Middlebury

 

Sections

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AMST0104A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0104A-F14

CRN: 92181

Television & American Culture
Please register via FMMC 0104A

Television & American Culture
This course explores American life in the last six decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to its future in digital convergence, we will consider television's role in both reflecting and constituting American society through a variety of approaches. Our topical exploration will consider the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of a variety of television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, and the medium's technological and social impacts. 2 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen.

AMST0200A-F14

CRN: 92658

Global Cities of the U.S.

Global Cities of the United States
In this seminar we will engage the study of New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles as "global cities." We will explore each as a site of networks that link populations in the United States to people, things, media, money, and ideas beyond the borders of the nation-state. The principal themes and issues covered during the semester will include the formation of transnational communities, flows of labor and capital, cultural production, and religious responses to diaspora. 3 hrs. lect.

AMST0202A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0202A-F14

CRN: 91767

The American Mind
Please register via HIST 0202A

The American Mind
We will consider the history of influential American ideas, and ideas about America, from the Revolution to the present, with particular regard to changing cultural contexts. A continuing question will be whether such a consensus concept as “the American Mind” has the validity long claimed for it. Among many writers we will read are Thomas Jefferson, Alexis de Tocqueville, William James, Martin Luther King, Reinhold Niebuhr and Betty Friedan. (Previously taught as HIST/AMST 0426)

AMST0204A-F14

CRN: 92552

Black Comic Cultures

Black Comic Cultures
In this course we will explore a range of black comic cultures, analyzing their emergence and transformation from the early 20th century to the present. Specifically, we will examine blackface minstrels of the early 20th century such as George Walker and Bert Williams, Bill Cosby’s performances in the 60s, and the ribald humor of LaWanda Page’s 1970s party records, before moving to the urban scene embodied in television shows such as Def Comedy Jam. We will also engage with theoretical materials that help us analyze black comedy as multidimensional, such as John Limon’s Stand-up Comedy in Theory, or, Abjection in America. 3 hrs. lect.

AMST0209A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0209A-F14

CRN: 91017

Am. Lit. & Cult: origins-1830

American Literature and Culture: Origins-1830
A study of literary and other cultural forms in early America, including gravestones, architecture, furniture and visual art. We will consider how writing and these other forms gave life to ideas about religion, diversity, civic obligation and individual rights that dominated not only colonial life but that continue to influence notions of "Americanness" into the present day. 3 hrs. lect./dics.

AMST0214A-F14

CRN: 92623

Capturing Nature

Mastodons, Mermaids, and Dioramas: Capturing Nature in America
Why did 18th-century museums stuff and mount exotic and domestic animals? Why does the American Museum of Natural History still house dioramas of so-called native peoples hunting? How has the study and staging of nature transferred into various kinds of artistic expression? In this course we will examine the intertwining of art, science, and ecology in the United States from the 1700s to the present day. Objects of study will include museum dioramas, scientific models, artifacts and artworks collected during scientific expeditions, and the work of Walton Ford and Christy Rupp, contemporary artists whose work engages ecological issues. 3 hrs. lect.

AMST0237A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0237A-F14

CRN: 92645

Emergence of Black Modernism
Please register via ENAM 0237A

Emergence of Black Modernism, 1900-1938
The modern period stands as one of the landmarks of African American literary, artistic, political, and intellectual history. At the crossroads of rebellion and experimentation that defined modernism, black writers—American and immigrants—forged new genres to express the complexity of the black experience. In this course we will track their creations by closely reading key texts like those of W.E.B. Du Bois, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larsen, and Jean Toomer. At the same time, we will examine the broader intellectual and cultural terrain that influenced these authors such as film, music, and visual arts. 3 hrs. lect.

AMST0241A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0241A-F14

CRN: 92647

Sexuality in the U.S.
Please register via GSFS 0241A

Sexuality in the United States: Histories and Identities
What does sexuality mean? In the United States the meanings of sexuality are highly contested, historically and in the present. Working from an interdisciplinary perspective, we will look at different historical and theoretical approaches to thinking about issues of sexuality and to writing its histories. Drawing from feminist scholarship, queer theory, and lesbian, gay, and transgender studies, we will discuss sexual identities, representations of sexuality, and sexual cultures, and examine how intersecting categories such as race, class, disability, and gender influence how sexuality is understood. 3 hrs. lect.

AMST0243A-F14

CRN: 92624

American Bodies

American Bodies
In this course we will examine the material culture of the body and the body as material culture. Themes to be explored include skin (tattoos, tans, cosmetics), muscle (exercise and ideal bodies, historical and contemporary), adornment (fashion, jewelry, body modification practices), health crazes, performance, medical imaging, and enhancement (fictional and technological cyborgs, plastic surgery). We will explore practices that fragment the body and objects that were exchanged as tokens of affection, such as 19th century hairwork and eye miniatures. Historical figures to be discussed include cosmetics magnate Madame C.J. Walker, health enthusiasts Sylvester Graham and the Kellogg brothers, bodybuilder and exercise entrepreneur Eugen Sandow, dancer Josephine Baker, efficiency expert Frederick Winslow Taylor, and P.T. Barnum’s collaborations with performers such as Tom Thumb and the conjoined twins Chang and Eng. 3 hrs. lect.

AMST0245A-F14

CRN: 92186

American Landscape: 1825-1865

American Landscape: 1825-1865
This course will explore American landscape painting through an interdisciplinary approach, employing art, literature, religion, and history. In studying the landscape paintings of Thomas Cole, Asher B. Durand, and Frederic Church, we will also consider the commercial growth of New York City; the myths and legends of the Catskill Mountains; the writings of James Fenimore Cooper, Washington Irving, and Henry David Thoreau; the opening of the Erie Canal; and the design and construction of Central Park. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0260A-F14

CRN: 92188

American Disability Studies

American Disability Studies: History, Meanings, and Cultures
In this course we will examine the history, meanings, and realities of disability in the United States. We will analyze the social, political, economic, environmental, and material factors that shape the meanings of "disability," examining changes and continuities over time. Students will draw critical attention to the connections between disability, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, socioeconomic status, and age in American and transnational contexts. Diverse sources, including films and television shows, music, advertising, fiction, memoirs, and material objects, encourage inter and multi-disciplinary approaches to disability. Central themes we consider include language, privilege, community, citizenship, education, medicine and technology, and representation.

AMST0295A-F14

CRN: 92444

Across the Great Divide

Across the Great Divide: Science, Humanities, and the American Landscape
The American landscape encompasses a diversity of built and natural environments. In this course, we will survey 200 years of history, using the tools of science and the humanities to understand how people have changed the landscape and how the landscape has shaped its human inhabitants. We will read historical, literary, and scientific works—and employ a variety of archival and aesthetic materials—to explore moments of transformation within four geographic regions: New England, the Midwest, the West, and the South. In so doing, we will arrive at an understanding of the interdependency of cultural and ecological history and the intersections between scientific and humanistic modes of inquiry. Readings will emphasize primary texts, and will include writings by Harriett Beecher Stowe, George Perkins Marsh, and photography by Dorothea Lange and others.

AMST0310A-F14

CRN: 92625

Livin' for the City

Livin' for the City
In this course we will engage the idea of the "ghetto" as constructed through literature, film, music, and television. Our exploration will relate this concept to geographic spaces and to a socially-constructed set of ideas about urban African American spaces and communities. We will combine critical textual analysis with fundamental concepts from human geography and social history to explore shifting conceptions of the “ghetto”, consider its impact on urban African American space, and examine how the responses of urban black American artists affect, resist, and change its imaginative geography. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0358A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0358A-F14

CRN: 92060

Reading Slavery and Aboliltion

Reading, Slavery, and Abolition
In this course we will study both black and white writers' psychological responses to, and their verbal onslaughts on, the "peculiar institution" of chattel slavery. We will work chronologically and across genres to understand how and by whom the written word was deployed in pursuit of physical and mental freedom and racial and socioeconomic justice. As the course progresses, we will deepen our study of historical context drawing on the substantial resources of Middlebury's special collections, students will have the opportunity to engage in archival work if they wish. Authors will include Emerson, Douglass, Jacobs, Thoreau, Stowe, Walker, and Garrison. 3 hrs. sem.

AMST0372A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0372A-F14

CRN: 92225

The Civil Rights Revolution
Please register via HIST 0372A

The Civil Rights Revolution
A study of the quest for a more inclusive American polity in the twentieth century. The modern civil rights movement is the central focus, but this course offers more than a survey of events from Montgomery to Memphis. It explores the pre-World War II roots of the modern black freedom struggle, the impact of the heroic phase of the civil rights movement, and the ambiguous developments since 1970. This course employs a "race relations" perspective, stressing the linkages among the experiences of African Americans, whites, and other groups. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

AMST0372Y-F14

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0372Y-F14

CRN: 92226

The Civil Rights Revolution
Please register via HIST 0372Y

The Civil Rights Revolution
A study of the quest for a more inclusive American polity in the twentieth century. The modern civil rights movement is the central focus, but this course offers more than a survey of events from Montgomery to Memphis. It explores the pre-World War II roots of the modern black freedom struggle, the impact of the heroic phase of the civil rights movement, and the ambiguous developments since 1970. This course employs a "race relations" perspective, stressing the linkages among the experiences of African Americans, whites, and other groups. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

AMST0372Z-F14

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0372Z-F14

CRN: 92227

The Civil Rights Revolution
Please register via HIST 0372Z

The Civil Rights Revolution
A study of the quest for a more inclusive American polity in the twentieth century. The modern civil rights movement is the central focus, but this course offers more than a survey of events from Montgomery to Memphis. It explores the pre-World War II roots of the modern black freedom struggle, the impact of the heroic phase of the civil rights movement, and the ambiguous developments since 1970. This course employs a "race relations" perspective, stressing the linkages among the experiences of African Americans, whites, and other groups. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

AMST0400A-F14

CRN: 90013

Theory and Method

Theory and Method in American Studies (Junior Year)
A reading of influential secondary texts that have defined the field of American Studies during the past fifty years. Particular attention will be paid to the methodologies adopted by American Studies scholars, and the relevance these approaches have for the writing of senior essays and theses. (Open to junior American studies majors only.) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0408A-F14

CRN: 91290

Am Art In Context:
Art & Life of Winslow Homer

American Art in Context: Art and Life of Winslow Homer
Although generally regarded as a popular painter of American life, Winslow Homer often provides a penetrating and sometimes disturbing view of post-Civil War America. Among the topics to be considered: Homer's paintings of the Civil War; his illustrations of leisure and recreation; and his depictions of women and children in the Gilded Age. During the second half of the course, we will turn our attention to Homer's landscape paintings of the Adirondacks, the Caribbean and the Maine coast, as well as his seascapes of the Gulf Stream and the North Atlantic. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0420A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
IGST0420A-F14

CRN: 92356

Visual Culture of the Americas
Please register via IGST 0420A

Visual Cultures of the Americas
From murals to monuments and telenovelas to veladoras, this bilingual [Spanish/English] seminar will explore the role of visual expression in the history of cultural formation throughout the Americas. We will take a hemispheric and transnational approach to our studies. As such, two related premises inform the material we will examine: images traverse the boundaries of nation-states, and they are intrinsically tied to the developments of modern history. We will combine theoretical works with a variety of still and moving images (artifacts of mass culture, photography, artwork, film, mixed media, and performance) to study the relationship between "visuality" and flows of culture throughout Latin and Anglo Americas. This course is equivalent to IGST 0420. 3 hr. sem.

AMST0500A-F14

CRN: 90097

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500B-F14

CRN: 90101

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500C-F14

CRN: 90112

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500D-F14

CRN: 90113

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500E-F14

CRN: 90114

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500F-F14

CRN: 90115

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500G-F14

CRN: 90116

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500H-F14

CRN: 90117

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500I-F14

CRN: 90118

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500J-F14

CRN: 90119

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500K-F14

CRN: 90120

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500M-F14

CRN: 91111

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500N-F14

CRN: 91262

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0705A-F14

CRN: 91653

Senior Research Tutorial

Senior Research Tutorial
This seminar will focus on the development of sophisticated research skills, the sharing with peers of research and writing in progress, and the completion of a substantial research project. Those writing one-credit essays will complete their projects over the course of this tutorial.