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Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

ANTH 0103 - Cultural Anthropology      

Diversity and Human Nature: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
This course introduces students to the varieties of human experience in social life and to the differing approaches and levels of analysis used by anthropologists to explain it. Topics include: culture and race, rituals and symbolism, kinship and gender roles, social evolution, political economy, and sociolinguistics. Ethnographic examples are drawn chiefly from non-Western societies, from simple bands to great agrarian states. The ultimate aim is to enable students to think critically about the bases of their own culture and about practices and beliefs previously unanalyzed and unexamined. (formerly SOAN 0103) 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. CMP SOC

Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022

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ANTH 0107 - Introduction to Archaeology      

Introduction to Archaeology
Archaeology is the scientific analysis and interpretation of cultural remains. Archaeologists examine artifacts, architecture, and even human remains in order to answer questions about the growth and development of societies worldwide. In addressing these issues we not only illuminate the past but also explore patterns relevant to contemporary social concerns. From the tropical lowlands of Central America to the deserts of ancient Egypt, this course provides an introduction to world prehistory. We proceed from humanity's earliest beginnings to the development of complex societies worldwide and use case examples to explore the major topics, methods, and theories of contemporary archaeology. (formerly SOAN 0107) 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab. CMP HIS SOC

Fall 2019, Spring 2021, Fall 2021

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ANTH 0109 - Language, Culture, Society      

Language, Culture and Society
In this course students will be introduced to the comparative, ethnographic study of language in relation to socio-cultural context. Our readings will be drawn from diverse global settings and will focus upon language as the means by which people shape and are shaped by the social worlds in which they live. We will examine contrasts in ways of speaking across different communities, personal identities, and institutions. We will explore the consequences of communicative difference across a range of contact situations, including everyday conversation among peers, service encounters, political elections, and global connections or disconnections made possible through new media. (formerly SOAN 0109) 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP SOC

Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Spring 2022

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ANTH 0110 - Current Social Issues in Japan      

Current Social Issues in Japan (in English)
In this course we will use ethnography, fiction, and historical studies to examine some of the underlying themes of Japanese culture. Japan is a highly developed, post-industrial society renowned across the globe for economic success in the post-World War II period. What historical and social factors have shaped Japan’s contemporary culture, and how have interactions with other countries influenced Japanese society? We will study a number of different spheres of Japanese life including the family and the workplace to better understand contemporary society. We will pay special attention to Japan’s global position and its relationship to the United States. (formerly SOAN 0110) 3 hr. lect./disc. AAL NOA SOC

Spring 2020, Fall 2020

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ANTH 0125 - Language Structure & Function      

Language Structure and Function
In this course we will discuss the major issues and findings in the study of human language within theories of modern linguistics, which shares a history with mid-century American anthropology. The main topics include the nature of human language in comparison with other communication systems; sound patterns (phonology); word-formation (morphology); sentence structure (syntax); meaning (semantics); use (pragmatics); language acquisition and socialization. We will also consider language variation and the historical development of languages. Instruction is in English but examples will be drawn from less commonly studied languages around the world. (not open to students who have taken LNGT 0101) 3 hrs. lect. SOC

Spring 2021, Fall 2021

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ANTH 0159 - Intro Biological Anthropology      

Introduction to Biological Anthropology
This course will provide an overview of the field of physical anthropology. The topics to be addressed include the mechanisms of genetics and evolution, human variability and adaptation, our primate relatives and fossil ancestors (hominins), as well as bioarchaeology. Through a combination of lectures and discussions, we will explore human origins and the overall development of the species through time. Likewise, we will look at how language, art, and religion emerge as well as the interplay between environment and biology in human evolution. The course finishes by examining contemporary issues in human biodiversity, from molecular genetics and biotechnology to problematic categories like race, gender, and sexuality. 3 hrs. lect./disc SOC

Fall 2021

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ANTH 0211 - Environmental Anthropology      

Human Ecology
Environmental issues are also cultural and political conflicts, between competing social groups, economic interests and cultural paradigms. This course introduces students to human ecology, the study of how our adaptations to the environment are mediated by cultural differences and political economy. Topics include: how ecological anthropology has evolved as a subdiscipline, with a focus on systems theory and political ecology; how ritually regulated societies manage resources; how rural communities deal with environmental deterioration; and how contradictions between environmental protection, economic development, and cultural values complicate so many ecological issues. (SOAN 0103 or ANTH 0103 or SOAN 0107 or ANTH 0107, or SOAN 0109 or ANTH 0109, or SOAN 0159 or ANTH 0159 or ENVS 0112 or ENVS 0211 or ENVS 0215 or BIOL 0140, or instructor permission) (formerly SOAN 0211) 3 hrs. lect. CMP SOC

Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022

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ANTH 0223 - Andean Civilizations      

Andean Civilizations
Stretching from present-day Ecuador to Chile and consisting of desert coasts, fertile valleys, soaring Andes, and tropical jungle, the Inca Empire was the largest state the Precolumbian Americas had ever seen. Although they claimed to have ‘civilized’ the Andes, the Inka were only the latest in a sequence of complex societies, all of which ultimately fell to the Spanish in the mid-1500s. In this course we will explore the growth and development of social complexity in the region, from the first human occupation of South America to the era of European contact. (formerly SOAN 0223) 3 hrs. lect. AAL AMR CMP SOC

Fall 2019, Fall 2021

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ANTH 0225 - Native North America      

Indigeneity and Colonialism in Native North America
In this course we will approach Native North America and the American political mainstream as dynamically intertwined. Through ethnography, ethno-history, oral literature, and indigenous film we will examine the history of colonial encounters between the Indigenous and the 'Western'. We will examine how indigenous cultural difference and moral claims to land have challenged dominant political cultures across the history of the North American settler states. Our analysis will extend to ongoing questions concerning cultural knowledge, sustainability, and imagined futures. 3 hrs. sem. AMR HIS NOR SOC

Fall 2020

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ANTH 0227 - Aztec Empire/Spanish Conquest      

The Aztec Empire and the Spanish Conquest
This course centers around the rise and fall of the Aztecs, the first state-level society encountered by the Spanish in 1519. Although primarily known today for their military exploits for what today is Mexico, the Aztecs produced great artisans, artists, and philosophers whose contributions endure in contemporary Mexican culture. We will trace the origins and development of Aztec civilization to its encounter with the Spanish in 1519. The course also covers the Spanish background for the Conquest, from the martial and political expulsion of Moors and Jews from the Iberian Peninsula in 1492 to the Spanish Inquisition. (formerly SOAN/HIST 0327) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL AMR CMP HIS SOC

Fall 2020

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ANTH 0228 - The Ancient Maya      

The Rise and Fall of the Ancient Maya
As perhaps the most famous of all of the cultures of Mesoamerica, the Maya are best known for soaring temples, portraits of kings, a complex hieroglyphic writing system, and a dramatic collapse when their ancient kingdoms were abandoned or destroyed. In this course, we will view their accomplishments through the archaeology of the Classic Period (250-850 AD) and examine how the Maya built cities within the tropical jungles of present-day Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador, and Honduras. We will also explore the history of the Maya after the “fall,” from their revival in the post-Classic Period to the present day. (formerly SOAN 0328) 3 hrs. lect./disc AAL AMR SOC

Spring 2021

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ANTH 0230 - Rethinking the Body in Japan      

Rethinking the Body in Contemporary Japan (In English)
In this course we will examine attitudes toward and tensions related to the human body in Japan. Looking at art, music, style, and social issues we will examine the symbolic as well as material concerns of bodies in contemporary Japan. Religious, historical, martial, and aesthetic understandings of bodies will be addressed. We will analyze Japan's current attitudes toward organ transplantation, treatment of the deceased, plastic surgery, surrogacy, sex change surgery and other embodied practices. Readings will include Twice Dead and Commodifying Bodies. (formerly SOAN 0230) 3 hrs. lect./ disc. AAL NOA SOC

Fall 2019

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ANTH 0231 - Everyday Life in South Asia      

Everyday Life in South Asia
This course offers an introduction to anthropological studies of South Asia. Relying on works of ethnography, journalism, memoir, and film, we examine people’s everyday lived experiences and mediations of globalization, religion, science, popular culture, gender, and the body in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Sri Lanka, and Pakistan. In taking a close and intersectional look at situations across the region (e.g., new expressions of gender and capitalism in India, narratives of religious pluralism in Pakistan, enactments of media, modernity, and sexuality in Afghanistan), the course aims to give students the opportunity to sharpen their cultural analysis skills as they glean a more complex understanding of people’s ways of living across South Asia and the diaspora.3 hrs. lect. AAL CMP SOA SOC

Fall 2019, Spring 2022

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ANTH 0232 - Africa and Anthropology      

Africa and Anthropology: Power, Continuity, and Change
Sub-Saharan Africa has long represented primitive mysteries for Europeans and North Americans, as a ‘Dark Continent’ full of exotic people and animals. Even now, many Americans learn little about Africa and Africans except for ‘thin’ media reports of political, economic, and ecological upheaval or persistent poverty, disease, and despair. This course provides a ‘thick’ description and analysis of contemporary African conditions using ethnographies and films. We will not be exploring ‘traditional African cultures’ outside of their historical contexts or generalizing about ‘what African culture really is.’ Rather, our focus will be on understanding social continuity and change alongside cultural diversity and commonality. Topics will include colonialism, critical kinship studies, African feminism, environmental management, witchcraft and religion. Throughout the course African ideas of power – what it is, who has it, and why –unify these diverse topics as social relations. (formerly SOAN 0232) 3 hrs. lect. AAL HIS SAF SOC

Fall 2019, Fall 2020

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ANTH 0241 - Anthro Warfare & Polarization      

The Anthropology of Warfare and Polarization
In this course we will use the anthropology of human evolution, religion and politics to identify the cognitive patterns that justify feuding, warfare, witchcraft, conspiracy theory, and ideological polarization. Beginning with animal behavior and hunting and gathering societies, we will study natural selection for accountability, moralism, and factionalism; how social groups define themselves through mimesis, othering and scapegoating; how scapegoating justifies aggression; how sacrifice and other forms of ritualizing victimhood generate sanctity, sacrilege, and outrage; and how religious and political loyalty tests enforce social boundaries (not open to students who have taken SOAN 0341 or SOAN 0344) 3 hrs. lect./disc. SOC

Fall 2020, Fall 2021

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ANTH 0270 - Anthro of Global Corporations      

Anthropology of Global Corporations
Multinational corporations have become pervasive in the 21st Century global economy. No other social organization matches their ability to increase productivity and multiply wealth. Nor does any other social vehicle match their power to destabilize preexisting relationships. In this course we will learn about the anthropology of exchange and capitalism through ethnographies of corporations, corporate social responsibility, factory production, and financial speculation in the U.S., China, South Africa, and Papua New Guinea. We will also evaluate social-justice critiques of corporate structures: are they meritocracies or exclusionary kin-based networks? Do they build community or merely offload costs? For the final project, students will have the option of doing ethnographic research on a for-profit or not-for-profit enterprise. 3 hours, lct/disc, CMP SOC

Spring 2021

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ANTH 0274 - Global Migration      

The Causes, Dynamics, and Consequences of International Migration
Whether they are asylum seekers, undocumented or legal migrants, large-scale movements of people across international borders raises important questions about human rights, nationality, and place. This global flow also presents unique challenges to both newcomers and residents of the receiving society as both sides contend with issues of loyalty, belonging, and identity. In this course we will examine these important issues using the United States as the primary (though not exclusive) context. Drawing upon historical and contemporary material, we will also discuss the social, cultural, political, and economic consequences of global migration.(formerly SOAN 0274) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR CMP NOR SOC

Fall 2020, Fall 2021

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ANTH 0275 - Cities of Hope and Despair      

Cities of Hope and Despair
Why have some cities outlasted empires and nation states while others exist on the edge of marginality and loss? In this course, we will use historical and contemporary examples to explore the rise and fall of urban centers around the world. What is the meaning of urbanity across cultures? What different purposes do cities serve? What challenges confront them, from climate change to gang warfare to new forms of human precarity? In this course we will also investigate how processes like colonialism, imperialism, and global migration shape the evolution of cities and how they exist in our imaginaries. 3 hrs. lect. CMP SOC

Spring 2021, Spring 2022

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ANTH 0287 - Medical Anthropology      

Medical Anthropology: Approaches to Affliction and Healing
In this course, an introduction to medical anthropology, we will explore cultural and political-economic perspectives on health, illness, and disease. Topics covered include: (1) biocultural approaches to understanding health; (2) medical systems, including biomedicine and others; (3) the effects of poverty and inequality on health outcomes; and (4) the social construction of health and illness. Students will apply these concepts in understanding an aspect of health, illness, or healing in their own research project with an ethnographic component. An introductory course in anthropology or familiarity with medical or public health issues is recommended. (formerly SOAN 0387) 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP SOC

Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Fall 2021

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ANTH 0302 - Ethnographic Research      

The Research Process: Ethnography and Qualitative Methods
The aim of this course is to prepare the student to conduct research, to analyze and present research in a scholarly manner, and to evaluate critically the research of others. Practice and evaluation of such basic techniques as observation, participant-observation, structured and open-ended interviews, and use of documents. Introduction to various methodological and theoretical frameworks. Thesis or essay prospectus is the final product of this course. Strongly recommended for juniors. Three-hour research lab required. (SOAN 0103 or ANTH 0103 or SOAN 0105 or SOCI 0105) (formerly SOAN 0302) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. research lab SOC

Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2021

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ANTH 0304 - Gender, Culture, and Power      

Gender, Culture, and Power
This course offers a cross-cultural introduction to the issues involved in the study of women and gender. Such an endeavor raises a number of difficult and delicate issues. What explains the diversities and similarities in women's roles across societies? How do we assess women's status and power, and how do we decide which standards to use in doing so? What forces create changes in women's roles? What is the relationship between gender constructions and the nature of communities, economies, and even nations? Our analysis will concentrate on three primary domains: family and kinship, symbolic systems, and political economy. Course readings will focus primarily on non-Western societies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (National/Transnational Feminisms)/ AAL CMP SOC

Fall 2020

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ANTH 0306 - Topics Anthropology Theory      

Topics in Anthropological Theory
This course gives an introduction to some important themes in the development of anthropological thought, primarily in the past century in anglophone and francophone traditions. It emphasizes close comparative reading of selections from influential texts by authors who have shaped recent discourse within the social sciences. (SOAN 0103 or ANTH 0103 or SOAN 0107 or SOCI 0107 or SOAN 0109 or ANTH 0109 or SOAN 0159 or ANTH 0159) (formerly SOAN 0306) 3 hrs. lect. SOC

Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022

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ANTH 0308 - Gender, Technology & Future      

Gender, Technology, and the Future
Can technology make the world more just and equitable? Scientific and technological inventions continually surprise us with visions of the future that promise an end to global inequality and injustice: cooking robots, microcredit apps, test–tube babies. We will center these powerful ideas to unpack how they galvanize raced and sexed bodies to articulate the future. Through an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of science and technology studies we will ask how technological imaginations and interventions invent new global futures, examine their impact and implications, and explore the possibilities for new technological horizons.3 hrs. sem. SOC

Spring 2020

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ANTH 0324 - Ladies at Work      

Ladies at Work: Global Politics of Care, Kinship, and Affect
Why are some forms of work valued more than others? When did people start believing entrepreneurs and innovators when they say, we should “Do What You Love”? Is work life separate from life at home and with friends? This class will journey across global care chains, drawing on feminist writings and ethnographic texts to examine conditions structuring middle class housework in the U.S., garment manufacturing in Sri Lankan factories, call center work in the Philippines, and elite startup innovations in India. Engaging questions of class, race, gender, and heterosexuality, we will learn about forms of feminized work and consider more just alternatives. 3 hrs. sem. AAL SOA SOC

Fall 2019

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ANTH 0330 - Global Japanese Culture      

Global Japanese Culture - In English
In this course we will examine the transformation of Japanese cultural identity (Japanese-ness) as products, ideas, and people move across the borders in and out of Japan. Social scientists have been particularly interested in the Japanizing of non-Japanese practices and products such as hip hop and hamburgers, as well as the popularity of Japanese styles and products on the global scene. We will take an anthropological approach using texts such as Millennial Monsters, Remade in Japan, and Hip Hop Japan to examine the issues of cultural hybridity, identity, and globalization. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL CMP SOC

Spring 2022

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ANTH 0335 - The Anthropology of China      

The Anthropology of China
China serves as a case study in the anthropological analysis of a complex rapidly changing non-Western society. This course will be a survey of the principal institutions and ideas that form the background to modern Chinese society. Areas covered include: family and kinship, ritual, transformations of class hierarchies, and the impact of globalization. Materials will be drawn from descriptions of traditional, contemporary (including both mainland and Taiwanese settings), and overseas contexts. (formerly SOAN 0335) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL HIS NOA SOC

Spring 2021

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ANTH 0337 - Love, Sex, and Marriage      

Love, Sex, and Marriage
What are the social terms for sexual agency in countries around the world? How is marriage understood through idealizations of romance as well as familial expectations of duty or status? In this course we consider how other cultures’ views on love, sex, and partnership are made legible and illegible within broader cultural, moral, and state interests. The course asks for in-depth participation, short weekly writings, and a longer final paper that each engage ethnographic works on a range of topics, from critical studies of love and globalization to queer kinmaking, rituals of the ‘lavish wedding,’ and everyday ways of hooking up and breaking up online. 3 hrs. lect. CMP SOC

Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022

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ANTH 0340 - The Traveling Tonic      

The Traveling Tonic: Geographies of Medicine, Science, and the Body
Medical practice does not operate within bounded systems but moves in highly transactional and molten ways—from the circulation of classical Chinese and Indian manuscripts to transnational movements of genes, gametes, and drugs. In this seminar we draw on ethnographic examples to grasp the importance of migration in producing science. The metaphor of travel enables us to pivot from Eurocentric histories of science to disrupt what we mean by global medicine. At the same time, the figure of the tonic enables us to think about the many sorts of life (plants, distillates, vectors, etc.) that make up medicine today. (ANTH 0287) 3 hrs. sem. SOC

Spring 2021

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ANTH 0345 - Anthropology of Food      

The Anthropology of Food
Food not only sustains bodies, but also reflects and shapes cultures, social identities, and systems of power. In this course we examine the relationship between food and culture. Beginning with an examination of the origins of cooking, we will go on to analyze a variety of approaches to understanding the food/culture/society relationship. These include the symbolic meanings of food, the role of food in constructing social and cultural identities, and the relationship between food and political and economic systems. Our examples will be cross-cultural (Africa, South and East Asia, Europe, and the Americas). 3 hrs. sem. AAL CMP SOC

Spring 2021, Spring 2022

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ANTH 0351 - Education and Social Policy      

Education and Social Policy
School choice programs like charter and magnet schools are dramatically altering the educational landscape in the United States. In this course we will examine the premise that we can overcome the challenges of children living in poor neighborhoods by severing the traditional link between neighborhoods and schools and by providing access to extralocal high-quality schools. But who gets to exercise such choice? Does school choice result in better educational outcomes? We will also explore the relationship between school and neighborhood inequality. How do these two contexts work together to reproduce, intensify, or ameliorate spatial and educational inequities? (formerly SOAN/SOCI 0351) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR NOR SOC

Fall 2020

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ANTH 0355 - Race Ethnicity Across Cultures      

Race and Ethnicity Across Cultures
Ethnicity and race are social phenomena that influence group relations, as well as personal identity, in many areas of the world. But what is "ethnicity" and what is "race"? In this course we will explore the varied approaches that have been utilized to understand race and ethnicity across diverse cultural settings. No single explanation of race and ethnicity is all encompassing, and so we will explore a number of different approaches. Among the issues we will examine are: alternative explanations of ethnic and racial identity formation; the causes and consequences of ethnic violence and competition; the connections among ethnicity, gender, and class; and the processes through which distinctions between self and other are created. (formerly SOAN 0355) 3 hrs. lect./disc CMP SOC

Fall 2019, Fall 2021

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ANTH 0357 - Death and the Body      

Death and the Body
This course will provide an overview of how archaeologists and anthropologists encounter and interpret death in societies worldwide. We will look at death and the body from the perspective of burials and tombs, discussing ancient and modern conceptions of souls, afterlives, and identities. Drawing upon my own research in the tropical lowlands of Guatemala and Honduras, we will compare Maya attitudes towards death with those of other world societies, from the mummies of ancient Egypt to modern jazz funerals in New Orleans. We will explore different ideas about death, social boundaries, and even what it is to be human. 3 hrs. lect. AAL AMR CMP SOC

Fall 2020

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ANTH 0375 - International Education      

International and Cross Cultural Education
Who gets to own knowledge? Who can acquire it? How do we construct advantage and disadvantage? Comparative and international education examines the intersection of culture and education and the ways they are inextricably related through history, politics, and literature. In this course we will explore major concepts, trends, and methodologies across disciplines, focusing on the effects of globalization, the maintenance and dissolution of borders, the commodification of knowledge, the social creation of meaning, and the consequences of those constructions. We will examine global educational traditions and realities on the ground in case studies of Western and developing nations. CMP SOC

Spring 2021

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ANTH 0385 - Global Political Ecology      

Global Political Ecology
From global land grabs and agrarian revolutionary movements to clashes over energy infrastructure and the establishment of protected areas, today’s “environmental issues” are suffused with political relations and deeply entangled with the historical formations of capitalism, colonialism, the state, and science. In this seminar we will analyze how “social” questions of power, political economy, and social struggle, pervade the “natural” (and vice versa). Such questions are invariably messy and full of surprises, confounding reduction to universal theories extended from afar. Often, they require a close in-the-weeds look. That is what this class will invite you to do. The field of political ecology offers a rich repertoire of approaches for developing empirically grounded, historically contextualized, and theoretically nuanced forms of analysis that grapple with the situated complexities of resource and environmental issues. (ENVS 0208 or ENVS 0211 or PSCI 0214) 3 hrs. sem CMP SOC

Spring 2021

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ANTH 0395 - Environmental Communication      

Environmental Communication
Do languages simply put different labels on the environment, from rocks to trees to carbon, or are what we see and what we value shaped by the ways that we talk about it? Drawing upon ethnography, linguistics, and critical discourse analysis, we will explore how environmental perceptions and modes of action are formed in and through language. We will bring an appreciation of language differences to the analysis of ongoing environmental controversies, where the various stakeholders draw contrasting boundaries between nature and culture and define human involvement with nature in different ways. (formerly SOAN 0395) 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP SOC

Spring 2020, Spring 2021

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ANTH 0396 - Linguistic Anthropology Method      

Linguistic Anthropology Methods
In this course we will work with a method and theory known as the “ethnography of communication” to examine language use in socio-cultural context. Students will learn to form research questions and collect different kinds of data, including everyday spoken interactions, archival print sources, and social media. Students will learn how to document, annotate, and analyze their samples as speech events linked to broader discursive contexts and social relations. Students will also turn ethnography of communication upon social science research itself, examining interviews and surveys as communicative interactions. The course provides an empirical pathway to questions of cultural difference and social inequality. (formerly SOAN 0396) 3 hrs. sem. SOC

Fall 2019, Fall 2021

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ANTH 0410 - Sorcery in Mesoamerica      

Sorcery in Mesoamerica
Sorcery was fundamental to religious life in ancient Mesoamerica. Though removed from one another in time and space, the different cultures and civilizations of this region practiced magic and witchcraft. Civilizations like the Aztecs (1300-1521 CE), the Classic Maya (250-850 CE) and the Olmecs (1200-400 BCE) flourished in different environments, spoke unrelated languages, and worshipped separate gods; however, they were all fascinated by the occult. This course compares their magical traditions from a variety of viewpoints, including analytical, anthropological, and historical perspectives. It also considers the impact of European witchcraft on Mesoamerica, from the Colonial Period to the present.3 hrs. sem. AMR CMP CW NOR PHL SOC

Spring 2022

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ANTH 0450 - Anthropology of Development      

Anthropology of Development
Is development about growing an economy or fostering justice? This course investigates efforts to alleviate poverty and build sustainable communities. Why do so many development interventions fail? Anthropologists show how aid projects are often undermined by structural, institutional, and cultural hierarchies. In this course we will examine the history of state-led and NGO development strategies and the role of anthropology in development design and evaluation. Our study of what ‘does not work’ will contrast with ‘what does’ by asking the critical social question of ‘for whom.’ Students will learn to write and present policy briefs, project proposals, and program evaluations. 3 hrs. sem. SOC

Fall 2020

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ANTH 0492 - Archaeology Method & Theory      

Archaeological Method and Theory
Archaeology is more than just excavation. It is interpretation. As a discipline, archaeology relies upon different methods and theories in order to 'read' human prehistory from the remains of past societies. In this seminar we will survey archaeological methods and theories, with an emphasis on field techniques and the intellectual history of the discipline. We will explore the problems archaeologists face when confronted with incomplete data, the ways in which sites are researched and excavated, and the complex ethical issues that arise from simply asking the question, "who owns the past?" As a result, in this seminar we will look behind the intellectual curtain, where past societies are revealed, interpreted, and even contested. (formerly SOAN 0492) 3 hrs. sem. PHL SOC

Spring 2020

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ANTH 0500 - Advanced Individual Study      

Prior to registering for ANTH 0500, a student must enlist the support of a faculty advisor from the Department of Anthropology. (Open to Majors only) (Approval Required)

Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022

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ANTH 0700 - One-Semester Senior Project      

One-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a student will carry out an independent, one-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 25-40 pages, due the last day of classes.

Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022

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ANTH 0710 - Multi-Semester Senior Project      

Multi-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a senior will carry out an independent multi-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 60-100 pages, due either at the end of the Winter Term or the Friday after spring break.

Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022

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ANTH 1026 - The Roaring Twenties      

The Roaring Twenties
What will relationships look like at Middlebury and beyond, post-pandemic? Drawing on fiction, film, theory, and art, we will produce a collaborative exhibit on American sex and sociality in the 2020s. Our goal will be to depict the ideas and desires of Gen Zers, a generation more racially diverse, gender fluid, and well-educated than older Americans but facing higher social and economic uncertainty. What do Gen Z dreams and concerns look like in the context of #MeToo, BLM, and other movements? This course will be a place to study and understand shifts in dating, sex, solidarity, and citizenship—what those shifts are, and what they could be. SOC WTR

Winter 2022

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ANTH 1034 - Skull Wars      

Skull Wars: Sordid True Tales of Rapacity, Revenge, and Racism in the Search for Human Origins
Jane Goodall and Dian Fossey. Richard Leakey and Don Johanson. Lee Berger and Tim White. In this course we will examine how jealousy, competition, and racism drive knowledge production and sabotage in the hunt for human ancestors. We’ll do so by exploring how these personalities, and others, have leveraged the media, from the New York Times to National Geographic, to push forward their vision and status in science. Through scientific articles, popular books, and film, we will also explore how settler colonialism and racism have plagued, and continue to plague, the science of paleoanthropology. SOC WTR

Winter 2021

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ANTH 1035 - Anthro of Labor Migra & Refuge      

Refugees or Labor Migrants: The Anthropology of South-North Migration
More people from low-income countries are seeking to move to high-income countries.  How many are refugees fleeing oppression, and how many are labor migrants seeking to increase their incomes and consumption levels? Do they have a human right to be admitted? Beefed-up border enforcement has led to thousands of deaths in the American Southwest and the Mediterranean, and now anxious voters are electing politicians who promise even harsher crackdowns. Based on research with international migration streams, this course will explore debates over border enforcement, migrant rights, the deportation industry and the migration industry, low-wage labor markets, and remittance economies, with a focus on Latin American migration to the U.S., as well as African and Mideastern migration to Europe (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1287 or SOAN 1021 or SOAN 329 or ANTH 0329) AAL AMR CMP SOC WTR

Winter 2021

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ANTH 1040 - School Lunches      

School Lunches
In this course we will chew through critical analysis on the production and consumption of school lunches. We will examine how diverse actors—state and national governments, big corporations, food service companies, celebrity chefs, community activists, and concerned parents—battle over what lands on the cafeteria tray. Using readings from the social sciences as well as food documentaries, we will explore how initiatives like school gardens and cooking classes shape child development and socialization. The laboratory component of this class will look beyond the U.S. context by making and eating meals served up to students around the world. Food preparation and consumption practices will be adjusted, as necessary, to comply with COVID restriction guidelines. WTR

Winter 2022

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ANTH 1224 - Communities in Global Health      

Empowerment or Exploitation? Engaging Communities in the Pursuit of Better Health
Sustained progress in global health and development requires the participation of target communities. Vaccines, for instance, will themselves do no good if caregivers refuse to vaccinate their children. In this course, we will explore the role of communities in the pursuit of improved health – a state often pre-defined by outsiders without direct community consultation. The course will focus specifically on the evolving role of community health workers within global health and development agendas, emphasizing therein the fine line we tread (as global health policy makers, implementers, and donors) between empowering and exploiting the communities on whose participation our success relies. (not open to students who have taken INTD 1224) SOC WTR

Winter 2021, Winter 2022

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ANTH 2322 - Introduction to the Maghreb      

Introduction to the Maghreb: Culture, History and Society
The Maghreb (the “farthest west” in Arabic)—encompassing Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya—has been an important crossroads throughout history, serving as a connection between Africa, Asia, and Europe. In recent years, the region has become a center of interest not just for specialists but for also for the general, educated public. This course serves as a general introductory overview of the Maghreb and offers students the opportunity to familiarize themselves with the historical, cultural, and social processes that have affected and transformed the region. Students will be also introduced to some of the important pressing cultural and social issues in the region as well as to various forms of literary and artistic expression. Important topics include the role of colonial powers in the region, postcolonial Maghrebian societies and nation states, the impact of the Cold War, the political systems in the region, religion in the Maghreb, social movements for democracy, literature and arts in the Maghreb, educational systems, gender relations and family, food and drink, sports and media. MDE SOC

Spring 2021

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ANTH 2360 - Indigenous Peoples&Glbl Pandem      

Sustainability, indigenous peoples and global pandemics: What have we learned so far?
This class will examine the links between indigenous knowledge, environmental management and the lessons derived from the effects of massive catastrophic events on the ideal of sustainability in our society. In this new pandemic context, ensuring the needs of the present without compromising the needs of future generations can lead to unexpected results. Although numerous pandemics have occurred throughout human history, causing important transformations in the relationship between our natural and social environment, the affected geographic has never been this large scale before. Currently, we are trying to adapt to new environmental and social, economic, and political relationships whose scope we do not know until now. Within this framework, indigenous peoples can pass on their own lifetime experiences to us, as well as the lessons they have accumulated, especially about their relationships with natural resources and the environment. AMR SOC

Spring 2021

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SOAN 0103 - Topics in Sociocultural Anthro      

Selected Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology
This course introduces students to the varieties of human experience in social life and to the differing approaches and levels of analysis used by anthropologists to explain it. Topics include: culture and race, rituals and symbolism, kinship and gender roles, social evolution, political economy, and sociolinguistics. Ethnographic examples are drawn chiefly from non-Western societies, from simple bands to great agrarian states. The ultimate aim is to enable students to think critically about the bases of their own culture and about practices and beliefs previously unanalyzed and unexamined. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc./2 hrs. screen (Anthropology) CMP SOC

Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019

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SOAN 0105 - Society and the Individual      

Society and the Individual
This course examines the ideas and enduring contributions of the giants of modern social theory, including Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, and Sigmund Freud. Readings will include selections from original works, as well as contemporary essays. Key issues will include the nature of modernity, the direction of social change, and the role of human agency in constructing the "good society." This course serves as a general introduction to sociology. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology) SOC

Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019

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SOAN 0107 - Introduction to Archaeology      

Introduction to Archaeology
Archaeology is the scientific analysis and interpretation of cultural remains. Archaeologists examine artifacts, architecture, and even human remains in order to answer questions about the growth and development of societies worldwide. In addressing these issues we not only illuminate the past but also explore patterns relevant to contemporary social concerns. From the tropical lowlands of Central America to the deserts of ancient Egypt, this course provides an introduction to world prehistory. We proceed from humanity's earliest beginnings to the development of complex societies worldwide and use case examples to explore the major topics, methods, and theories of contemporary archaeology. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab. (Anthropology) CMP HIS SOC

Spring 2018, Fall 2018

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SOAN 0109 - Language, Culture, Society      

Language, Culture and Society
In this course students will be introduced to the comparative, ethnographic study of language in relation to socio-cultural context. Our readings will be drawn from diverse global settings and will focus upon language as the means by which people shape and are shaped by the social worlds in which they live. We will examine contrasts in ways of speaking across different communities, personal identities, and institutions. We will explore the consequences of communicative difference across a range of contact situations, including everyday conversation among peers, service encounters, political elections, and global connections or disconnections made possible through new media. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)/ CMP SOC

Spring 2018, Spring 2019

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SOAN 0110 - Current Social Issues in Japan      

Current Social Issues in Japan (in English)
In this course we will use ethnography, fiction, and historical studies to examine some of the underlying themes of Japanese culture. Japan is a highly developed, post-industrial society renowned across the globe for economic success in the post-World War II period. What historical and social factors have shaped Japan’s contemporary culture, and how have interactions with other countries influenced Japanese society? We will study a number of different spheres of Japanese life including the family and the workplace to better understand contemporary society. We will pay special attention to Japan’s global position and its relationship to the United States. 3 hr. lect./disc. (Anthropology) AAL NOA SOC

Fall 2017

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SOAN 0159 - Intro Biological Anthropology      

Introduction to Biological Anthropology
This course will provide an overview of the field of physical anthropology. The topics to be addressed include the mechanisms of genetics and evolution, human variability and adaptation, our primate relatives and fossil ancestors (hominins), as well as bioarchaeology. Through a combination of lectures and discussions, we will explore human origins and the overall development of the species through time. Likewise, we will look at how language, art, and religion emerge as well as the interplay between environment and biology in human evolution. The course finishes by examining contemporary issues in human biodiversity, from molecular genetics and biotechnology to problematic categories like race, gender, and sexuality. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology) SOC

Spring 2019

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SOAN 0191 - Gender and the Body      

Gender and the Body
What is your gender and how do you know? In order to answer this question, we need to consider how gender is known through biology, psychology, consumer capitalism, and our everyday embodiment. We will also look at how the meaning and performance of gender have changed over time from Classical Greece to Victorian England to the contemporary U.S. Throughout, we will consider how gender does not operate along, but is always entangled with, race, class, sexuality, nationality, and ability. 3 hrs. lect. CMP SOC

Fall 2017, Fall 2018

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SOAN 0201 - Sociology of Labor      

Sociology of Labor
In this class we will survey the sociological literature on labor and labor movements in America and around the world. We will raise questions related to the organization and transformation of work, the making of class society, trade unionism and other class-based organizing, and the impact of globalization on labor organizations. Exploration of these key themes will happen through an analysis of classic and contemporary texts, as well as fiction and film. This is a seminar-style course with opportunities for students to lead class discussions and debates. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology) SOC

Spring 2018, Spring 2019

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SOAN 0202 - Intro Women's Resistance      

Introduction to Women’s Resistance
Students will explore core themes and tensions in women’s resistance. How do we define women, and how do women define themselves? How do we conceive of resistance? What do women seek to change through their activism? How do they organize collectively? What has influenced their successes, and their failures? We will focus on women’s resistance in the United States, but we will examine forms of struggle that are linked globally. Topics include abolition, women’s suffrage, women’s liberation, civil rights, environmental movements, reproductive justice, environmental justice, Black Lives Matter, first food justice, #metoo, transgender rights, and human rights. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Spring 2019

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SOAN 0211 - Environmental Anthropology      

Human Ecology
Environmental issues are also cultural and political conflicts, between competing social groups, economic interests and cultural paradigms. This course introduces students to human ecology, the study of how our adaptations to the environment are mediated by cultural differences and political economy. Topics include: how ecological anthropology has evolved as a subdiscipline, with a focus on systems theory and political ecology; how ritually regulated societies manage resources; how rural communities deal with environmental deterioration; and how contradictions between environmental protection, economic development, and cultural values complicate so many ecological issues. (SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105 or ENVS 0112 or ENVS 0211 or ENVS 0215 or BIOL 0140) 3 hrs. lect. (Anthropology) CMP SOC

Spring 2018, Spring 2019

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SOAN 0212 - Family in Contemporary Society      

The Family in Contemporary Society
This course will investigate the social, economic, and political forces that have brought about changes in family life in the beginning of the 21st century. We will begin by looking at various attempts to define "the family," and we will then explore a range of topics, including the webs of family relationships (e.g., mothering, fathering, kin networks), labor and family intersections (e.g., mediating between work and family; the household division of labor), gay and lesbian family life, and domestic violence. Although the focus will be on contemporary United States, we will also examine some cross-cultural and historical material. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology) AMR CMP NOR SOC

Fall 2017

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SOAN 0215 - Sociology of Education      

Sociology of Education
In this course we will study education both as a social institution and as a social process. In our analysis of education and its relationship to the structure of society, we will pay particular attention to the intersection of gender, class, race, and ethnicity within schools. Our objective will be to explore the ways in which education might contribute to the reproduction of social inequalities, as well as its potential for social change. The substantive focus will be on American society. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology) AMR CMP NOR SOC

Fall 2017, Fall 2018

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SOAN 0218 - Sociology of Sport      

Sociology of Sport
In this course we will explore sport-related issues and sport-society issues from a sociological perspective. Through lectures, films, class discussions, and student presentations we will examine the roles of sport within contemporary social systems, and ways in which sport reflects and enhances individual, collective, and national agendas and identities. We will also critically analyze various topics, including violence, cheating, and technology while focusing on “mega sporting events,” the media, and eSport. Additionally, by using sport as a lens to examine class, gender, and race we will illuminate the manners in which sport is entangled in socio-cultural, political, and economic forces. 3 hrs. lect. SOC

Spring 2019

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SOAN 0225 - Native North America      

Indigeneity and Colonialism in Native North America
In this course we will approach Native North America and the American political mainstream as dynamically intertwined. Through ethnography, ethno-history, oral literature, and indigenous film we will examine the history of colonial encounters between the Indigenous and the 'Western'. We will examine how indigenous cultural difference and moral claims to land have challenged dominant political cultures across the history of the North American settler states. Our analysis will extend to ongoing questions concerning cultural knowledge, sustainability, and imagined futures. 3 hrs. sem. (Anthropology) AMR HIS NOR SOC

Fall 2018

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SOAN 0230 - Rethinking the Body in Japan      

Rethinking the Body in Contemporary Japan (In English)
In this course we will examine attitudes toward and tensions related to the human body in Japan. Looking at art, music, style, and social issues we will examine the symbolic as well as material concerns of bodies in contemporary Japan. Religious, historical, martial, and aesthetic understandings of bodies will be addressed. We will analyze Japan's current attitudes toward organ transplantation, treatment of the deceased, plastic surgery, surrogacy, sex change surgery and other embodied practices. Readings will include Twice Dead and Commodifying Bodies. 3 hrs. lect./ disc. (Anthropology) AAL NOA SOC

Spring 2018

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SOAN 0232 - Africa and Anthropology      

Africa and Anthropology: Power, Continuity, and Change
Sub-Saharan Africa has long represented primitive mysteries for Europeans and North Americans, as a ‘Dark Continent’ full of exotic people and animals. Even now, many Americans learn little about Africa and Africans except for ‘thin’ media reports of political, economic, and ecological upheaval or persistent poverty, disease, and despair. This course provides a ‘thick’ description and analysis of contemporary African conditions using ethnographies and films. We will not be exploring ‘traditional African cultures’ outside of their historical contexts or generalizing about ‘what African culture really is.’ Rather, our focus will be on understanding social continuity and change alongside cultural diversity and commonality. Topics will include colonialism, critical kinship studies, African feminism, environmental management, witchcraft and religion. Throughout the course African ideas of power – what it is, who has it, and why –unify these diverse topics as social relations. (Anthropology)/ AAL SAF SOC

Fall 2017, Fall 2018

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SOAN 0234 - Contemporary Israel      

State and Society in Contemporary Israel
In this course we will examine Israeli society and politics in a period of rapid and profound transformation. We will begin with an introductory unit on Zionism, Palestinian nationalism, and the history of the state. Subsequent units will examine the social, cultural, and political characteristics of Israel’s main population sectors and religious groupings. The final units will examine ongoing political struggles, including struggles over the role of religion in public life; civil rights and democracy; and West Bank settlements and the Palestinian-Israeli peace process. Most readings assignments will be social scientific in nature but will also include journalism and literature. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology) AAL MDE SOC

Spring 2019

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SOAN 0235 - The City and Its People      

The City and Its People
We all live somewhere, and increasingly we find ourselves living in an urban environment. In this course we will explore current topics in urban sociology, with particular emphasis on the power of place, culture, and community in U.S. cities. We will study the historical, cultural, and political conditions that have shaped contemporary U.S. cities, such as New York City, Chicago, and Los Angeles. We will examine how cities change and resist change through the lens of such subjects as migration, poverty, urban arts, crime, and education as it pertains to the city. Students will read a variety of ethnographic and sociological materials, in order to gain an understanding of the complexities of both urban life and processes of representation. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Sociology) AMR NOR SOC

Spring 2018, Fall 2018

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SOAN 0236 - Sociology of Food      

Sociology of Food
Using a systems approach, we will critically explore sociological perspectives and methods to analyze the social organization and dynamics of local, regional, national, and global agri-food systems. We will examine commonalities and differences of food systems between communities, places, regions, and nation-states. We will explore theoretical and empirical problems, using literature from different disciplines (such as rural sociology, anthropology, food and environmental studies, ecology, and other interrelated disciplines). By critically examining a final case study, students will learn both theoretical and practical implications of human dimensions in current agri-food systems. (Sociology) SOC

Fall 2018

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SOAN 0238 - Visual Sociology      

Visual Sociology
We live in a visual world. To understand society and culture, we must understand the images we produce and consume. This course provides a sociological lens to study how we use and are used by images. We will study key theories that frame how visual contents (such as photographs, films, and videos) are shared, viewed, and interpreted by various audiences. Using images as our starting point, we will analyze the messages and imagery in visual texts to extract their social meanings. We will engage three sides of visual sociology: images as cultural artifacts, picture making as data collection, and displaying research visually. (Sociology) (Juniors and Seniors by permission only) 3 hrs. lect. SOC

Spring 2019

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SOAN 0240 - Inequality &American Dream      

Inequality and the American Dream
In this course we will explore sociological attempts to explain who “gets ahead” in the contemporary United States. We will discuss two distinct issues that are often conflated in public discussions: economic inequality and social mobility. We will consider the conceptual and empirical associations between these measures, how each has changed over time, how the United States compares to other countries, and how different social environments (such as colleges, neighborhoods, and families) influence life chances within and across generations. We will also examine the challenges of producing research about these topics, focusing on both theoretical and methodological issues. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR NOR SOC

Spring 2018

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SOAN 0245 - Social Life in Age of Big Data      

Social Life in an Age of Big Data
Until recently, quantitative social science relied on surveys or official statistics. Today, sociologists may link social media profiles to census records or student loan statements. In this course, we will consider some of the insights that such sources and methods of "Big Data" reveal about society. We will also critically examine the ethical dilemmas and cultural consequences of living in a world where many of our actions and interactions can be turned into data. Readings, discussions and occasional applied exercises will introduce students to core sociological topics and develop the tools to consume and engage quantitative social science research. 3 hrs. lect. DED SOC

Fall 2017, Fall 2018

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SOAN 0252 - Social Psychology in Sociology      

Social Psychology in Sociology
The purpose of this course is to examine the relationship between self and society from a sociological perspective. Our initial focus will on the nature of symbols, language, and the social self as theorized by G. H. Mead and early "symbolic interactionists." We will then address the presentation of self through the works of Erving Goffman, and subsequently consider more contemporary concerns, such as emotions, emotional labor, and inequality in social interaction. The second half of the course will address questions of identity and debates surrounding the emergence of "postmodern" selves. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology) SOC

Spring 2018, Spring 2019

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SOAN 0254 - Right/Ritual:Israel &Neighbors      

Rites and Rituals: Israel and its Neighbors
In this course we will use theory and case studies, from Israel and its neighbors, to explore a wide range of rituals. We will examine national goals achieved with the assistance of ceremonies, and society’s imprint on its members through life-cycle rituals. We will address similarities and differences in the ways specific rituals are performed, and the diverse meanings they may hold for groups and individuals in geographically proximate yet culturally distinct countries, and in the heterogeneous Israeli society. Our aim is to analyze cultural repertoires and social relations, as are represented, reproduced, and contested in ritualistic activities. 3 hrs. lect. CMP SOC

Fall 2018

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SOAN 0267 - Global Health      

Global Health
This course provides an introductory survey of the basic issues and initiatives in contemporary global public health, including in-depth case studies of public health projects in locales including Haiti, Venezuela, Brazil, Rwanda, and Pakistan. We will explore the political, socioeconomic, and cultural complexity of health problems, and critically examine the structure and methods of global public health institutions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology) AAL CMP SOC

Spring 2018

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SOAN 0274 - Global Migration      

Global Flows: The Causes, Dynamics, and Consequences of International Migration
Whether they are asylum seekers, undocumented or legal migrants, large-scale movements of people across international borders raises important questions about human rights, nationality, and place. This global flow also presents unique challenges to both newcomers and residents of the receiving society as both sides contend with issues of loyalty, belonging, and identity. In this course we will examine these important issues using the United States as the primary (though not exclusive) context. Drawing upon historical and contemporary material, we will also discuss the social, cultural, political, and economic consequences of global migration. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Sociology) AMR NOR SOC

Spring 2018, Spring 2019

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SOAN 0286 - Global Contemporary Dance      

Global Contemporary Dance
In this seminar we will ask what dancing “locally” signifies in a global world and what coheres – across multiple dance practices, performances and intercultural collaborations – in the category of “contemporary dance.” Through ethnographic research and expository and embodied activities we will explore dance as a complex site of cultural negotiation and contestation, challenging binaries between Western and non-Western movement traditions. With a focus on Asia, Latin America, Africa and the Middle East, we will trace how dance flows transnationally across varied political economies; contributes to the formation of ethnic, racial, gendered, national and (post) colonial identities; and complicates notions of cultural “authenticity.” (No previous dance experience required)
3 hrs. lect/disc. AAL ART CMP SOC

Spring 2018

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SOAN 0301 - Soc Research Methods      

The Logic of Sociological Inquiry
In this course students will be introduced to the basic tools of sociological research including problem formulation, strategies of design and data collection, and analysis and presentation of results. This class will help students formulate a research question and develop a research strategy to best explore that question. Those strategies may include interviews, structured observation, participant observation, content analysis, and surveys. This class, strongly recommended for juniors, will culminate in the submission of a senior project proposal. (SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Sociology) CW SOC

Spring 2018, Spring 2019

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SOAN 0302 - Ethnographic Research      

The Research Process: Ethnography and Qualitative Methods
The aim of this course is to prepare the student to conduct research, to analyze and present research in a scholarly manner, and to evaluate critically the research of others. Practice and evaluation of such basic techniques as observation, participant-observation, structured and open-ended interviews, and use of documents. Introduction to various methodological and theoretical frameworks. Thesis or essay prospectus is the final product of this course. Strongly recommended for juniors. Three-hour research lab required. (SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. research lab (Anthropology) CW SOC

Fall 2017, Fall 2018

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SOAN 0304 - Gender, Culture, and Power      

Gender, Culture, and Power
This course offers a cross-cultural introduction to the issues involved in the study of women and gender. Such an endeavor raises a number of difficult and delicate issues. What explains the diversities and similarities in women's roles across societies? How do we assess women's status and power, and how do we decide which standards to use in doing so? What forces create changes in women's roles? What is the relationship between gender constructions and the nature of communities, economies, and even nations? Our analysis will concentrate on three primary domains: family and kinship, symbolic systems, and political economy. Course readings will focus primarily on non-Western societies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology) /(National/Transnational Feminisms)/ AAL CMP SOC

Fall 2017

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SOAN 0305 - Topics in Sociological Theory      

Topics in Sociological Theory
This course provides an overview of major lines of development in 20th century social theory relevant to the field of sociology, focusing on how various theorists have grappled with the basic issues that have dominated 20th century social thought. Particular attention will be given to the questions arising from the conceptual distinctions between structure and action, on the one hand, and identity and culture, on the other. How is social order possible? How autonomous are human agents? How do we explain the persistence of observed patterns of human interaction and social practice? How do we analyze relations between the world of everyday life and the large-scale development of social systems? How does social change take place? (SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105) 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology) SOC

Fall 2017, Fall 2018

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SOAN 0306 - Topics Anthropology Theory      

Topics in Anthropological Theory
This course gives an introduction to some important themes in the development of anthropological thought, primarily in the past century in anglophone and francophone traditions. It emphasizes close comparative reading of selections from influential texts by authors who have shaped recent discourse within the social sciences. (SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105) 3 hrs. lect. (Anthropology) SOC

Spring 2018, Spring 2019

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SOAN 0313 - White People      

White People
White people are too often invisible when it comes to having a race. In this course we will examine the formation of whiteness as an always present if often ignored, racial category, that came ashore with the Pilgrims. We will explore how whiteness became a foundational category for citizenship after the Civil War, when the Color Line was drawn through legal, cultural, and spatial practices. Finally, we will look at the formation of whiteness as a site of privilege, aggrieved entitlement, and even a category of "trash" in the more recent past. We will also situate whiteness, like all racial categories, as entangled with class, gender, sexuality, and nationality. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1357) (Formally was GSFS/SOAN 0413) 3 hrs. sem. (Sociology) AMR NOR SOC

Fall 2018

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SOAN 0314 - Sociology of Heterosexuality      

Sociology of Heterosexuality
Most people believe that heterosexuality is natural or rooted in biology and so never look very closely at it as a product of culture. In this course we will examine the artifacts, institutions, rituals, and ideologies that construct heterosexuality and the heterosexual person in American culture. We will also pay close attention to how heterosexuality works alongside other forms of social power, especially gender, race, and class. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology) AMR NOR SOC

Spring 2018

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SOAN 0319 - Idea of Drugs and Addiction      

The Idea of Drugs and Addiction
Drugs cause panic and social hysteria. We spend time talking about them and expend energy distinguishing between good and bad drugs and users. Movies, documentaries, literature, art, and television shows reflect this preoccupation with the use and misuse of drugs. In this course we will investigate the social significance of “drugs” as a cultural, rather than pharmacological, category. We will consider drugs and addiction as ideas that reflect concerns about the “self” in modernity. We will examine the panic surrounding drug use and addiction, our preoccupation with treatment, and our emphasis on sobriety. Overall, we will engage with the larger themes the idea of drugs and addiction raises: harm, exclusion, inequality, pleasure, freedom, desire, perfection, enlightenment, and control. 3hrs. lect./disc. (SOAN 0105 or SOAN 0288) (Sociology) AMR CMP NOR SOC

Fall 2017

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SOAN 0320 - Environmental Justice US      

Environmental (in)Justice in America
In this class we will explore dimensions of racial, class, and gender justice and injustice in the context of human-environmental relations in the United States. We will identify the ecological and socio-political forces that motivated attention to environmental justice starting in the mid-20th century. We will then employ theoretical theories such as critical race theory, social construction, and ecofeminism to examine recent cases of environmental injustice in the United States. Students will also investigate recent citizen, government, and corporate responses to environmental injustice to determine if they are fostering more equitable futures or actually (re)creating socio-environmental disparities in America. 3 hrs lect./disc. (Sociology) AMR NOR SOC

Spring 2018

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SOAN 0326 - Latin American Culture Society      

Latin American Culture and Society
Latin America is a paradise for cultural anthropologists because, with its long history of invasion and cultural hybridization, it is a meeting ground for people from all over the world. This course looks at how the Americas south of the Rio Grande have been symbolized, constructed and contested in debates over national character, the culture of poverty, and dependency on foreign powers. Case material includes peasants, shanty-town dwellers, immigrants to the U.S. and the iconic figures of the Vodoun healer, pop star, druglord and guerrillero. Topics include the polarities of identity along the U.S.-Mexican border, African possession cults of the Caribbean, the requirements of survival for the poor of the Brazilian Northeast, the hegemony of "whiteness" in the mass media, and the frustrated messianic strivings of revolutionary Cuba. This course is primarily for students doing study abroad in the region. 3 hrs. lect./disc., 2 hrs. screen (Anthropology) AAL AMR SOC

Spring 2019

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SOAN 0327 - Aztec Empire/Spanish Conquest      

The Aztec Empire and the Spanish Conquest
This course centers around the rise and fall of the Aztecs, the first state-level society encountered by the Spanish in 1519. Although primarily known today for their military exploits for what today is Mexico, the Aztecs produced great artisans, artists, and philosophers whose contributions endure in contemporary Mexican culture. We will trace the origins and development of Aztec civilization to its encounter with the Spanish in 1519. The course also covers the Spanish background for the Conquest, from the martial and political expulsion of Moors and Jews from the Iberian Peninsula in 1492 to the Spanish Inquisition. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)/ AAL AMR CMP HIS SOC

Spring 2018

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SOAN 0328 - The Ancient Maya      

The Rise and Fall of the Ancient Maya
As perhaps the most famous of all of the cultures of Mesoamerica, the Maya are best known for soaring temples, portraits of kings, a complex hieroglyphic writing system, and a dramatic collapse when their ancient kingdoms were abandoned or destroyed. In this course, we will view their accomplishments through the archaeology of the Classic Period (250-850 AD) and examine how the Maya built cities within the tropical jungles of present-day Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador, and Honduras. We will also explore the history of the Maya after the “fall,” from their revival in the post-Classic Period to the present day. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology) AAL AMR SOC

Fall 2017, Spring 2019

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SOAN 0329 - Refugees or Labor Migrants?      

Refugees or Labor Migrants? The Anthropology of South-North Migration
More people from low-income countries are seeking to enter high-income countries. How many are refugees fleeing oppression, and how many are labor migrants seeking to increase their incomes and consumption levels? Do they have a human right to be admitted? Beefed-up border enforcement has led to thousands of deaths in the American Southwest and the Mediterranean, and now anxious voters are electing politicians who promise even harsher crackdowns. Based on ethnographies of international migration streams, this course will explore debates over border enforcement, migrant rights, the deportation industry and the migration industry, low-wage labor markets, and remittance economies, with a focus on Latin American migration to the U.S., African and Mideastern migration to Europe, and South Asian migration to the Middle East (Not open to students who have taken SOAN 1021) Limited places available for students to satisfy the college writing requirement. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology) AAL AMR CMP SOC

Fall 2017

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SOAN 0338 - The Long Civil Rights Movement      

The Long Civil Rights Movement
The Civil Rights Movement is one of the most significant political forces in American history, but too often we reduce it to its heyday in the 1950s and 60s. In this course we engage a much longer, more varied history of African American freedom struggles, from protests against segregated trains in the late 19th century to today’s #BlackLivesMatter. We use social movement theory to explore these cases, and use the cases to develop new theories of politics and social structure, paying close attention to the roles of organizations, resources, leadership, recruitment, commitment, values, ideology, culture, gender, and counter-movements. 3 hrs. lect. AMR NOR SOC

Fall 2018

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SOAN 0341 - Anthropology of War and Peace      

Anthropology of War and Peace
If peace provides such obvious benefits, why is warfare so persistent in human history? Why can organized violence be so appealing and even generate sanctity? Has human evolution selected for aggression, making violence an innate characteristic of human beings, or is violent behavior better understood as a product of how we are socialized? Why are religious and ethnic tensions interrupting the benefits of technological progress and global trade? Why has human rights activism been unable to halt the latest wars? What works to end wars? This course will begin with the cross-cultural study of war in pre-state societies, then turn to how states and empires provide the context for gang warfare in the U.S. and Latin America, civil wars in West Africa, and religiously-based violence in the Mideast. Simultaneously, we will explore how social groups make peace through intermarriage, other sociopolitical rituals, and religious conversion. 3 hrs. lect./disc., 2 hrs. screen (Anthropology)

Spring 2018

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SOAN 0342 - Trust and Social Capital      

Trust: Social and Cultural Capital
How do people come to trust or distrust one another? How does this relate to strategies for accumulating economic, social, and cultural capital? This class surveys cross-cultural examples of trust and accumulation in order to develop an intellectual tool kit for understanding and engaging issues of trust and community in periods of rapid social change. The themes will be broadly applicable to any sort of social activism. The core ideas will come from Bourdieu and Putnam, and these will be refined with case studies from non-Western societies. (Any 100-level SOAN course) 3 hrs. Sem. CMP SOC

Spring 2018

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SOAN 0344 - Anthro Political Polarization      

Anthropology of Political Polarization
In this course we will apply the anthropology of evolution, religion and politics to analyze the operative mechanisms of political polarization. Our framework will include natural selection for accountability, moralism, and factionalism; how social groups define themselves through mimesis, othering, and scapegoating; how scapegoating justifies aggression; how sacrifice and other forms of ritualizing victimhood generate sanctity, sacrilege, and outrage; and how religious and political loyalty tests enforce social boundaries. Our case studies will include how antagonistic groups in contemporary U.S. society formulate conspiracy theories to justify mutual rejection 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR NOR SOC

Fall 2018

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SOAN 0351 - Education and Social Policy      

Education and Social Policy
School choice programs like charter and magnet schools are dramatically altering the educational landscape in the United States. In this course we will examine the premise that we can overcome the challenges of children living in poor neighborhoods by severing the traditional link between neighborhoods and schools and by providing access to extralocal high-quality schools. But who gets to exercise such choice? Does school choice result in better educational outcomes? We will also explore the relationship between school and neighborhood inequality. How do these two contexts work together to reproduce, intensify, or ameliorate spatial and educational inequities? 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Sociology)/ AMR NOR SOC

Spring 2019

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SOAN 0355 - Race Ethnicity Across Cultures      

Race and Ethnicity Across Cultures
Ethnicity and race are social phenomena that influence group relations, as well as personal identity, in many areas of the world. But what is "ethnicity" and what is "race"? In this course we will explore the varied approaches that have been utilized to understand race and ethnicity across diverse cultural settings. No single explanation of race and ethnicity is all encompassing, and so we will explore a number of different approaches. Among the issues we will examine are: alternative explanations of ethnic and racial identity formation; the causes and consequences of ethnic violence and competition; the connections among ethnicity, gender, and class; and the processes through which distinctions between self and other are created. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology) CMP SOC

Fall 2017

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SOAN 0356 - Significance of Race in the US      

The Continuing Significance of Race in the United States
This course will introduce students to theories of race and racism in the United States, how racial categories are formed and maintained in a variety of social arenas, and how race and racism influence social systems. In order to demonstrate the prevalence of race and racism in the U.S., the course will be a “topics” course in that each week, we will explore a different topic (such as education, crime, gender) and examine how they are influenced by race and racism. In addition, the course will compare and contrast the experiences of different racial and ethnic groups in the United States and examine how these different experiences influences the way they are seen, how they see themselves, and how they interact with other groups. Upon completion of the course, students will have a better understanding of the historic and contemporary significance of race and how race influences our everyday interactions in multiple different social arenas. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology) AMR CMP NOR SOC

Spring 2018, Fall 2018

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SOAN 0357 - Death and the Body      

Death and the Body
This course will provide an overview of how archaeologists and anthropologists encounter and interpret death in societies worldwide. We will look at death and the body from the perspective of burials and tombs, discussing ancient and modern conceptions of souls, afterlives, and identities. Drawing upon my own research in the tropical lowlands of Guatemala and Honduras, we will compare Maya attitudes towards death with those of other world societies, from the mummies of ancient Egypt to modern jazz funerals in New Orleans. We will explore different ideas about death, social boundaries, and even what it is to be human. 3 hrs. lect. (Anthropology) AAL AMR CMP SOC

Fall 2018

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SOAN 0365 - Political Sociology      

Political Sociology
Political sociology examines the way power operates in society. In this class we will approach this question through different lenses-Liberal-pluralism, Marxism, Elite theory-to achieve an overview of the field. We will cover a variety of related issues including questions of political parties and the state, nationalism, identity, revolutions, and social movements. We will strive to understand why unequal power relations exist and how they change. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology) AMR NOR SOC

Fall 2017

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SOAN 0370 - Soc of Knowledge and Food      

Sociology of Knowledge and Food Systems
What is knowledge? Drawing on social theorists such as
Foucault, Haraway, and Jasanoff, in this course students will use the food system to examine the social construction of knowledge. We will explore the rise and important contributions of science across much of the globe, and we will also regard challenges to science’s dominant position. Students will critically evaluate whether and how other forms of knowledge can or should shape contemporary social, cultural, and political life. Specific cases will include genetic modification, the patenting of life forms, and food justice. Students with any topical interest, however, are welcome. (SOAN 105). 3 hrs sem. (Sociology) SOC

Fall 2017

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SOAN 0376 - Politics of Identity      

Politics of Identity
In this course we will introduce students to social diversity in the U.S. as it is reflected in four master identities: class, gender, race, and sexuality. We will examine what these identities mean for group membership, how group membership is attained or ascribed and maintained. Using both historical and contemporary materials, we will explore how identities have developed over time and how they have been challenged. In addition, we will examine how multiple identities intersect and the implications of these intersections have on individual identities. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Sociology) AMR NOR SOC

Fall 2017, Spring 2019

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SOAN 0384 - Women, Religion, & Ethnography      

Women, Religion, and Ethnography
In this course we will focus on ethnographic scholarship regarding women in various religious traditions. We will begin with questions of feminist ethnography as proposed by Lila Abu-Lughod and then read a range of ethnographies focusing on women in different contexts, including a female Muslim healer in South India, Kalasha women in Pakistan, Bedouin Muslim women in Egypt, and Catholic nuns in Mexico. We will focus on how gendered and religious identities are constructed and intertwined, and what ethnography contributes to the study of both religion and gender. A prior course in Religion, Anthropology, or Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies is recommended. 3 hrs. sem. AAL CMP PHL

Spring 2019

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SOAN 0385 - Social Statistics      

Social Statistics
In this course we will learn the practical tools social sociologists and other scientists use to analyze data quantitatively. Topics will emphasize applications with statistical software and data from the General Social Survey and other datasets. We will explore methods to describe statistics about samples, apply the principles of probability to make predictions about populations, and estimate the significance of those predictions through inference and hypothesis testing. We will conclude with an introduction to linear regression. (Open only to majors or by Instructor Approval) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Sociology)/ DED SOC

Spring 2018, Spring 2019

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SOAN 0387 - Medical Anthropology      

Medical Anthropology: Approaches to Affliction and Healing
In this course, an introduction to medical anthropology, we will explore cultural and political-economic perspectives on health, illness, and disease. Topics covered include: (1) biocultural approaches to understanding health; (2) medical systems, including biomedicine and others; (3) the effects of poverty and inequality on health outcomes; and (4) the social construction of health and illness. Students will apply these concepts in understanding an aspect of health, illness, or healing in their own research project with an ethnographic component. An introductory course in anthropology or familiarity with medical or public health issues is recommended. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology) CMP SOC

Spring 2018

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SOAN 0395 - Environmental Communication      

Environmental Communication
Do languages simply put different labels on the environment, from rocks to trees to carbon, or are what we see and what we value shaped by the ways that we talk about it? Drawing upon ethnography, linguistics, and critical discourse analysis, we will explore how environmental perceptions and modes of action are formed in and through language. We will bring an appreciation of language differences to the analysis of ongoing environmental controversies, where the various stakeholders draw contrasting boundaries between nature and culture and define human involvement with nature in different ways. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)/ CMP SOC

Spring 2018

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SOAN 0430 - Higher Education and Society      

Higher Education and Society
Concerns about quality, value, and cost have raised doubts about whether higher education remains a pathway to opportunity. In this seminar we will consider these issues by reviewing research on the changing demographics of students, the evolving definition of “merit” in admissions, the challenges of assessing what students learn, and the relationship between student loan debt and economic inequality. We will also examine how college shapes later outcomes such as income, health, and family formation. Finally, we will discuss efforts to reform higher education and the potential for innovations like global expansion to reshape postsecondary schooling in the future. 3 hrs. sem. (Sociology)/ SOC

Fall 2018

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SOAN 0460 - Global Consumptions      

Global Consumptions: Food, Eating, and Power in Comparative Perspective
Using interdisciplinary approaches, we will examine the practices and politics of food and eating in a range of regions. Food sustains not only bodies, but national, ethnic, and social identities as well. Notions of time and space, order and transgression, nature and culture have long affected what people eat and how they do it. How does eating, this most basic and universal of human practices, both reflect difference and create it? How are food systems, symbolic and “real,” linked to national and international politics: Finally, how are contemporary food practices influenced by “modernization” and “globalization”? We will consider these and other questions as they apply to Asia, Europe, Africa, Latin America, and the United States in the second half of the twentieth century. 3 hrs. sem. (Anthropology)/

Spring 2018

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SOAN 0464 - Digital Cities      

Digital Cities
Today’s city is not just social and material, but also digital. These elements overlap and combine, generating hybrid spaces, relationships, experiences, and memories. The digital city is a creative city, but also a city of constraint, of control, of contradictions. It liberates some, even as it deepens inequalities for many. In this course we use urban and sociological theories to pry open these processes and make sense of these new urban forms. We draw on methods and tools from digital social sciences and humanities to study today’s urban digital relations and artifacts, and even make some of our own. 3 hrs. sem. CMP SOC

Spring 2019

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SOAN 0470 - Soc of Knowledge and Food      

Sociology of Knowledge and Food Systems
What is knowledge? Drawing on social theorists such as
Foucault, Haraway, and Jasanoff, in this course students will use the food system to examine the social construction of knowledge. We will explore the rise and important contributions of science across much of the globe, and we will also regard challenges to science’s dominant position. Students will critically evaluate whether and how other forms of knowledge can or should shape contemporary social, cultural, and political life. Specific cases will include genetic modification, the patenting of life forms, and food justice. Students with any topical interest, however, are welcome. (SOAN 105). 3 hrs sem. (Sociology) SOC

Fall 2017

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SOAN 0478 - Sociology of Punishment      

Sociology of Punishment
In this course, we will examine the changing ideologies and practices of state-sponsored punishment that have led to the spectacular expansion of imprisonment and other forms of penal supervision in the U.S. Drawing on theoretical accounts of punishment, historical examinations of prison and parole, and contemporary studies of criminal law and sentencing, we will consider social control as it plays out via institutionalized contexts, namely prisons and asylums, as well as alternative sanctions, such as coerced treatment. We will identify the major phases of penal development and consider mass imprisonment as both a reflection and cause of racial and economic inequality. (SOAN 0105) 3 hrs. sem. (Sociology) AMR NOR SOC

Spring 2018

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SOAN 0494 - Writing for Social Change      

Writing Ethnography for Social Change
In this course we will use frequent writing assignments, extensive peer reviews, and analysis of famous texts in a concentrated and intensive effort to improve our own ability to communicate in writing. In the first half of the course, we will focus on writing conventions and controversies in Anthropology, building skills useful in preparing senior work. In the second half of the course, we will break out of these academic conventions to focus on writing for broader audiences. We will ask: how can we successfully communicate the relevance of theoretical concepts in sociology and anthropology to the general public? (SOAN 301 or SOAN 302) 3 hrs. sem. (Anthropology) CW SOC

Fall 2017

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SOAN 0495 - Environmental Communication      

Language and the Environment
Do languages simply put different labels on the environment, from rocks to trees to carbon, or are what we see and what we value shaped by the ways that we talk about it? Drawing upon ethnography, linguistics, and critical discourse analysis, we will explore how environmental perceptions and modes of action are formed in and through language. We will bring an appreciation of language differences to the analysis of ongoing environmental controversies, where the various stakeholders draw contrasting boundaries between nature and culture and define human involvement with nature in different ways. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)/ CMP SOC

Spring 2019

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SOAN 0500 - Advanced Individual Study      

Prior to registering for SOAN 0500, a student must enlist the support of a faculty advisor from the Department of Sociology/Anthropology. (Open to Majors only) (Approval Required) (Sociology or Anthropology)

Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2021

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SOAN 0700 - One-Semester Senior Project      

One-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a student will carry out an independent, one-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 25-40 pages, due the last day of classes. (Sociology or Anthropology)

Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2021

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SOAN 0710 - Multi-Semester Senior Project      

Multi-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a senior will carry out an independent multi-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 60-100 pages, due either at the end of the Winter Term or the Friday after spring break. (Sociology or Anthropology)

Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022

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SOAN 1032 - Cinematic Sociology      

Cinematic Sociology
In this course we will develop our sociological imagination by viewing, discussing, and analyzing popular films. Rather than considering them simply as "entertainment," we will explore the various ways that popular films can be a vehicle for social commentary, analysis, and criticism, particularly about controversial topics (such as race, gender, sexuality). This course is not open to students who have taken SOAN 0352 or FYSE 1430. (Sociology) SOC WTR

Winter 2018

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SOAN 1033 - Stranger Danger      

Stranger Danger
How do we come to think of some things as 'native,' and others as 'foreign,' ‘invasive,' or 'alien?' In this course we take a broad view of the stranger, examining when and how the unfamiliar becomes familiar, and when it becomes Other. Employing methodologies from cultural and linguistic anthropology, we explore topics such as: hospitality and kinship; immigration and citizenship; language politics and nativism; zebra mussels, honeybees, and little green men. SOC WTR

Winter 2018

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SOAN 1034 - Skull Wars      

Skull Wars: Sordid True Tales of Rapacity, Revenge, and Racism in the Search for Human Origins
Jane Goodall and Dian Fossey. Richard Leakey and Don Johanson. Lee Berger and Tim White. In this course we will examine how jealousy, competition, and racism drive knowledge production and sabotage in the hunt for human ancestors. We’ll do so by exploring how these personalities, and others, have leveraged the media, from the New York Times to National Geographic, to push forward their vision and status in science. Through scientific articles, popular books, and film, we’ll also explore how colonialism, neo-colonialism, and racism have plagued, and continue to plague, the science of paleoanthropology. (Anthropology)/ SOC WTR

Winter 2018, Winter 2019

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SOAN 1035 - Anthro of Labor Migra & Refuge      

Refugees or Labor Migrants: The Anthropology of South-North Migration
More people from low-income countries are seeking to move to high-income countries.  How many are refugees fleeing oppression, and how many are labor migrants seeking to increase their incomes and consumption levels? Do they have a human right to be admitted? Beefed-up border enforcement has led to thousands of deaths in the American Southwest and the Mediterranean, and now anxious voters are electing politicians who promise even harsher crackdowns. Based on research with international migration streams, this course will explore debates over border enforcement, migrant rights, the deportation industry and the migration industry, low-wage labor markets, and remittance economies, with a focus on Latin American migration to the U.S., as well as African and Mideastern migration to Europe (Not open to students who have taken SOAN 1021 or SOAN 329) AAL AMR CMP SOC

Winter 2019

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SOAN 1036 - Global Population Dynamics      

Global Population Dynamics
In this course we will study three major processes of population change - fertility, mortality, and migration. We will learn about the theories and methods demographers use to explain population change. Course concepts will be applied to explore questions, such as: Why are birth rates in Italy and Japan so low? What were the consequences of China’s One Child Policy? Are fears of global overpopulation grounded or exaggerated? What is the immigrant health paradox and does it still exist? Course material primarily draws on perspectives from sociology with additional materials from global and public health, economics, gender studies, and anthropology. (Sociology)/ SOC WTR

Winter 2019

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SOAN 1161 - Refugee Crises in South Asia      

Refugee Crises in South Asia
In this course we will take a multi-disciplinary approach to study cases of refugee crises in contemporary South Asia—one of the largest refugee hosting regions of the world. We will examine the ongoing Rohingya Refugee Crisis in the Bangladesh-Myanmar Borderland, and try to connect it to earlier refugee crises situations in the region, such as during the Partition of British India in 1947, the Bangladesh war of 1971, the disenfranchisement of Nepali-origin Bhutanese in the eighties, and the three decade-long Sri Lankan Civil War. Lectures will be complemented with film screenings and interviews of South Asia experts via Skype. (International Relations & Foreign Policy) /(Anthropology)/ AAL SOA SOC

Winter 2019

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