grant for an inter-institutional initiative titled Intellectuals Abroad: Cross-National Influences of Dispersal during World War II and Beyond. The grantwill fund a workshop in New York City for 19 participants (from Middlebury, Vassar, Dennison, DePauw, Furman, Harvey Mudd, Rhodes, and Scripps) that will provide opportunities for them to enhance their knowledge and share ideas about the role and impact of the dispersal, exile and movement of intellectuals (broadly defined) across national borders since World War II.

Matthew Dickerson (Computer Science) has received funding from the National Science Foundation’s TUES program (Transforming Undergraduate Education in Science) program for a project  Teaching Computational Thinking through Multi-Agent Simulation: Increasing Recruitment, Retention, and Relevance of Undergraduate Computer Science. This three-year grant will support development of a new approach to introductory level Computer Science, with applications to both environmental studies and economics. It will be integrated into a new track in the major and will also help train students majoring in other disciplines in computational thinking.

James Douglas (Executive in Residence) has published a book, The Douglas Years (The Fourteenth Star Press, 2011).

Ophelia Eglene (Political Science) has had her new book, Banking on Sterling: Britain’s Independence from the Euro Zone, published by Rowman & Littlefield (2010).

Laurie Essig’s (Sociology & Women’s and Gender Studies) book, American Plastic:  Boob Jobs, Credit Cards and Our Quest for Perfection was recently published by Beacon (2011).

James Fitzsimmons (Sociology/Anthropology) received a Dumbarton Oaks grant for this summer.

James has also had an edited volume published--“Living with the Dead: Mortuary Ritual in Mesoamerica.”  It was co-authored with Izumi Shimada and published by University of Arizona Press.

Eliza Garrison (History of Art & Architecture) has learned that her recent book Ottonian Imperial Art and Portraiture(Ashgate, 2011)has received a research award from the International Center of Medieval Art (the ICMA) and the Kress Foundation.

Eliza also had an article appear in Gesta, a juried journal published by the International Center of Medieval Art.  Its full bibliographic info:  “A Curious Commission: The Reliquary of St. Servatius in Quedlinburg,” Gesta vol. 49, no. 1 (2010): 17-29.

Leger Grindon (Film & Media Culture) has published Hollywood Romantic Comedy:  Conventions, History, Controversies (Malden, Ma.:  Wiley-Blackwell, 2011).

Leger has also been awarded a “Robert De Niro Fellowship” from the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas at Austin to support his research in the Robert De Niro Papers at the Ransom Center.  The grant will fund his research trip to the Ransom Center this summer and further work on a project, “Subjectivity and Sensation:  Filming the Fights in Raging Bull.”

Larry Hamberlin (Music) has had a new book published, Tin Pan Opera: Operatic Novelty Songs in the Ragtime Era (Oxford University Press, 2011).

Mario Higa (Spanish & Portuguese) has recently had several items published.  They are:

A book titled Poemas reunidos by Cesário Verde, annotated edition by Mario Higa, published by Ateliê,  2010.  For this edition, he wrote a 59-page long critical introduction, established the text of the poems comparing several 19th and beginning 20th century editions, and prepared hundreds of cultural, historical, linguistic, and literary notes.

A second book:  Antologia de crônicas by Lima Barreto, annotated edition by Mario Higa, published by Lazuli/Companhia Editora Nacional, 2010.For this edition, he wrote a 19-page long critical introduction, selected 45 “crônicas” among over 400 written by Lima Barreto, and prepared the explanatory notes.

An article: “Diante das armadilhas da interpretação” [“Before the Interpretation’s Traps”]. Article on the 50th anniversary of Truth and Method by Hans-Georg Gadamer, published in O Estado de S. Paulo, Sep. 25th 2010, p. S6.

And an interview. “Ele acreditava numa verdade objetiva” [“He believed in an objective truth”]. Interview with Middlebury College Professor Jay Parini about his novel The Last Station, published in O Estado de S. Paulo, Nov. 20th 2010, p. S4.

Note: Founded in 1875, O Estado de S. Paulo is the oldest newspaper of São Paulo state. It has presently the largest circulation in São Paulo state and the fourth in Brazil.

Jessica Holmes (Economics) and Peter Matthews (Economics) have published, “Endogenous Participation in Charity Auctions,” in the Journal of Public Economics, 94(11-12): 921-935 (2010).

Jon Isham (Economics) has been selected to participate this summer in a faculty seminar at Transylvania University in Kentucky, funded by the University’s Bingham Program for Excellence in Teaching. The seminar, titled Twenty-first Century Liberal Education: A Contested Concept, will involve faculty from liberal arts colleges around the country. The award covers all costs of participation, including travel.

 

Hedya Klein (Studio Art) participated in a group exhibition titled Of Weeds and Wildness: Nature in Black & White which ran from January 13 to March 13 at Union College in Schenectady, NY.  It was curated by Sally Apfelbaum and Rachel Seligman.  Other artists represented included: Robert Adams, Desirée Alvarez, Arnold Bittleman, Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, Harold Edgerton, Robert Gober, William Kentridge, Danny Lyon, Abelardo Morell, Margaret Moulton, Michelle Segre, James Siena, Kiki Smith, Charles Steckler and Kate Temple.

Chris McGrory Klyza (Political Science, Environmental Studies) recently had an article published (co-authored with David Sousa): “Beyond Gridlock: Green Drift in American Environmental Policymaking.” Political Science Quarterly 125 (Fall 2010): 443-463.

Sam Liebhaber (Arabic) has been awarded a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support his academic leave in 2011-2012 during which he plans to complete work on a book project, Bedouin Without Arabic: Language, Poetry and the Mahra of Southeast Yemen. His goal is to create the first monograph-length analysis of the endangered Mahri language in its sociocultural context.  By engaging specifically with Mahri poetry and its reception in Southern Arabia, his work will have broader application to the field of Middle Eastern sociolinguistics and Bedouin vernacular poetry.

 

Sam was also awarded a grant from the Fulbright Middle East and North Africa Regional Research Program for a research project, The Mahra of Oman and the Imazghen of Morocco: Language Diversity and Language Ideology in the Arab World. He was unable to accept this award because the dates overlap with those for his NEH Fellowship that funds related, but different research.

Shannon Donegan ‘08 , John Maluccio (Economics), Caitlin Myers (Economics), Purnima Menon, Marie Ruel, and Jean-Pierre Habicht have published, "Two food assisted maternal and child health nutrition programs help mitigate the impact of economic hardship on child stunting in Haiti," in Journal of Nutrition, 2010, 140(6): 1139-1145.  The article is based on Shannon’s senior thesis.

John Maluccio (Economics) and colleagues from the University of Colorado and the Paris School of Economics have been awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation for a research project Effects of Social Transfer Programs on Cognitive, Social, and Economic Outcomes. This project will determine the effects of the Nicaraguan Conditional Cash Transfer (CCT) program on outcomes such as cognitive abilities, schooling, and labor market success, ten years after the start of the program.  Included is funding for Middlebury undergraduates to serve as research assistants.

 

Patricia Manley (Geology) has been awarded a fellowship from the Marion and Jasper Whiting Foundation to support a project, Geology of National Parks.  She will travel through the northwest United States, where she will experience and photograph active volcanoes in the region’s National Parks and the Mt. St. Helens National Volcanic Monument.  These visits will inform and enhance her teaching in three introductory-level Geology courses.

Michelle McCauley (Psychology) has been awarded a grant from the Fahs-Beck Fund for Research and Experimentation at the New York Community Trust for a project, Translating Research into Application: Creating a Manual for Social Workers and Police to use the Cognitive Interview with Children. The goal is to develop and publish a training manual for professionals and practitioners who use the Cognitive Interview to collect information.

Sujata Moorti (Women’s & Gender Studies) and Laurie Essig (Sociology), along with colleagues at  Dennison, DePauw, Furman, Harvey Mudd, Scripps, and Vassar, have received funding through the Mellon Foundation’s Faculty Career Enhancement grant for an inter-institutional initiative,  Queering the Curriculum:  A Proposal for Re-envisioning the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Through workshops at Middlebury, this project is intended to stimulate participants to make changes in the curriculum at their respective institutions.  There will be follow up meetings next year to share experiences and assess progress.   Interested faculty should contact Sujata or Laurie about participating.

 

Tom Moran’s (Chinese) translation of Wu Zuguang's 1942 play "Return on a Snowy Night" was published in December in The Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Drama, edited, with a critical introduction, by Xiaomei Chen (Columbia University Press, 2010):  448-546.

Furthermore, Tom was invited to serve as one of five jury members for the 2011 Newman Prize for Chinese Literature, representing North America. The other jury members were from Great Britain, Hong Kong, Taiwan and China. In October 2010 the prize was awarded to Han Shaogong.

Elizabeth Morrison (Religion) has had a new book recently published, The Power of Patriarchs:Oisong and Lineage in Chinese Buddhism (Brill, 2010).

Amy Morsman’s (History) book, The Big House After Slavery: Virginia Plantation Families and their Postbellum Domestic Experiment, was published in the fall with University of Virginia Press.

Amy has also learned that she has received a Malcolm and Mildred Freiberg Fellowship at the Massachusetts Historical Society to help support the research for a second book project on gender, race reform, and Reconstruction in the North.

Caitlin Myers (Economics), Grace Close ‘11, Laurice Fox ‘12, John William Meyer ‘10, and Madeline Niemi ’11, have published an article, "Retail Redlining:  Are Gasoline Prices Higher in Poor and Minority Neighborhoods?," in Economic Inquiry, forthcoming.  The student co-authors were all in Caitlin’s 2009 Winter Term course Deconstructing Discrimination.

Victor Nuovo’s (Philosophy, emeritus) book, Christianity, Antiquity, and Enlightenment: Interpretations of Locke, was published by Springer (2011).

Middlebury College has received a renewal of a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support an Emeritus Fellowship for Victor Nuovo, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy.  The grant provides funding for research trips and other expenses related to his ongoing research on John Locke.

 

Linus Owens (Sociology/Anthropology) has been awarded a grant to participate in a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute, American Material Culture:  19th-Century New York, which will be held at the Bard Graduate Center in New York City.  He is currently working on a project researching mobilities in social movements, hoping to extend his focus to include not only moving bodies, but also objects. Further, he intends to incorporate the information from the course into his teaching, including more attention on material culture in his classes on cities and on the environment.

Cynthia Packert (History of Art & Architecture) has had a new book published, The Art of Loving Krishna: Ornamentation and Devotion, with Indiana University Press (2010).

Roberto Pareja (Spanish & Portuguese) has been awarded a fellowship from the Marion and Jasper Whiting Foundation to visit archives in Bolivia and Peru, where he will collect print and photographic materials for a new interdisciplinary seminar titled National Culture and Space: Art, Narrative, and Travel in 19th-Century Bolivia and Peru.

Patricia Saldarriaga’s (Spanish & Portuguese) article “La monstruosa creación de las imágenes divinas” appeared in an electronic magazine, La Habana elegante. Fall-Winter 2010, vol. 48.  See: http://www.habanaelegante.com/

Patricia also published an article (co-authored with Emy Manini) titled “Hacia la búsqueda del sentido en la representación: Juan Damasceno y Jacques Derrida,” Lienzo 31, 2010, 175-202.

Michael Sheridan (Sociology/Anthropology) has been awarded a fellowship from the Marion and Jasper Whiting Foundation for a project, African Landscapes in the Americas.  He will travel to three Caribbean islands and visit botanical gardens, sugar plantations, and farming communities there to inform development of a unit on African diasporic landscapes for his class Africa: Continuity and Change.

 

Paul Sommers (Economics) has recently published several articles, the first five of which appeared in the Journal of Recreational Mathematics:

--"'Born to Run' ... Chi-Square Tests: Mathematics in Music," Vol. 35(4), pp. 261-267;

--"Is There Home-Field Advantage in Interleague Play?," Vol. 35(4), pp. 268-274; and

--"Derby Drop-Offs" (co-authored with Nicholas B. Angstman ‘11, Andrea L. Buono ‘11, Trevor B. Dodds ‘11, and Andrew K. Somberg ‘11), Vol. 35(4), pp. 275-280.  The four student co-authors were members of Paul’s 2009 Winter Term course, “The Application of Statistics to Sports.”

--“Do New Ballparks Affect the Home-Field Advantage?” Vol. 36(1), 2011, pp. 16-20.

--“Does Shooting Efficiency Matter in Explaining NBA Salaries?” Vol. 36(1), 2011, pp. 21-23.

Note:  These final two articles are Paul’s 163rd and 164th journal articles with a total of 155 Middlebury College student co-authors.

Paul also published, "Have Sports Venues Mitigated the Home Foreclosure Crisis?," in Atlantic Economic Journal38 (December 2010): 459 and  “Real March Madness: Rewarding Schools for Low GSRs” in Atlantic Economic Journal.  The latter was co-written with Alyssa Allen Chong ’10.

 

Steve Snyder’s (Japanese Studies) translations into English of two Japanese novels, Yoko Ogawa’s Hotel Iris and Kotaro Isaka’s Remote Control, have recently been published.  His translation of Hotel Iris was a finalist for the Man Asian Literary Prize.

Louisa Stein (Film & Media Culture) has had an essay published recently, "'Word of Mouth on Steroids': Hailing the Millennial Media Fan," in Flow TV: Television in the Age of Media Convergence. New York: Routledge, 2011.

Steve Trombulak (Biology, Environmental Studies) has had the book he co-edited with Robert Baldwin published recently—Landscape-scale Conservation Planning (Springer, 2010).  Steve began working on this book during a Mellon-funded course release in fall 2008.

Frank Winkler (Physics) has received funding from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Chandra X-Ray Observatory General Observer Program for a project that involves collaborators from the Space Telescope Science Institute, Johns Hopkins University, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, and the University of New South Wales, Australia. A long Chandra observation will be done to detect and measure properties of X-ray sources in the spiral galaxy M83, located 16 million light years away--a galaxy in which the rates of star formation, and destruction via supernovae, is unusually high. The goal is to study the life cycle of stars, and how they interact with the interstellar medium to produce X-ray emission.

 

Rich Wolfson (Physics) published a paper, "Spreadsheet Lock-in Amplifier," in the November issue of The American Journal of Physics.  His coauthor, Darcy Mullen ‘10, is the daughter of one of Wolfson’s first thesis students, Peter Mullen ‘78.

Rich has also had a second edition of Essential University Physics published by Pearson Addison Wesley, 2010.

Phani Wunnava (Economics) has recently published an article, “The Value of Green: The Effect of Environmental Rankings on Market Cap,” co-authored with Nate Blumenshine ’09.5, published by Technology and Investment in November 2010.

Phani has also had a co-written journal article published in African Finance Journal,  “Southern African Economic Integration: Evidence from an Augmented Gravity Model.”   It was co-written with Thierry Warin (Economics), Kirsten Wandschneider (formerly of the Middlebury Economics Department), and Moshi Optat Herman ’06.