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AMST0101A-S13

CRN: 21475

Intro to American Studies

Introduction to American Studies: The Imagination of Disaster
In this course we will offer an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of American culture and identity. Integrating a range of sources and methods, we will examine myths, symbols, values, and social changes that have been used to create and contest ideas of "Americanness." Sources for the course will include movies, fiction, political and religious tracts, advertising, TV shows, music, biography, and architecture. This year, we will focus on the meaning and narration of disaster in American culture, stretching from Puritan fears of God's wrath to contemporary responses to 9/11 and the devastation of Hurricane Katrina. Specific texts will include Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid's Tale; Susan Sontag, The Imagination of Disaster; Cormac McCarthy, The Road; and films such as Irwin Allen's The Towering Inferno and Roland Emmerich's The Day After Tomorrow. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0202A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0202A-S13

CRN: 22305

The American Mind
Please register via HIST 0202A

The American Mind
We will consider the history of influential American ideas, and ideas about America, from the Revolution to the present, with particular regard to changing cultural contexts. A continuing question will be whether such a consensus concept as “the American Mind” has the validity long claimed for it. Among many writers we will read are Thomas Jefferson, Alexis de Tocqueville, William James, Martin Luther King, Betty Friedan, Neil Postman, and Bill McKibben. (Previously taught as HIST/AMST 0426)

AMST0206A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0206A-S13

CRN: 21115

19th Century American Lit.
Please register via ENAM 0206A

Nineteenth-Century American Literature
This course will examine major developments in the literary world of 19th century America. Specific topics to be addressed might include the transition from Romanticism to Regionalism and Realism, the origins and evolution of the novel in the United States, and the tensions arising from the emergence of a commercial marketplace for literature. Attention will also be paid to the rise of women as literary professionals in America and the persistent problematizing of race and slavery. Among others, authors may include J. F. Cooper, Emerson, Melville, Douglass, Chopin, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Hawthorne, Stowe, Alcott, Wharton, and James. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0210A-S13

CRN: 22441

Mod. American Cult. 1830-1919

Formation of Modern American Culture I: 1830-1919
An introduction to the study of American culture from 1830 through World War I with an emphasis on the changing shape of popular, mass, and elite cultural forms. We will explore a widely-accepted scholarly notion that a new, distinctively national and modern culture emerged during this period and that particular ideas of social formation (race, class, gender, sexuality, etc.) came with it. We will practice the interdisciplinary interpretation of American culture by exploring a wide range of subjects and media: economic change, social class, biography and autobiography, politics, photo-journalism, novels, architecture, painting, and photography. Required of all American studies majors. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0216A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0216A-S13

CRN: 21632

Hist of American West
Please register via HIST 0216A

History of the American West
This is a survey of the history of the trans-Mississippi West from colonial contact through the 1980s. It explores how that region became known and understood as the West, and its role and meaning in United States history as a whole. The central themes of this course are conquest and its legacy, especially with regard to the role of the U.S. federal government in the West; human interactions with and perceptions of landscape and environment; social contests among different groups for a right to western resources and over the meanings of western identity; and the role of the West in American popular culture. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. (formerly HIST/AMST 0374)

AMST0216X-S13

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0216X-S13

CRN: 22495

Hist of American West
Please register via HIST 0216X

History of the American West
This is a survey of the history of the trans-Mississippi West from colonial contact through the 1980s. It explores how that region became known and understood as the West, and its role and meaning in United States history as a whole. The central themes of this course are conquest and its legacy, especially with regard to the role of the U.S. federal government in the West; human interactions with and perceptions of landscape and environment; social contests among different groups for a right to western resources and over the meanings of western identity; and the role of the West in American popular culture. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. (formerly HIST/AMST 0374)

AMST0216Y-S13

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0216Y-S13

CRN: 22497

Hist of American West
Please register via HIST 0216Y

History of the American West
This is a survey of the history of the trans-Mississippi West from colonial contact through the 1980s. It explores how that region became known and understood as the West, and its role and meaning in United States history as a whole. The central themes of this course are conquest and its legacy, especially with regard to the role of the U.S. federal government in the West; human interactions with and perceptions of landscape and environment; social contests among different groups for a right to western resources and over the meanings of western identity; and the role of the West in American popular culture. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. (formerly HIST/AMST 0374)

AMST0216Z-S13

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0216Z-S13

CRN: 22499

Hist of American West
Please register via HIST 0216Z

History of the American West
This is a survey of the history of the trans-Mississippi West from colonial contact through the 1980s. It explores how that region became known and understood as the West, and its role and meaning in United States history as a whole. The central themes of this course are conquest and its legacy, especially with regard to the role of the U.S. federal government in the West; human interactions with and perceptions of landscape and environment; social contests among different groups for a right to western resources and over the meanings of western identity; and the role of the West in American popular culture. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. (formerly HIST/AMST 0374)

AMST0224A-S13

CRN: 21974

Race and Ethnicity in the US

Formations of Race and Ethnicity in the U.S.
Historical memories, everyday experiences, and possible futures are powerfully shaped by racial and ethnic differences. Categories of race and ethnicity structure social relationships and cultural meanings in the United States and beyond. In this course we will track the theoretical and historical bases of ideas of race and ethnicity in modern America. We will investigate how race and ethnicity intersect at particular historical moments with other forms of difference including gender, sexuality, nation, and class. The course offers an approach informed by critical studies of race including texts in history, political theory, cultural studies, and anthropology. 3 hrs. lect.

AMST0226A-S13

CRN: 22281

Global American Studies

Global American Studies
The intensification of globalization since the 1980s has transformed the United States and the field of American Studies. In this course we will explore cultural and social changes that are linked to global flows of media, money, and migration in and out of the United States. Contemporary theories of globalization in the humanities and social sciences will be explored through a number of case studies. Some of the themes covered will include: the relationship between globalization and Americanization, imperialism and American militarization, transnationalism and media, and neoliberalism and finance.

AMST0234A-S13

CRN: 22339

American Consumer Culture

American Consumer Culture
For many Americans in the 20th century, consumer goods came to embody the promise of the "good life." Yet mass consumption also fostered economic, political, and social inequalities and engendered anti-consumerist activism. In this course we will pursue an interdisciplinary approach to American consumer culture, focusing on the rise of commercialized leisure and advertising; the role of radio, television, and film in shaping consumer practices; and the relationship of consumerism to social inequality and democratic citizenship. Readings will include works by Veblen, Marcuse, Bordieu, Marchand, Cohen, and Schor. 3 hrs. lect.

AMST0238A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0238A-S13

CRN: 22285

Film Noir
Please register via FMMC 0238A

Film Noir
A series of urban crime films and melodramas made in Hollywood between 1940-1960, but concentrated in the decade immediately after World War II, have been understood by critics to constitute the movement of film noir. In this course we will study prominent films from this group as well as contemporary films influenced by them, and the critical literature they have elicited in order to understand the cultural sources, the stylistic attributes, the social significance, and the long-term influence attributed to film noir. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen.

AMST0252A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0252A-S13

CRN: 22282

African American Literature

African American Literature
This course surveys developments in African American fiction, drama, poetry, and essays during the 20th century. Reading texts in their social, historical, and cultural contexts—and often in conjunction with other African American art forms like music and visual art—we will explore the evolution and deployment of various visions of black being and black artistry, from the Harlem Renaissance through social realism and the Black Arts Movement, to the contemporary post-soul aesthetic. Authors may include Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Gwendolyn Brooks, Ralph Ellison, Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka, Ishmael Reed, Toni Morrison, Charles Johnson, and Octavia Butler. 3 hrs lect./disc.

AMST0277A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0277A-S13

CRN: 21975

Watching the Wire

Urban America & Serial Television: Watching /The Wire/
Frequently hailed as a masterpiece of American television, The Wire shines a light on urban decay in contemporary America, creating a dramatic portrait of Baltimore's police, drug trade, shipping docks, city hall, public schools, and newspapers over five serialized seasons. In this course, we will watch and discuss all of this remarkable-and remarkably entertaining-series, and place it within the dual contexts of contemporary American society and the aesthetics of television. This is a time-intensive course with a focus on close viewing and discussion, and opportunities for critical analysis and research about the show's social contexts and aesthetic practices. (FMMC 0104, FMMC 0236, or AMST 0211) 3 hrs. sem./screen

AMST0308A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0308A-S13

CRN: 22434

Race: Sci, Med. & Diversity

The Power of Race: Science, Medicine, and Human Diversity
In this course, we will explore the manner in which ideologies of race have shaped the histories of science and medicine, and how scientists and medical practitioners have shaped the history of race. Topics will include the role of scientific knowledge in debates about racial slavery in the U.S., eugenics policies in the U.S. and Puerto Rico, tropical medicine in the Philippines, and public health policies in Los Angeles and San Francisco. We will pay particular attention to recent debates regarding the uses of race and genetic ancestry in biomedical research and practice, as well as genetic genealogy. 3 hrs. sem.

AMST0310A-S13

CRN: 22340

Livin' for the City

Livin' for the City
In this course we will engage the idea of the "ghetto" as constructed through literature, film, music, and television. Our exploration will relate this concept to geographic spaces and to a socially-constructed set of ideas about urban African American spaces and communities. We will combine critical textual analysis with fundamental concepts from human geography and social history to explore shifting conceptions of the “ghetto”, consider its impact on urban African American space, and examine how the responses of urban black American artists affect, resist, and change its imaginative geography. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AMST0500A-S13

CRN: 20038

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500B-S13

CRN: 20041

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500C-S13

CRN: 21553

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500D-S13

CRN: 20048

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500E-S13

CRN: 20049

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500F-S13

CRN: 20050

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500G-S13

CRN: 20051

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500H-S13

CRN: 20052

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500I-S13

CRN: 20053

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500J-S13

CRN: 20054

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500K-S13

CRN: 21165

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500L-S13

CRN: 21384

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500M-S13

CRN: 21385

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0500N-S13

CRN: 22611

Independent Study

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST0710A-S13

CRN: 20044

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0705, are eligible for honors and choose qualify to write a two-term, two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710B-S13

CRN: 20055

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0705, are eligible for honors and choose qualify to write a two-term, two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710C-S13

CRN: 21556

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0705, are eligible for honors and choose qualify to write a two-term, two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710D-S13

CRN: 20056

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0705, are eligible for honors and choose qualify to write a two-term, two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710E-S13

CRN: 20058

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0705, are eligible for honors and choose qualify to write a two-term, two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710F-S13

CRN: 20059

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0705, are eligible for honors and choose qualify to write a two-term, two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710G-S13

CRN: 20060

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0705, are eligible for honors and choose qualify to write a two-term, two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710H-S13

CRN: 20061

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0705, are eligible for honors and choose qualify to write a two-term, two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710I-S13

CRN: 20063

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0705, are eligible for honors and choose qualify to write a two-term, two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710J-S13

CRN: 20064

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0705, are eligible for honors and choose qualify to write a two-term, two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

AMST0710M-S13

CRN: 21387

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0705, are eligible for honors and choose qualify to write a two-term, two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)