Sections

« Summer Study 2017 Fall 2017 Winter 2018 »

AMST0175A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0175A-F17

CRN: 92233

Immigrant America
Immigrant America
In this course we will trace American immigration history from the late 19th to the turn of the 21st century, and examine the essential place immigration has occupied in the making of modern America and American culture. The central themes of this course will be industrialization and labor migrations, aftermaths of wars and refugees, constructions of racial categories and ethnic community identities, legal defining of "aliens" and citizenship, and diversity in immigrant experiences. To explore these themes, we will engage a range of sources including memoirs, novels, oral histories, and films.

AMST0205A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
HARC0205A-F17

CRN: 92345

World War I & American Art
World War I and American Art
This year (2017) marks the centennial of the United States’ entry into World War I. How did the “Great War” change American culture? How do we remember World War I, and how might its cultural products inform American identity? How did artists react to social turmoil and violence? In this course, we will examine the art and artifacts of American involvement in World War I, from posters (“Uncle Sam Wants You!”), flag parades, paintings, and films to prostheses, monuments, and memorials, as well as the war’s effect on gender roles and race relations. How might Middlebury observe the one hundredth anniversary of the war? 3 hrs. lect.

AMST0206A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0206A-F17

CRN: 92193

19th Century American Lit.
Please Register Via ENAM 0206
Nineteenth-Century American Literature
This course will examine major developments in the literary world of 19th century America. Specific topics to be addressed might include the transition from Romanticism to Regionalism and Realism, the origins and evolution of the novel in the United States, and the tensions arising from the emergence of a commercial marketplace for literature. Attention will also be paid to the rise of women as literary professionals in America and the persistent problematizing of race and slavery. Among others, authors may include J. F. Cooper, Emerson, Melville, Douglass, Chopin, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Hawthorne, Stowe, Alcott, Wharton, and James. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0208A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0208A-F17

CRN: 92006

Black Womanhood/Pop. Culture
Unruly Bodies: Black Womanhood in Popular Culture
In this course we will examine representations of black womanhood in popular culture, analyzing the processes by which bodies and identities are constructed as dangerous, deviant, and unruly. For example, materials will include the work of bell hooks and Patricia Hill Collins to analyze the imagery of black womanhood propagated by the television shows The Jerry Springer Show and Bad Girls Club. By contrast, we will also read Saidiya Hartman’s Scenes of Subjection as a lens through which to view “bad” black womanhood as a radically stylized means of redress in the Blaxploitation-era film Foxy Brown. 3 hrs. lect.

AMST0209A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0209A-F17

CRN: 90855

Am. Lit. & Cult: origins-1830
American Literature and Culture: Origins-1830
A study of literary and other cultural forms in early America, including gravestones, architecture, furniture and visual art. We will consider how writing and these other forms gave life to ideas about religion, diversity, civic obligation and individual rights that dominated not only colonial life but that continue to influence notions of "Americanness" into the present day. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0213A-F17

CRN: 92254

Intro to Latina/o Studies
Introduction to Latina/o Studies
In this course we will undertake an interdisciplinary investigation of the unique experiences and conditions of U.S. Latina/os of Caribbean, Latin American, and Mexican descent. We will critically examine transnational cultures, patterns of circular migration, and intergenerational transformations from a historical perspective while also using methodologies from the humanities and social sciences. Topics will include the conquest of Mexico’s northern frontier, Chicana/o and Nuyorican movements, Latina feminist thought, Latina/o arts, Central American migrations in the 1980s, Latina/o religiosities, as well as philosophies of resistance and acculturation. 3 hrs. lect.

AMST0232A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
MUSC0232A-F17

CRN: 91987

Music in the United States
Please register via MUSC 0232A
Music in the United States
In this course we will examine folk, classical, and popular music in the United States from the 17th century to the present. We will use historical and analytical approaches to gain insight into the music, the musicians, and the social and cultural forces that have shaped them. Students will explore music’s relation to historical events, other artistic movements, technological changes, and questions of national identity and ethnicity. Topics will include music in the British colonies, minstrelsy, American opera and orchestras, jazz, popular music, and the experimentalist composers of the 20th and 21st centuries. Music reading skills are useful but not required. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0245A-F17

CRN: 91542

American Landscape: 1825-1865
American Landscape: 1825-1865
This course will explore American landscape painting through an interdisciplinary approach, employing art, literature, religion, and history. In studying the landscape paintings of Thomas Cole, Asher B. Durand, and Frederic Church, we will also consider the commercial growth of New York City; the myths and legends of the Catskill Mountains; the writings of James Fenimore Cooper, Washington Irving, and Henry David Thoreau; the opening of the Erie Canal; and the design and construction of Central Park. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0260A-F17

CRN: 91543

American Disability Studies
American Disability Studies: History, Meanings, and Cultures
In this course we will examine the history, meanings, and realities of disability in the United States. We will analyze the social, political, economic, environmental, and material factors that shape the meanings of "disability," examining changes and continuities over time. Students will draw critical attention to the connections between disability, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, socioeconomic status, and age in American and transnational contexts. Diverse sources, including films and television shows, music, advertising, fiction, memoirs, and material objects, encourage inter and multi-disciplinary approaches to disability. Central themes we consider include language, privilege, community, citizenship, education, medicine and technology, and representation.

AMST0268A-F17

CRN: 92388

Chicago: Texts & Contexts
Chicago: Texts and Contexts
The subject of this course is Chicago. We will study America's so-called "Second City" with an eye to its history and its cultural, political, and economic significance in the development of an "American" ideology and identity. Building on that foundation, we will examine representations of the city across the 20th and 21st centuries comprising a range of media including literature, visual art, film, and television. Looking at work by "outsiders" and "insiders," we will consider the complicated relationship between the actual place and the mythos that has grown up around it. 3 hrs. Lect.

AMST0300A-F17

CRN: 91993

Everglades History and Science
Reclaiming the Swamp: History, Science, and the Challenge of the Everglades
In this course we will survey the cultural and ecological history of the Everglades, starting in the early 19th century and culminating in current restoration efforts. A critically endangered ecosystem, the Everglades illustrates the concept of a “wicked environmental problem”: one characterized by high uncertainty and conflict over values. Following our historical survey of the Everglades, we will shift to a project-based investigation of the local and global forces that shape the region. Course materials will be drawn from fiction, art, historical studies, policy documents, and scientific literature. Students should be prepared to work collaboratively to engage a variety of primary sources. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0312A-F17

CRN: 92230

Disability in Film and TV
Disability in Film and Television
Investigating film and television representations of disability and disabled people, we will understand how these reflect prominent cultural ideas across US history. Various functions of disability in film and TV, and how disabled people have used these media to express their own lived experiences, will be considered. Key themes include: access, stereotype, spectacle, community, and activism. Our intersectional study involves, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, and age. Through readings, screenings, and engaged discussions students will gain insights into ways film and television reflect and shape the understandings of disability in American history and culture. This class includes regular screenings. 3 hrs. lect.

AMST0342A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0342A-F17

CRN: 92407

Literature of American South
Please register via ENAM 0342A
Literature of the American South (AL)
In William Faulkner's Absolom, Absolom! Canadian Shreve McCannon commands his roommate, Mississippian Quentin Compson, "Tell about the South. What's it like there. What do they do there. Why do they live there. Why do they live at all?" Our course will take on writers who want to "tell about the South" in the post-Civil War era and beyond, as they seek to help re-define and revitalize their region. We will focus our regional exploration on the "Southern Renascence," when writers and theorists like the Agrarians re-examined Southern history and reconsidered their role in relation to their regional community. Authors including William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Robert Penn Warren, Eudora Welty, and Tennessee Williams developed a new awareness of the restrictions of racial and gender roles, an interest in literary experimentation, and an increasingly realistic presentation of social conditions in the south. We will consider the legacy of these writers in later 20th century texts by authors such as Flannery O'Connor, Walker Percy, Alice Walker, Cormac McCarthy, Ernest Gaines, Randall Kenan and even relative newcomers such as Jackson Tippett McCrea. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1336) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0345A-F17

CRN: 92256

Black Lives Matter
What political and cultural tactics have black people employed to expose, challenge, and undo state-sanctioned and extrajudicial racial violence against black bodies, and how have those tactics changed over time? In this course we will examine how the emergent #blacklivesmatter movement is distinct from, but in direct conversation with, the long history of movements committed to racial justice in America. We will discuss the discourse of #blacklivesmatter in popular media, and its incorporation of black feminist and queer resistance to social and material structures of power. Interdisciplinary texts may include Marc Lamont Hill’s Nobody: Casualties of America’s War on the Vulnerable, From Ferguson to Flint and Beyond (2016), Dorothy Roberts’ Killing the Black Body (1998), and Ida B. Wells-Barnett’s classic Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All Its Phases (1892). 3 hr. lect.

AMST0358A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0358A-F17

CRN: 92257

Reading Slavery and Abolition
Reading, Slavery, and Abolition
In this course we will study both black and white writers' psychological responses to, and their verbal onslaughts on, the "peculiar institution" of chattel slavery. We will work chronologically and across genres to understand how and by whom the written word was deployed in pursuit of physical and mental freedom and racial and socioeconomic justice. As the course progresses, we will deepen our study of historical context drawing on the substantial resources of Middlebury's special collections, students will have the opportunity to engage in archival work if they wish. Authors will include Emerson, Douglass, Jacobs, Thoreau, Stowe, Walker, and Garrison. 3 hrs. sem. (Diversity)/

AMST0400A-F17

CRN: 90010

Theory and Method
Theory and Method in American Studies (Junior Year)
A reading of influential secondary texts that have defined the field of American Studies during the past fifty years. Particular attention will be paid to the methodologies adopted by American Studies scholars, and the relevance these approaches have for the writing of senior essays and theses. (Open to junior American studies majors only.) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0408A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0408B-F17

CRN: 91086

Am Art In Context:
Art & Life of Winslow Homer
American Art in Context: Art and Life of Winslow Homer
Although generally regarded as a popular painter of American life, Winslow Homer often provides a penetrating and sometimes disturbing view of post-Civil War America. Among the topics to be considered: Homer's paintings of the Civil War; his illustrations of leisure and recreation; and his depictions of women and children in the Gilded Age. During the second half of the course, we will turn our attention to Homer's landscape paintings of the Adirondacks, the Caribbean and the Maine coast, as well as his seascapes of the Gulf Stream and the North Atlantic. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0408B-F17

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0408A-F17

CRN: 92869

Am Art In Context:
Art & Life of Winslow Homer
American Art in Context: Art and Life of Winslow Homer
Although generally regarded as a popular painter of American life, Winslow Homer often provides a penetrating and sometimes disturbing view of post-Civil War America. Among the topics to be considered: Homer's paintings of the Civil War; his illustrations of leisure and recreation; and his depictions of women and children in the Gilded Age. During the second half of the course, we will turn our attention to Homer's landscape paintings of the Adirondacks, the Caribbean and the Maine coast, as well as his seascapes of the Gulf Stream and the North Atlantic. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0500A-F17

CRN: 90077

Independent Study
Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500B-F17

CRN: 90081

Independent Study
Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500C-F17

CRN: 90091

Independent Study
Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500D-F17

CRN: 90092

Independent Study
Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500E-F17

CRN: 90093

Independent Study
Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500F-F17

CRN: 90094

Independent Study
Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500G-F17

CRN: 90095

Independent Study
Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500H-F17

CRN: 90096

Independent Study
Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500I-F17

CRN: 90097

Independent Study
Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500K-F17

CRN: 90099

Independent Study
Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500L-F17

CRN: 90100

Independent Study
Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500M-F17

CRN: 90934

Independent Study
Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500N-F17

CRN: 91061

Independent Study
Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500P-F17

CRN: 92008

Independent Study
Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0705A-F17

CRN: 91320

Senior Research Tutorial
Senior Research Tutorial
This seminar will focus on the development of sophisticated research skills, the sharing with peers of research and writing in progress, and the completion of a substantial research project. Those writing one-credit essays will complete their projects over the course of this tutorial.

Program in American Studies

Axinn Center at Starr Library
15 Old Chapel Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753