Andrea Lloyd

Professor of Biology

 
 work(802) 443-5735
 on leave academic year

I am a plant ecologist interested in the effects of climate change on forest communities.

I teach BIOL 0140 (ecology and evolution), BIOL 230 (global change biology), BIOL 323 (plant community ecology), as well as a variety of first-year and senior seminars that explore ecological history, climate change, and land-use change in Vermont. In my research, I use tree rings to understand how changes in climate affect the growth and population dynamics of tree species in Alaska and Siberia. I have collaborated with numerous Middlebury students over the years to study how changes in disturbance regime have affected an old-growth hemlock forest, the Battell Research Forest, in central Vermont.  Follow this link to read more about my research in Vermont and Alaska.

 

Courses

Course List: 

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

AMST 0300 - Everglades History and Science      

Reclaiming the Swamp: History, Science, and the Challenge of the Everglades
In this course we will survey the cultural and ecological history of the Everglades, starting in the early 19th century and culminating in current restoration efforts. A critically endangered ecosystem, the Everglades illustrates the concept of a “wicked environmental problem”: one characterized by high uncertainty and conflict over values. Following our historical survey of the Everglades, we will shift to a project-based investigation of the local and global forces that shape the region. Course materials will be drawn from fiction, art, historical studies, policy documents, and scientific literature. Students should be prepared to work collaboratively to engage a variety of primary sources. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR HIS NOR

Fall 2016, Fall 2017

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BIOL 0230 - Global Change Biology      

Global Change Biology
We will examine the effects of global climate change on the earth system. Our emphasis will be on exploring what we know about the impacts of climate change on ecosystems, and how we know it: how do biologists study processes on a global scale? How accurately can we predict future changes in ecosystem distribution and function? We will also delve into how changing ecosystem processes are likely to affect humans, through impacts on ecosystem services, for example. The course will culminate with an examination of science communication, and students will engage in independent projects to practice the art of effective science communication. (BIOL 0140) 3 hrs. lect. SCI

Fall 2018

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BIOL 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
In this course students complete individual projects involving laboratory and/or field research or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and a faculty advisor. Prior to registering for BIOL 0500, a student must have discussed and agreed upon a project topic with a member of the Biology Department faculty. Additional requirements include attendance at all Biology Department seminars and participation in any scheduled meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and lab groups. This course is not open to seniors; seniors should enroll in BIOL 0700, Senior Independent Study. (BIOL 0211. Approval required) 3 hrs. disc.

Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019

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BIOL 0700 - Senior Independent Study      

Senior Independent Study
In this course students complete individual projects involving laboratory and/or field research or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and a faculty advisor. Prior to registering for BIOL 0700, a student must have discussed and agreed upon a project topic with a member of the Biology Department faculty. Additional requirements include attendance at all Biology Department seminars and participation in any scheduled meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and lab groups. (BIOL 0211. Approval required; open only to seniors) 3 hrs. disc.

Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019

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BIOL 0701 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis
Seniors majoring in Biology who have completed one or more semesters of BIOL 0500 or BIOL 0700 and who plan to complete a thesis should register for BIOL 0701. In this course students will produce a written thesis, deliver a public presentation of the research on which it is based, and present an oral defense of the thesis before a committee of at least three faculty members. Additional requirements include attendance at all Biology Department seminars and participation in any scheduled meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and lab groups. Open to Biology and joint Biology/Environmental Studies majors. (BIOL 0211 and BIOL 0500 or BIOL 0700 or waiver; instructor approval required for all students) 3 hrs. disc

Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019

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ENVS 0335 - Hope and Climate Change      

Hope in a time of Climate Change
Climate change is arguably the most important challenge facing the world; addressing it will require the cooperation of diverse stakeholders. In this course we will ask how Christian theological and ecological viewpoints contribute to our understandings of climate change: how we got here, what it means to live in a time of climate change, and the basis of hope for the future. We will also explore how partnerships between science and religion can contribute to efforts to address climate change. Readings in the course will include works of Christian theology, history of science, and selections from the primary scientific literature. (not open to students who have taken ENVS 1040) 3 hrs sem. PHL

Spring 2020

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ENVS 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
In this course, students (non-seniors) carry out an independent research or creative project on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment. The project, carried out under the supervision of a faculty member with related expertise who is appointed in or affiliated with the Environmental Studies Program, must involve a significant amount of independent research and analysis. The expectations and any associated final products will be defined in consultation with the faculty advisor. Students may enroll in ENVS 0500 no more than twice for a given project. (Approval only)

Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019

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ENVS 0700 - Senior Independent Study      

Senior Independent Study
In this course, seniors complete an independent research or creative project on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment. During the term prior to enrolling in ENVS 0700, a student must discuss and agree upon a project topic with a faculty advisor who is appointed in or affiliated with the Environmental Studies Program and submit a brief project proposal to the Director of Environmental Studies for Approval. The expectations and any associated final products will be defined in consultation with the faculty advisor. Students may enroll in ENVS 0700 as a one-term independent study OR up to twice as part of a multi-term project, including as a lead-up to ENVS 0701 (ES Senior Thesis). (Senior standing; Approval only)

Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Spring 2021

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ENVS 1040 - Theology/Ecology Clim Change      

Theological and Ecological Perspectives on Climate Change
In this course we will examine the interplay between science and religion by examining ecological and theological perspectives on climate change. We will begin with an exploration of how ecology and Christian theologies see the relationship between humans and nature. From there, we will delve into climate change, asking how theological and ecological viewpoints contribute to our understandings of the problem and how each elicits responses in the form of social action and policy. The course will end with an examination of how partnerships between scientific communities and communities of faith are addressing climate change and environmental justice. This course counts as an approved Integrative Cognate toward fulfillment of the ES major cognate requirement. PHL WTR

Winter 2019

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Select Publications

*Indicates a Middlebury College student

Lloyd, A.H. and A.G. Bunn. 2007. Response of the circumpolar boreal forest to 20th century climate variability. Environmental Research Letters. 2 045013 (13pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/2/4/045013.


Lloyd, A.H., C.L. Fastie, and H. Eisen*. 2007. Fire and substrate interact to control the northern range limit of black spruce (Picea mariana) in Alaska. Canadian Journal of Forest Research. 37:2480-2493.


Lloyd, A.H., A.E. Wilson*, C. L. Fastie, R. M. Landis. 2005. Population dynamics of black and white spruce in the southern Brooks Range, Alaska. Canadian Journal of Forest Research. 35 (9): 2073-2081

Department of Biology

McCardell Bicentennial Hall
276 Bicentennial Way
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753