Middlebury

 

Sections

« Winter 2014 Spring 2014 Fall 2014 »

AMST0101A-S14

CRN: 21294

Intro to American Studies

Introduction to American Studies: American Representations of Crime and Violence
In this course we will offer an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of American culture and identity. Integrating a range of sources and methods, we will examine myths, symbols, values, and social changes that have been used to create and contest ideas of "Americanness." Sources for the course will include movies, fiction, political and religious tracts, advertising, TV shows, video games, music, and journalism. This year, we will focus on American portrayals of crime and violence in a wide range of texts and cultural artifacts that provide us with a larger sense of how these representations function in the formation of categories of gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, ethics and religion, as well as socio-economic class in American society. Texts and films will range from True Crime to Pulp Fiction and from street photography to pictures of prisoners at Abu Ghraib. 3 hrs. lect.

AMST0104A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0104A-S14

CRN: 22063

Television & American Culture
Please register via FMMC 0104A

Television & American Culture
This course explores American life in the last six decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to its future in digital convergence, we will consider television's role in both reflecting and constituting American society through a variety of approaches. Our topical exploration will consider the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of a variety of television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, and the medium's technological and social impacts. 2 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen.

AMST0210A-S14

CRN: 21880

Mod. American Cult. 1830-1919

Formation of Modern American Culture I: 1830-1919
An introduction to the study of American culture from 1830 through World War I with an emphasis on the changing shape of popular, mass, and elite cultural forms. We will explore a widely-accepted scholarly notion that a new, distinctively national and modern culture emerged during this period and that particular ideas of social formation (race, class, gender, sexuality, etc.) came with it. We will practice the interdisciplinary interpretation of American culture by exploring a wide range of subjects and media: economic change, social class, biography and autobiography, politics, photo-journalism, novels, architecture, painting, and photography. Required of all American studies majors. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0218A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GEOG0218A-S14

CRN: 22077

Cultural Geography
Please register via GEOG 0218A

Cultural Geography
What do landscapes mean? How are places created and invested with significance? Why do people struggle to control public and private space? In this course we will examine these and similar questions. The main goals are to illuminate the wealth of meanings embodied in the built environment and our metaphorical understandings of landscape, place, space, and geographical identity, and to teach skills for interpreting and representing those meanings. Lectures, course readings, small-group projects, and papers will draw on social theory and empirical approaches, with a regional emphasis on North America. 3 hrs. lect.

AMST0227A-S14

CRN: 22301

Asian Americas

Asian Americas
In this course we will investigate cultural transformations, cultural politics, and the cultural productions of and about Asian Americans. The themes of immigration, nation, and citizenship are central to the construction of the U.S. racial category of Asian. Those addressed within the category are highly diverse and differentiated along class, gender, and generational lines, yet the racial category structures particular kinds of experiences and possibilities for subjects. Historical transformations and contemporary issues in a variety of Asian American contexts will be investigated through a variety of texts including historical accounts, cultural studies, anthropological studies, autobiography, and fiction. 3 hrs. lect.

AMST0228A-S14

CRN: 22434

Development and the U.S.

Development and the United States
In this course we will explore the relationship between the United States and “Development”--the post-Second World War international project that emerged to help “modernize” the decolonizing world. We will investigate how the American modernization theory came to define the paths and goals of the international development project and how American policies of “nation building,” delineated U.S. relations with the “global south.” Readings will include theories on capitalist development and modernization, and discourses on American developmentalism in practice and their critiques 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0234A-S14

CRN: 21788

American Consumer Culture

American Consumer Culture
For many Americans in the 20th century, consumer goods came to embody the promise of the "good life." Yet mass consumption also fostered economic, political, and social inequalities and engendered anti-consumerist activism. In this course we will pursue an interdisciplinary approach to American consumer culture, focusing on the rise of commercialized leisure and advertising; the role of radio, television, and film in shaping consumer practices; and the relationship of consumerism to social inequality and democratic citizenship. Readings will include works by Veblen, Marcuse, Bordieu, Marchand, Cohen, and Schor. 3 hrs. lect.

AMST0240A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0240A-S14

CRN: 22357

Captivity Narratives

Captivity Narratives
Captivity narratives—first-person accounts of people's experiences of being forcibly taken and held against their will by an "other"—were immensely popular and important in early America; the captivity motif has been perpetuated and transformed throughout later American literature and film. In this course we will explore what these types of tales reveal about how Americans have handled the issues of race and racism, religion, gender, violence and sexuality that experiences of captivity entail. Beginning with classic Puritan narratives (Mary Rowlandson) and moving forward through the 19th and 20th centuries, we will consider the ways that novels (The Last of the Mohicans), autobiographies (Patty Hearst, Iraqi captivity of Pvt. Jessica Lynch) and films (The Searchers, Little Big Man, Dances with Wolves) do cultural work in shaping and challenging images of American national identity. 3 hrs. lect.

AMST0242A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0242A-S14

CRN: 22316

Film Comedy
Please register via FMMC 0242A

Film Comedy
A survey of American film comedy from the silent era to contemporary productions. The course will focus on various approaches such as clown comedy, romantic comedy, and satirical comedy. In addition, the course will explore screen comedy in the context of various theories of comedy, including the narrative design, the social dynamics, and the psychological understanding of humor. The filmmakers will include: Chaplin, Keaton, Lubitsch, Wilder, Woody Allen, among others. Screenings, readings and written assignments. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen.

AMST0246A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
HARC0246A-S14

CRN: 22179

American Painting to 1920
Please register via HARC 0246A

American Painting: Beginnings to the Armory Show
This course is an introduction to American painting from 17th century limner portraits to the rise of modernism in the twentieth century, with special attention to Copley, Cole, Church, Homer, Eakins, Sloan, and Bellows. Although we will trace the development of traditional categories of painting (landscape, portraiture, genre), our purpose will be to discover what the paintings tell us about the changing values and tastes of American culture. (Formerly HARC/AMCV 0246) 3 hrs. lect.

AMST0253A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0253A-S14

CRN: 22302

Science Fiction

Science Fiction
Time travel, aliens, androids, robots, corporate and political domination, reimaginings of race, gender, sexuality and the human body--these concerns have dominated science fiction over the last 150 years. But for all of its interest in the future, science fiction tends to focus on technologies and social problems relevant to the period in which it is written. In this course, we'll work to understand both the way that authors imagine technology's role in society and how those imaginings create meanings for science and its objects of study and transformation. Some likely reading and films include Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, H. G. Wells, The Island of Doctor Moreau, Ridley Scott, Blade Runner, and works by William Gibson, Ursula LeGuin, Octavia Butler and other contemporary writers. (Students who have taken FYSE 1162 are not eligible to register for this course). 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0263A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0263A-S14

CRN: 22303

American Psycho
Please register via ENAM 0263A

American Psycho: Disease, Doctors, and Discontents (II) (AL) *
What constitutes a pathological response to the pressures of modernity? How do pathological protagonists drive readers toward the precariousness of their own physical and mental health? The readings for this class center on the provisional nature of sanity and the challenges to bodily health in a world of modern commerce, media, and medical diagnoses. We will begin with 19th century texts and their engagement with seemingly "diseased" responses to urbanization, new forms of work, and new structures of the family and end with contemporary fictional psychopaths engaged in attacks on the world of images we inhabit in the present. Nineteenth century texts will likely include stories by Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Later 20th-century works will likely include Ken Kesey, /One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest/, Thomas Harris, /The Silence of the Lambs/, Susanna Kaysen, /Girl, Interrupted/, and Bret Easton Ellis, /American Psycho/.

AMST0308A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0308A-S14

CRN: 21873

Race: Sci, Med. & Diversity

The Power of Race: Science, Medicine, and Human Diversity
In this course, we will explore the manner in which ideologies of race have shaped the histories of science and medicine, and how scientists and medical practitioners have shaped the history of race. Topics will include the role of scientific knowledge in debates about racial slavery in the U.S., eugenics policies in the U.S. and Puerto Rico, tropical medicine in the Philippines, and public health policies in Los Angeles and San Francisco. We will pay particular attention to recent debates regarding the uses of race and genetic ancestry in biomedical research and practice, as well as genetic genealogy. 3 hrs. sem.

AMST0347A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0347A-S14

CRN: 22293

Families-American Ethnic Lits

Families in American Ethnic Literatures
In this course we will explore depictions of "the family" by authors of various ethnicities-in every case interaction with/integration into "American life" is at issue. Under that broad rubric, we will discuss a range of topics, including: the processes of individual and group identity erasure and formation; experiences of intergenerational conflict; considerations of the burden and promise of personal and communal histories; examinations of varied understandings of race, class, and gender; and interrogations of "Americanness." Authors include Ronald Takaki, Gloria Naylor, Arturo Islas, Sherman Alexie, Philip Roth, Julie Otsuka, Jhumpa Lahiri, Junot Diaz, Gish Jen, and Dinaw Mengestu. 3 hrs. lect.

AMST0500A-S14

CRN: 20031

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500B-S14

CRN: 20034

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500D-S14

CRN: 20041

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500E-S14

CRN: 20042

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500F-S14

CRN: 20043

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500G-S14

CRN: 20044

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500H-S14

CRN: 20045

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500K-S14

CRN: 21041

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500L-S14

CRN: 21237

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0710A-S14

CRN: 20037

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0705, and qualify to write two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710B-S14

CRN: 20048

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0705, and qualify to write two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710D-S14

CRN: 20049

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0705, and qualify to write two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710E-S14

CRN: 20051

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0705, and qualify to write two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710F-S14

CRN: 20052

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0705, and qualify to write two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710G-S14

CRN: 20053

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0705, and qualify to write two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710H-S14

CRN: 20054

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0705, and qualify to write two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710L-S14

CRN: 21239

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0705, and qualify to write two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)